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Russia sets out demands for resolving Ukraine crisis

21 Comments
By MATTHEW LEE

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21 Comments
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No crisis as such, only thing that it may take some time for the Media to accept Putin's victory.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

The west are upset that all the money they invested in a coup to overthrow a democratically elected government has gone to waste.

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

SimondB@If you really believe that, I suggest you read this piece from the Daily Beast: "Exclusive: Photographs Expose Russian-Trained Killers in Kiev"

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/03/30/exclusive-photographs-expose-russian-trained-killers-in-kiev.html

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

The fork-tongued Mr Kerry told a news conference in Paris: "We will not accept a path forward where the legitimate government of Ukraine is not at the table."

The legitimate government was ousted by the EUS-backed coup, and the current thugs in Kiev are illegitimate. Kerry is well-versed in Newspeak and Double-think.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

I'm amazed at the number of ex-Soviet plants posting here to support the Russian invasion of Crimea.

Moldova, you're next for a partial takeover, and then Russia will finish Ukraine, and then the rest of Moldova.

Putin is a dangerous megalomaniac, with or without shirt.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Ya, tavorish. Slushaiyu!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

" I'm amazed at the number of ex-Soviet plants posting here to support the Russian invasion of Crimea. Moldova, you're next for a partial takeover, and then Russia will finish Ukraine, and then the rest of Moldova. Putin is a dangerous megalomaniac, with or without shirt."

I'm amazed how effectively the Nay-vy Uh-CAD-duh-me brainwashed the pawns who regurgitate the party propaganda without using their own brain.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

So far, things seem to be panning out well, and for these two reasons: International interventions should not be carried out all willy-nilly, and the will of the people will eventually prevail.

International stability requires a modicum of decorum; even that Texan (can't think of a worse moniker) Bush at least gave pretense to the international community when he sent Powell to lie to the UN, and enough countries bought (or at least pretended to buy) the lies to give Bush's venture a gleam of global agreement. Putin should learn from that, and it seems that he has. If Ukraine is restructured as a federation and the eastern parts eventually petition to be absorbed by Russia, that is their right. What is not good is sending in the troops first.

Border states such as Iraq, Syria and Ukraine are in many cases better off following the course of the former Yugoslavia and letting their people secede. Certainly, some border states, such as Belgium and Switzerland, have managed to maintain national cohesiveness, but that does not mean that all can or should. If the people of eastern Ukraine definitely desire to join Russia, that should be their right - though it should be done in an organized fashion.

Putin will gain some territory; the rump Ukraine will align itself with the values and methods of Europe. There are no winners or losers here in a geopolitical sense as this is not the zero-sum Cold War game. I believe both Obama and Kerry understand this; they are trying to manage change as a series of small earthquakes to prevent the unleashing of a potentially very damaging Big One.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I believe we should just let Russia and China do as they please and forget it!! Seems I read that attitude here by many.. Thing is, Russia and China will never be a friend to the western nations and their allies unless their is something to gain politically or in the position of a step further towards their goal of domination which has been the only issue important to both these countries! It is not like this is some secrete that has not been in our faces since the beginning of time!!! many blind ignorant comments here being made as wishing to empower and embrace these two countries!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

"… many blind ignorant comments here being made as wishing to empower and embrace these two countries!"

Speaking of blind ignorant comments, that one is tops. What you so poignantly missed is the west and their agitators are sorely displeased that the overwhelming majority in Crimean chose in self-determination to NOT be aligned with the thugs running things in Kiev.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

John Galt, just out of curiosity, how do you feel about the fate of the Crimean Tatars? Should they be allowed to carve out an enclave out of the enclave?

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Russia could quickly de-escalate the tensions by simply moving those "military exercises" troops away from the Ukraine border (Russia is a big country - there are many places where they can do exercises).

Ukraine is right to worry - after all, Putin lied that those are not Russian troops in Crimea even though everybody already knew who they really are.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

wow a lot of russians here, though i do like watching newsclips of russian troop carriers flying russian colors busting through the naval headquarter compound walls- most footage was removed by the troops so all you saw where unarmed civs entering.

the whole thing was military occupation, removal of the ability of the ukraine to fight (most of the airforce was in crimea , almost all the navy and a good part of the armoured brigade.) though the troops were allowed the leave- their families had to stay behind. - so those troops are not going to fight.

all the arms are under russian control- they just left the troops leave- think of that - leaving your wife and children under the control of your enemy .

and the west won't give- or sell- arms to the Ukraine- so Putin is just playing a waiting game.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Moldova, you're next for a partial takeover, and then Russia will finish Ukraine, and then the rest of Moldova.

Not really. Putin declared to send back to Ukraine a seized military equipment.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Laguna, thanks for asking. If they were to comprise a majority in some district, then yes! However, at this time, they comprise only 10 - 12%.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

So far, things seem to be panning out well,

Optimism that's a tad premature in my view. I don't see that Putin will be satisfied with Crimea. Engaging in diplomacy isn't at all necessarily a sign that Russia's has no further wants. Moscow will want to engage the West and calm the game down for a bit so that the West; 1) accepts the new situation in Crimea and refrains from or walks back the sanctions. 2) set up the next topic - eastern Ukraine or whatever Moscow wants next.

The plan that Kerry and Lavrov are discussing covers Ukrainian political and constitutional reforms as well as the disarmament of irregular forces, international monitors to protect minority rights and direct dialogue between Russia and Ukraine,

Moscow's framing the conversation. The plan that they should be discussing should be about Crimea, about disarmament of irregular forces, international monitors , about holding a legitimate referendum, and if Crimea were to choose Russia (which I believe hey probably would but with more close run results) a plan to negotiate the transfer to the Russian Federation with guarantees to protect minority rights and the disposition of Ukrainian assets in Crimea.

Short of that plan, no recognition of Crimea as part of the Russian Federation, lock sanctions in where they are now, start a serious plan to wean Europe of their partial dependency on Russian gas, a percentage uptick in NATO member military spending.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Galt, according to Wikipedia, they compose over 50 percent of the population in several areas of the Crimea, and in one close to 90 percent. I wish them luck with their impending statehood; really, I don't know if Russia would do better oppressing them as part of Russia or as an independent entity.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crimean_Tatars

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

...unless their is something to gain politically or in the position of a step further towards their goal of domination which has been the only issue important to both these countries!

actually, the same could be said of the U.S.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Laguna, perhaps you are looking at old info? According to the 2001 Ukrainian census info, there were two areas in Crimea that maxed at 29.2%. I'm unable to find the numbers to which you refer on Wiki. On the page of Autonomous Crimea, the demographics figures read: " Ethnic makeup comprised the following self-reported groups: Russians: 58.5%; Ukrainians: 24.4%; Crimean Tatars: 12.1%; Belarusians: 1.5%; Tatars: 0.5%; Armenians: 0.4%; Jews: 0.2% and[59][60]"

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Let me get this straight, when is COUP D'ETAT of democratically elected government ok and overwhelming vote to democratically secede from Ukraine bad?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The fork-tongued Mr Kerry told a news conference in Paris: "We will not accept a path forward where the legitimate government of Ukraine is not at the table."

Nicely put, John. How about adding this: the fork-tongued Putin stated Russia had no intention to annex Crimea days before they actually did. The fork-tongued Putin announced pull backs from Ukraine border: no evidence of such.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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