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Iran, Turkey, Russia summit seeks to avert a bloodbath in northwestern Syria

21 Comments
By ZEINA KARAM

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21 Comments
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Avert a bloodbath? That's the headline, barrel bombs, chlorine bombs, apparently random bombing of hospitals think the blood bath has and is happening already. The more we grow the more we stay the same.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Ewww! That photo. Evil and eviler.

I feel sorry for the Syrian citizens whose deaths are being planned by these two sinister men.

Imagine that! Bringing in an outsider to help you kill off your own citizens. The outside world should just butt out, give every Syrian one gun with one bullet in it and say, "OK, you decide."

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Iran, Turkey, Russia summit 

The reforming of old empires is well underway.

The easiest way for Russia to sell its military involvements and expansion to 'westerners' is by saying they're trying to stop Islamic terrorism. I agree it must be stopped; however, at what cost. 

The US under Trump is too disorganized to do anything but continue to get in the way, resulting in even more deaths and destruction.

China sits back waiting to pick up the pieces.

The Muslim world might be too factionalized to be a global threat to become a united empire. Iran and Turkey joining forces in opposition to Saudi, the UAE and others a case in point. No doubt, unfortunately, some factions will continue terroristic activities. Individual states must do what they can to stop them.

There have never been any ‘good’ empires. And it’s likely there never will be.

The empire that controls the largest share of the globe’s oil and gas controls the largest empire. 

Until the world finds ways to burn less gas and oil we’re stuck under one of the empires and/or empire wannabes.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Oh! Hi all purveyors of the Monroe doctrine. For several weeks now, Russia was providing definitive proof of false flags being prepared by the head choppers. Now, if after all this, the looney neo cons think they'll pull one over again to launch more missiles upon the helpless, ohhh prepare for a rude awakening. This is not a game. Cold war elders believe the tensions are much higher now than during their day. If that doesn't tell you something, then there's truly no hope for you.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

@theFritzX

Thanks! Let the truth and common sense prevail!

@stormcrow

The Syrian army was outnumbered by angry fellow citizens

Somehow all this "angry fellow citizens", with significant portion of foreign militants, are confined now only to Idlib.

Really, you're going to compare this to what the Russians have done to Aleppo?

Of course. Disappointed? You should be. The Russians at least organised several humanitarian corridors for ordinary people to leave the city and they stopped several times to allow civilians actually leave. Mosul was very different.

The Russian government only supports chemical attacks in the UK

Yes, the vial they found in the hotel!! LOL!!! In the hotel, where the "GRU spies duo" poured "the deadly nerve agent" into other vial without any protective gear! The funniest piece of nonsense I've heard in a month. It's even better then Colin Powell's vial with "Saddam's WMD".

1 ( +4 / -3 )

but also an estimated 10,000 hard-core fighters, including al-Qaida-linked militants.

So what plan does the West have for al-Qaida in Idlib?

Just let'em fester until they take down some more towers?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Russian forces and Syrian govt forces, happy hunting!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

If the present Syrian government has been democratically elected by the majority of its citizens, then why does that same government have to bring in outside help, the Russians and Iranians, to participate in the slaughter of its own citizens?

This looks more like an empire propping up one of its own colonies. We've all seen this before.

Furthermore, if the Syrian government is so benevolent regarding it own citizens, then why are millions of Syrians fleeing from their own country and seeking charity and shelter in other countries?

Maybe it's because their own government scares the hell out of all of them.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@cochise Russian forces and Syrian govt forces, happy hunting!

Once again no compassion shown for the Syrian people, instead war cheer-leading, just like @burningbush. There are no good guys fighting in Syria. There are no good guys supporting those fighting in Syria.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@pt There are no good guys fighting in Syria

@asakaze I hope you can say the same about those who invaded Afghanistan in 2001, Iraq in 2003 and Libya in 2011.

I can. And I can say the same about Russians fighting in Afghanistan 1979 - 1989. And Russians fighting in Georgia. Or any nation's army fighting outside its own nation's borders. 'Invited' or not. I know it's hard for nationalists to accept that if their country, for example Russia, is criticized that must mean someone favors America's or some other nation's invasions. But that's to be expected from nationalistic zealots who see the world in poles, their nation at one end, their 'enemies' at the other. Stuck in Soviet reasoning. LOL. I'm anti-nationalist, anti-totalitarian. I don't expect nationalists to understand.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Strangerland

There is very little true 'evil' in the world

And ISIS and others are among that "little true". Or do you think that people who cut other people's throats on videocamera have some nice traits? Very unusual perspective.

*Didn't you Russians learn anything in Afghanistan?

Actually they learned a lot, that's why their present military campaign in Syria is so effective. They combine use of force with careful work with locals, making everyday life better for them. And the Russians convinced the government to pursue the policy of reconciliation. In some areas ex-rebel groups amalgamated with government units.

In fact the question "didn't you learn anything in Afghanistan?" should be addressed to the Americans, they still believe in "good terrorists". They lovingly husbanded Osama in 80s during the war in Afghanistan and he thanked them with 9.11. Now they support other jihadists in belief that these fanatics will be useful and won't bite when they have a chance. Some people never learn.

@stormcrow

Why did Syria need Russia's help in the first place?

Read again, more attentively this time, my previous post. Jihadists often are better armed then the Syrian army.

leave it looking like Aleppo when they're done?

It will look much better then Mosul and Raqqa after Americans were done.

Will the Russians support and encourage the use of chemical weapons on civilians?

No, they never supported it. The jihadists staged such attacks to get help from NATO.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Asakaze, I completely agree.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Thanks! Let the truth and common sense prevail!

Propaganda isn't always based on truth. It's based on whatever agenda (good or bad) that interested parties want their populous to believe and support.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

My Russian friends said the military operation in Syria would last a few days.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@stormcrow

Ewww! That photo. Evil and eviler

I thought the same when I saw the photo of McCain meeting with confirmed Syrian jihadists.

why does that same government have to bring in outside help, the Russians and Iranians

Because the Syrian jihadists get even bigger outsude help - Saudis, Qatar, Israel, U.S, U.K. and other NATO members. A couple years ago there was an investigative report by a Bulgarian journalist about the massive arms supplies from Bulgaria and Rumania (they have redundant ex-Soviet weaponry) via Turkey. From the south border jihadists get Saudi and Israeli deliveries. Sometimes jihadists are better equipped then the Syrian army. They even have TOW anti-tank launchers, NATO issue.

if the Syrian government is so benevolent regarding it own citizens, then why are millions of Syrians fleeing from their own country

Most of these people left Syria before 2015 when the Syrian government had actual control of only about 10 percent of the country. We can presume that the people were fleeing not from the government, but from those who came instead of it. Now people began to return to the areas liberated by the Syrian army.

@PTownsend

There are no good guys fighting in Syria

I hope you can say the same about those who invaded Afghanistan in 2001, Iraq in 2003 and Libya in 2011.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@theeastisred

You look handsome in those photos from Salisbury railway station!

Thank you, Boris! When you start at last to write on the subject and refrain from personal attacks?

@PTownsend

I don't expect nationalists to understand

I'm a realist and I firmly believe that a well-armed evil can be defeated only by force, not by utopian sermons. ISIS, Jebhat an Nusra and others are evil, pure and simple. That's why I support Syrians, Russians, Iranians who fight them. That's why I support Americans when they fight ISIS, what a pity they do it too little because they are preoccupied with the protection of their world hegemony. I don't expect utopists to understand that.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I firmly believe that a well-armed evil can be defeated only by force, not by utopian sermons.

There are two fundamental problems with the above statement.

1) There is very little true 'evil' in the world. Some serial killers and serial rapists, who are true sadists. But most people feel justified in their actions, and do bad actions out of an intent of self preservation, or lack of forethought, rather than an active interest in harming another (aka evil).

2) You think the solution is a binary choice between pure force and pure pacifism. But pure force will never be any more effective than utopian sermons. Didn't you Russians learn anything in Afghanistan? A long term solution will require a firmness of resolve, with an olive branch of peace. You cannot stomp out rebellion or resistance. These things are ideas, they are ephemeral, they are not something that can be removed. They are as much a part of human nature as is the idea that said ideas can be defeated. No, they can only be managed; reduce risk and minimize negative effect. To do this requires being firm and fair, while working together with people, not trying to defeat them through force.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

@Goodlucktoyou

Terrorists are terrorists, wherever they are and whoever supports them. It's still no excuse for supporting a slaughter, be it in Yemen or Syria. One sin doesn't justify another one. The big powers should step back, not take the leading role, as the Russians are, in slaughtering innocent women and children.

@Asakaze

Then answer this:

Why did Syria need Russia's help in the first place?

Myself: If every Syrian had one gun with one bullet in it, it highly likely that Assad would be in his Rolls Royce with a U-haul trailer hooked up full of loot hightailing it to Moscow.

Do you think the people of Idlib are likely to see Russian jets firing missiles on their city and leave it looking like Aleppo when they're done?

Myself: Oh, yeah. I'll make a wager with you on that one if you like. You'd lose too.

Will the Russians support and encourage the use of chemical weapons on civilians?

Myself: The Russian government has already proven their callousness over and over again in the UK and that they don't give a s**t about using chemical weapons on foreign soil. It's really quite atrocious, wouldn't you say?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Funny how liberating the last bit of Syria from terrorists and warlords by a democratically elected government is somehow being called a bloodbath.

The American carpet bombing of Raqqa was a bloodbath.

The Israeli regime murder of peaceful protesters, and all the other attacks it has rained down on Gaza, the West Bank, Syria, and Lebanon, those were bloodbaths.

The operations to liberate parts of Damascus, Aleppo, Palmyra were NOT, though the propaganda would have you believe that a system designed to allow the roofs of buildings to be cleared of snipers ('barrel bombs', the name of which should clue you in that they were not designed to penetrate shelters or destroy buildings) with low risk to the civilians held hostage in them, and that military units with members who grew up in those places were indifferent to the death and destruction their operations were causing.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

@storm. You should study more. I’ve been all over Syria and still struggle.

uS, Saudi and israel support the terriorists with of course Britain and France.

people suffer there, we drive cars here.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@Asakaze 'Jihadists often are better armed then the Syrian army."

Like I said, if you gave every Syrian only one gun with one bullet, Assad would run to Moscow in a heartbeat. The Syrian army was outnumbered by angry fellow citizens.

"It will look much better then Mosul and Raqqa after Americans were done."

Really, you're going to compare this to what the Russians have done to Aleppo?

"No, they never supported it. The jihadists staged such (chemical) attacks to get help from NATO."

That makes perfect sense. The Russian government only supports chemical attacks in the UK. Thanks for explaining, that makes perfect sense. Syria - No! No! UK - Yes! Yes!

@theFritzX 'Asakaze, I completely agree."

From one who's a Trump lover to one who's a Putin lover. That also makes perfect sense. Democracy - No! No! Dictatorship - Yes! Yes!

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

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