world

10 ministers offer resignations as Australian political crisis deepens

12 Comments
By Martin PARRY

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2018 AFP

©2018 GPlusMedia Inc.


12 Comments
Login to comment

Another leadership challenge and likely another unelected PM put into office. The revolving door in Aussie politics is insane

3 ( +6 / -3 )

It's a two party system with some fringe parties. Too much power in too little hands. The PM is reliant on cabinet/ party members supporting them. In this case he has lost support. The American Conservative Advisers have managed to polarises the situation and further seperate the politicians from those they represent. Turnbull doesn't know the price of bread is a multi millionaire who want corporate tax cuts but raise tax on everyone else, sound familiar? Much prefer NZ system of Governance. Politics should not be a career but an act of service for the benefit of the country.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Another leadership challenge and likely another unelected PM put into office

@Asinine, Australian PMs are not US Presidents - they are not elected to office, except by their own parties. The office of 'Prime Minister' is not even named in the Australian Constitution. It's just a British colonial hangover , a bit like the Dominion of Canada's 'House of Commons'.

At least leadership challenges are possible. God knows most of the world and probably most of the US wish leadership challenges were just as possible there, where effectively their President is only not really directly elected, as the final outcome has to go through that Electoral College system.

Party leaders change but the parties remain in power: ALP 1983 - 96 Lib-Nat 96-07 ALP 07-13 Lib-Nat 13 to present.

Not so unstable.

Since 07, except for Gillard at times maybe, leaders were mostly duds, so thank God they could be tossed. Policy has remained fairly middle of the road one party after another. Leader replacement notions are just media pundits talking for the love of their own voices combined with gullible media consumers incapable of discriminating between fact and opinion.

The main issue for Liberal-Nationals is how prepared are they to have a term or two in opposition. In other words, how is their toleration of the increasingly electorally indigestible, right-wing, coal-loving, dispassionate, immigrant-hating, partisan, terrorist-paranoid, security-obsessive, regionally neglectful, elitist, conservative, conspiratorial, ratbag cabala?

9 ( +10 / -1 )

This is the power of a Parliament. You can have revolution as much as you want

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Certainly the revolving door of leaders has an impact on the speed in which decisions get made and that's my big beef with it. Energy policy delayed time and time again, certain defense acquisitions etc.

But there is little impact on overall economic stability and day to day life. Australia has maintained some of the highest GDP growth rates in the developed world, on average, for a longgg time, unemployment has been steady for a long time, inflation etc etc.

What has increased massively since the 2008 crash is government debt, but that's pretty much the same story across the whole world, certainly in the West and unlike everyone else, we did not have a recession.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

As George Carlin once said," It is all BS" & "it's a club and you aren't part of it"

Voting is a waste of effort

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

 Australia has maintained some of the highest GDP growth rates in the developed world, on average, for a longgg time, unemployment has been steady for a long time, inflation etc etc.

Australia is thriving as a source country for China and Japan, without the mining there'll be just a mediocre economy left.

https://www.rba.gov.au/snapshots/economy-composition-snapshot/

https://data.oecd.org/emp/employment-rate.htm

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The revolving door in Aussie politics is insane

I agree...as ridiculous as i thought Japanese revolving door politics were a decade ago , the Australian equivalent since Rudd was pushed aside has become just as bad. Ridiculous.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Ozziedesigner

Anyone who quotes George Carlin when it comes to something serious gets my Thumbs Up.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Karma.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Australia is thriving as a source country for China and Japan, without the mining there'll be just a mediocre economy left.

Its a sizable factor for sure, especially in terms of export earnings but the reality is that most of the mining companies are largely foreign owned, they don't employ many people (its a machine intensive field). Its not as important as people think it is.

The service industry is now far more important and we have seen with the significant downturn from the highs of mining in Western Australia that activity in the eastern states, like NSW and Victoria has successfully propped up overall growth rates, mainly due to construction, services and consumption based on increased immigration.

No doubt though that the country needs to diversify as much as possible. Obviously with Australia's tiny population we are going to struggle to have an impact in manufacturing, but with this next round of automation we may be able to be more competitive on manufacturing in some areas. We have the natural resources, its always been the availability and cost of labour that's held us back.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He is well and truly done, literally like a walking, empty corpse.

Watch the space, there is a lot going on In Canberra right now.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites