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Moscow records pandemic high for COVID cases for second day running

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By Evan GERSHKOVICH

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Officials are now rushing to reintroduce pandemic restrictions and roll out new beds dedicated to coronavirus patients.

On Saturday, Saint Petersburg announced it would restrict access to its main Euro 2020 fan zone on Konyushenaya Square to 3,000 people, down from 5,000, having earlier banned food sales in the fan zones.

It overtook Britain on Thursday as the European country having suffered the most Covid deaths, reaching 128,911 by Saturday. Kremlin critics argue the real figure is far higher due to undercounting by authorities.

Even Russia has to deal with this crisis of physics: hospitals/healthcare have limits - how are ya going to respond with limited resources

That's a real-world problem everyone has to find a solution for, when hospitals/healthcare get filled to capacity

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The Russians, normally meticulous in their planning for sport and chess, have been caught on the wrong foot by the covid virus. From now on they'll be playing covid whack-a-mole, a game this virus excels at. Meanwhile, many Russians may find a smidgen of solace in Putin's discomfort as his throne starts to wobble under pressure from the pandemic.

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Russian wasteland what can I say. Maybe they need to get some real vaccine to the people.

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This article is dedicated to the guy who spent a good part of spring trying to convince us all here that the Sputnik vaccine was the best in the world and that the russians all loved it. Good times.

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A recent independent survey found that 60 percent of Russians do not intend to be vaccinated.

Could it be that they don’t trust their own government’s claim of safety and efficacy?

Perhaps because the Russian government never ran Phase 3 trials?

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Russian sent millions and millions of doses of its coveted vaccine to poorer countries who couldn't develop their own.

For that reason local Russians have to bear the brunt of Russia's humanitarian efforts.

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Russian sent millions and millions of doses of its coveted vaccine to poorer countries who couldn't develop their own.

For that reason local Russians have to bear the brunt of Russia's humanitarian efforts.

Russia has only able to produce 35 million doses so far, most for use at home with 15 million sent abroad - but just 19.5 million Russians have received at least one dose

Russia has vaccine production issues, and Sputnik V is harder to produce since it uses 2 different adenovirus vectors on the 1st dose vs. the 2nd dose (so they can't just mass-produce 1 big batch, but rather they have to mass-produce 2 separate batches)

"Russia Struggles to Meet Demand for Its Covid-19 Vaccine - Moscow’s Sputnik V shot offered hope as coronavirus cases surged in developing world, but shipments have been hit by regulatory, production problems"

https://www.wsj.com/articles/russia-struggles-to-meet-demand-for-its-covid-19-vaccine-11620993601

“While Russia has been quite successful in selling it, they are now facing significant challenges in following up with doses,” said Andrea Taylor, assistant director of programs at Duke University’s Global Health Innovation Center.

Some 35 million doses have been made so far, mostly domestic production aimed mainly at the local population. Moscow has announced manufacturing deals with factories in China, South Korea and Turkey, among others, though these are yet to start mass production.

But Russia is late on some deliveries and analysts tracking the rollout say it lacks global production capacity to fill the orders. So far, it has delivered only about 15 million doses.

Mexican and Argentine authorities have reported delays in shipments of the vaccine’s second dose, which takes longer to produce, leaving them unable to complete the full vaccination cycle in some cases.

Sputnik V uses a genetically altered form of a common virus, known as adenovirus, as a vehicle for genetic material from the coronavirus. The vaccine’s ingredients are then grown in so-called bioreactors of some 2,000 liters where small changes in variables like temperature, air pressure or pH levels affect the yield.

Unlike other adenovirus-based vaccines like AstraZeneca, Sputnik V uses a different adenovirus for the second shot, which takes longer to grow, public health and vaccine experts said. Getting foreign manufacturers up to speed with the process takes additional time.

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Kremlin critics argue the real figure is far higher due to undercounting by authorities.

As compared with the United States, where previous counts are being reduced to reflect people actually dying from COVID rather than dying with the virus somewhere in their bodies. Tyrants never admit to the true scale of their errors.

The poor people of Russia have been saddled with corrupt and incompetent leaders for ... ever. I agree that distrust of their government is the most likely reason so few wish to be vaccinated. It certainly isn't because of microchip conspiracy theories.

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This article is dedicated to the guy who spent a good part of spring trying to convince us all here that the Sputnik vaccine was the best in the world and that the russians all loved it. Good times.

Majority of the ones getting sick and hospitalised right now are the those that did not get vaccinated.

The reason why some people don't want to get vaccinated is not because they don't trust the vaccine or whatnot, it's more of a 'since you need 70% to achieve herd immunity, someone else around me will get vaccinated instead because it's too mendokusai for me to do it'. Which is also why there are vaccination stations being set up at department stores etc. - shop and get your vaccine at the same place.

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