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Mubarak quits, hands over power to military

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At the White House, President Barack Obama said “Egyptians have inspired us”

Indeed they have!

Thinking back, perhaps the last time in history that my nation (the USA) has exhibited a similar sense of unified, unbridled joy and solidarity came at the end of WWII. For that reason, I can't help but feel a sense of envy towards the Egyptian people.

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I am so happy for the average man and woman, children of Egypt! I really hope and pray that Egypt can become a great democracy, a ray of hope for all those suffering under tyranny from Iran to Algeria and let us not forget the that only 1.00001% of Saudi Arabians live like filthy rich gods, while many others there work for peanuts, so as the PM of Israel said, Egypt is not Iran, trying to point out the level of difference between a modern country like Egypt that does have many problems but I really hope they can over come them and again, make it a shinning example to the rest of the Middle East, Africa and the world.

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"Egypt is free"

The military was always in control of Egypt. Mubarak was just a civilian figurehead(who overstepped his position). What many don't realize is that the last three Egyptian "presidents" were from the military: Nasser, Sadat and Mubarak (beginning 1956). Now the question becomes is how much the ruling officers will allow democracy to flourish. Turkey is the model most people point to. Let's hope that will be the case.

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All of Egypt is shouting (in Arabic): "Yes we can! Yes we can! Yes we can!"

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The military still in control - how is that free?

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The military still in control - how is that free?" Good question, and something gives me the vibe that Mubarak and his supporters aren't stepping off that easily..

Now I've watched the world give support to the people of Egypt, why didn't we do the same with Iran several months back? Would we do the same if another Tienanmen square rises up in China again?

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Egypt is awesome tonight, accept it. People rose up and took back their country. I don't know what future it holds, but this is an amazing day and not to be doubted the power of the people, united, will never be defeated. Sweet liberty indeed

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I'm willing to bet that things will get worse before they get better. Once they are sick of the military ruling with just another guy they front then they'll get their noses up again and let the Islamists in. Then they will regret ever asking Mubarak to leave. Give it time. I'm not counting on this country to get the democracy it's naive youth want.

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mikehuntez: Who are "they"?

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They being the naive Egyptian youth.

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Now I've watched the world give support to the people of Egypt, why didn't we do the same with Iran several months back? Would we do the same if another Tienanmen square rises up in China again?

I think the world did support Iran's uprising but the powers that be smashed it with extreme violence. China's an odd bird, certainly little was said about the ethnic uprising in Xinjiang before the Olympics.

Moderator: Back on topic please.

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Among highlights from the Pew poll:

• 49% of Egyptians say Islam plays only a "small role" in public affairs under President Hosni Mubarak, while 95% prefer the religion play a "large role in politics."

So, is anyone gonna come out and rant about such a conservative view?

• 84% favor the death penalty for people who leave the Muslim faith. This one too.

• 82% support stoning adulterers. and this

• 77% think thieves should have their hands cut off. don't know they mean as someone is stealing or as punishment though.

• 54% support a law segregating women from men in the workplace. Where are the women supporters?

• 54% believe suicide bombings that kill civilians can be justified. ?

• Nearly half support the terrorist group Hamas. That's a gimme

• 30% have a favorable opinion of Hezbollah. gimme

• 20% maintain positive views of al-Qaida and Osama bin Laden.

• 82% of Egyptians dislike the U.S. — the highest unfavorable rating among the 18 Muslim nations Pew surveyed.

Well, this gives me some insight on what to expect on their "new" election day. I've never had the chance to see the Pyramids, I guess I won't now

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Skip, you won't miss much. The country is a hole anyway. I don't expect it to change much at all but think they won't get their "democracy".

And I also wonder about the outrage at all those statistics you posted. But you know liberal progressives whose outrage for the Egyptian government hadn't existed from 1981 until 2011. Only very recently did their outrage develop.

Short lived euphoria is it. The Egyptians will find this out too. Let them to their own as long as it doesn't destabilize the region. But if it does then all our liberal progressive friends will somehow find a way to blame someone else. And by that I mean the USA. You watch. It'll happen.

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First of all, I would like to congratulate to all the people of Egypt. These people spoke and their voices were heard. It is an universal law of government that it should be FOR the people and BY the people.

But I am wonderling if this is a beginning of another chaos in the Middle East. It depends on the WILL of people of Egypt.

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mikehuntez: actually its really none of my business... its just that I see people on here cheering for a change and its a change I have a feeling is not what they really want but more of a "stick-it-to-ya" to the west. Kind of like using these poor people to advance their agenda.

Now, I really want to know when these very same people are going to support the Cuban government which has been equally sadistic as Mubarak.... they won't.

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"Egypt is free"

Not if the Islamic Brotherhood takes over.

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All of Egypt is shouting (in Arabic): "Yes we can! Yes we can! Yes we can!"

THis kind of Ameri-centric thinking is embarrassing.

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"Egypt is free" The only one who's really free is Mubarak. Sitting in a nice resort town with millions, billions of cash.

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Oh brother! I was waiting for the inevitable mention of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Get ready for the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood, lol. Will it be worse than The Rise of the Machines? Stay tuned!

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Hard to understand why you wold cheer military takeover of your government.

Why did Obama support "the young people" in Egypt demanding democracy but not those in Iran or Honduras???

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Here's hoping things get better for these people. They deserve it.

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Hopefully Obama will restore aid to Egypt to the levels it was when Bush was in office and promoting democracy in the region.

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Egypt is now having the cake. Let's see how they eat it, and how it will be. Stay tune, it is the crossing point for Egypt to better or worse. I hope Egypt will respect all religions, expressions, thus transforming into a civil nation without being exploited by extremists and self egoistic ruler

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Egypt is now having the cake. Let's see how they eat it, and how it will be. Stay tune, it is the crossing point for Egypt to better or worse. I hope Egypt will respect all religions, expressions, thus transforming into a civil nation without being exploited by extremists and self egoistic ruler

@Bgood41: take a look at skipthesong's previous post.

If the military has taken over, I am not so sure that there will be free elections in Sept. But at least from the military ranks there was not too much extremism, since you haven't heard of a revolt of the officers in the military for the past 30 years.

I too had wanted to see the pyramids, but now I guess I just have to watch them from the National Geographic channel.

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Well done Egypt may you shape your own future.

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Congrats to the Egyptian people. May they get the political system they want. Who are we to judge which one they will choose? As long as they are happy, I am happy too. And what is so wrong in visiting an Islamic State? Out of my personal experience, I can only say that I enjoyed my stay there more than in any other so called democratic country. So, go and see the pyramids without a worry, I certainly had a wonderful time in Egypt. Egyptian people have great hospitality and are extremely friendly and caring.

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At the White House, President Barack Obama said “Egyptians have inspired us.” He noted the important questions that lay ahead, but said, “I’m confident the people of Egypt can find the answers.”

Partisan politics aside from my point, Obama is in trouble with this event.

During the 2008 elections, his opponents were making the claim that he had no foreign relations experience and that this was his weak point. It seems that for the next election, whoever runs agains him in his party of rht Rep. will dub him as the "man who lost Egypt."

Also, if from now until Sept. when elections are to be held in Egypt, and it seems like the radicals may gain a huge bloc in whatever government forms in Egypt, this will crush Obama in the polls, and also will have a negative affect on Hillary Clinton. If she decides to quit her post (I say that decision will probably be made by mid summer), she too will also be hit with incompetence in handling the Egypt situation. I am sure if she runs for the Democratic nomination, she will say she was :only following orders" but this does not look well for her.

It should be interesting to watch, and I hope that the people of Egypt can solve out their issues.

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I refuse to be intimidated by all this fearmongering regarding the Muslim Brotherhood. This is a great day for Egypt, whatever may come tomorrow.

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Alphaape: "I too had wanted to see the pyramids, but now I guess I just have to watch them from the National Geographic channel."

One of the first things Egypt is going to do after establishing an interim government is getting tourism on the mend; it is a MAJOR source of income for the nation, and there's no way they're going to bar people from seeing the pyramids and what have you. I wouldn't go TOMORROW or anything (though it's probably be a cheap ticket! haha), but you'll be fine once things settle down a bit.

As for the 'president who lost Egypt'; what a load of crap! But yes, I have seen ultra-rightists already trying to spin it this way. The same thing would have happened on anyone else's watch, same as it happened with Iran on Carter's. This is not the result of Obama getting into office, it's the result of the will of the people, many of whom have been oppressed, jobless, and downright poor for SOME TIME now. The 21 year old kid quoted in this article who said, "THis is the first time in my life I feel free!" Do you think he is blaming this on or thanking Obama? NO. It has no relation!

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I'm actually saddened that the military has taken control of the country. I don't have much faith that this is a soft coup where it is only a temporary arrangement. I fear it is a hard coup by the Egyptian military just dressed up for now as benign and that in the long run will resemble more of the Military Juntas in South America during the 70's and 80's. I truly fear that we aren't seeing Democracy being born but Democracy just being delayed instead. I do hope that the Egyptian people are strong enough, wise enough and love freedom enough to be able to rise up again, if the Military refuses to take its proper place as servants of the people instead of now being masters of it in the near future as her people bravely seek liberty and freedom.

I do hope I am wrong and the Military does have the peoples desires at heart. Though man being man and power is a deep seduction that once obtained is not given up easily I fear this will not be the case. Going to be very interesting how this will finally go in the near future.

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Very interesting to see the military not automatically backing the govt., considering the latter is the paymaster of the former.

I'm just wondering what do the people think is going to take the govt.'s place?

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As the story fades from prominence in the major news outlets as it undoubtedly will in the coming weeks we should all keep a close watch on this.

And what is so wrong in visiting an Islamic State?

Being kidnapped or targeted for execution.

Out of my personal experience, I can only say that I enjoyed my stay there more than in any other so called democratic country.

Never base judgment on observations of the best parts of a country, namely the resorts and well maintained tourist attractions. Best advice if you’re a foreigner in the Middle East; grow a beard, keep your eyes down, and wear what everyone else is wearing. Only place in the world my boss is afraid to run his mouth and that, in itself, is a little scary.

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Wow, so much uninformed speculation. Keep in mind a couple of things:

About half the Egyptian military's budget comes from the US (so while they'll look out for their own interests, to be sure, they'll also want to keep the US minimally happy and the money flowing).

Egypt does not have oil. They can not afford the luxury of rabid revolution.

They have Pyramids and history. They can not afford to scare off visitors.

I've been to an semi-authoritarian Islamic country (Malaysia), and had a fine time. It doesn't have to mean kidnapping and/or trumped up spying charges.

Everyone take a deep breath and chill out :)

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Just for the record, my personal opinion is that President Obama handled this about as best as could be expected given all the complicated circumstances involved and the rapid changes in the situation over there. I give him and his foreign policy team credit on this one. This would have been an extreme challenge for any President to be able to balance our strategic interests against the obvious desires of the Egyptian people to change their current regime. He did well in striking that balance and meeting that challenge in my opinion.

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I've been to an semi-authoritarian Islamic country (Malaysia), and had a fine time. It doesn't have to mean kidnapping and/or trumped up spying charges.

@thorgrimfile: I too have been to Malaysia, and true one can have a great time there, provided you stay in the main tourist areas and don't get too far in the weeds. After all, they had a protest there (article was posted here too) about a person who wanted to get the relgion changed from Muslim to Christian, and many wanted her put to death under the blasphemy charge, or the case where the woman was to get lashes (again posted on thie forum), who was a Muslim and decided to drink a beer.

The difference is the radicals will probably have more of a voice in the aftermath of what has happened in Egypt. The question to ask is would you insure a vaction tour going to Egypt in the next few months? If you did, you would probably charge high rates, and that is what will drive the tour companies to try to stay away. I am sure the resorts along the Nile/Red Sea will probably beef up security, but I still wouldn't go.

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This is not the result of Obama getting into office, it's the result of the will of the people, many of whom have been oppressed, jobless, and downright poor for SOME TIME now.

@smithinjapan: No it is not a result of Obama but he is the man in charge in America, and it is on his watch. Just like they said Bush was asleep at the wheel when the financial crisis happend (it was not his job ot watch every financial transaction), but it was on his watch.

Funny, how two years ago, Obama went to Cario to give his first speech. If we had such a bad taste for Mubarak then, why go to his home town? If I remember the speech, no mention was made about the need for change in Egypt at the time. So, it does make him look bad, just as it was when Bush said we will bring democracy to Iraq, and look at the mess we are in there.

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About half the Egyptian military's budget comes from the US (so while they'll look out for their own interests, to be sure, they'll also want to keep the US minimally happy and the money flowing).

Agreed, but that is also fraught with some pretty bad implications in the long run. We will support a Military Junta not because we really like it but it will be better than having a regime that would be opposed to our interests, our interests are mainly keeping the peace treaty with Israel and Egypt adhered to and intact and keeping the Suez canal open for all international trade. So we will be once again in the unenviable position in the future as being cast as supporting Military Junta's as we did in South America for so many years. Giving those that hate America plenty of fodder once again to cry "America Imperialists" or "Death to America" in the future as their continued rallying cry.

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I have travelled extensively, off the beaten track in non-luxurious resorts in Indonesia, Malaysia, Egypt, Morocco, Tunesia, Turkey (if you can call that Islamic country), Lebanon, Jordan, Syria and Pakistan. I never had a problem visiting those countries. This anti-Islam bashing is really getting ridiculous. Not everyone is a kidnapper, as a matter of fact only a handful are. I don't see any reason for normal Egyptians to attack tourists now. You might run bigger chances of getting attacked in the US, the only country I got attacked anyway.

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This anti-Islam bashing is really getting ridiculous. Not everyone is a kidnapper, as a matter of fact only a handful are.

@Foxie: When I posted, I did not say that Muslims will start kidnapping tourist in Egypt, but let's just face a few facts. If you go to Egypt, where the population is 90% or greater Muslim, if you get kidnapped, it will probably be by a Muslim. As your post suggeste, it will only be a handful, but the odds are they will not be a Christian or Hindu.

The acts of the Muslim Brotherhood, but shooting a group of tourist in 1999 is what concerns people. The fact that no massive blood shed occured during this time is good, but let's let the dust settle, and start seeing what group will start setting off bombs across Egypt to get their point across.

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Celebrate today and in the next day people will realize they will still have to work to pay tax, levy,duty ;never-ending bills of education, gas ,car ,house ,food ,water,insurance..etc.

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Agree with tclh.

Life goes one just the same + the uncertainty what the new goverment will bring.

In the long run people are happy if they can survive the everyday grind without too much hassles and worries.

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Sail, amazingly in this case, I disagree with you - I think Obama overstepped the mark. He was borderline demanding Mubarek quit. Actually, come to think of it, it was an EXTREMELY delicate situation where he would have been criticized for coming on too strong, or saying nothing. He actually treaded the middle road fine line very well...so actually, I take back my original comment - I agree with you. :-)

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Revolution won't raise their IQs or change the distrust that pervades Egyptian society and creates a country where the underground economy is essentially the largest financial sector. I still say there aint no happy ending in sight.

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@Alphaape: maybe you should google 'shooting of tourists in Florida' and you would be surprised whether Egypt or the US is safer and the odds are that they were not Muslim. So, wherever you go, there will always be somewhere lunatics who will endanger others even here in Japan. Just look at that poor man working in the forest a few days ago in Hokkaido and being shot by 2 hunters who are now on the run. It has nothing to do with religion.

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He actually treaded the middle road fine line very well...so actually, I take back my original comment - I agree with you. :-)

Sushi,

There is a very fine point that others have shown though. I believe President Obama did blow it by not throwing his whole hearted support to the Iranians that got their heads cracked by doing what the the Egyptians just did now awhile back.

Let us hope that maybe this uprising by the Egyptians for their freedom will rekindle that in Iran and that President Obama if the situation arises again there where they they take to the street. That we can show those in Iran that those that stand for freedom can count on us also to support them.

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Life goes one just the same + the uncertainty what the new goverment will bring.

Yeah, that's very true. Until now, they had the absolute certainly that they will get royally screwed. Now, they don't know.

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@Alphaape " @Foxie: When I posted, I did not say that Muslims will start kidnapping tourist in Egypt, but let's just face a few facts. If you go to Egypt, where the population is 90% or greater Muslim,"

...maybe you need to face facts!!! and check out how much of the population is really muslim or secular before posting narrow minded waffle

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At the White House, President Barack Obama said “Egyptians have inspired us.

Not really, Mr. President. You are an inspiration to the rest of the world. And every one is, and will always be thankful to you. And of course not forgetting the American people for having been wise enough to have chosen you to be their President.

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I'm actually saddened that the military has taken control of the country.

I'm not. If they weren't there imagine the power vacuum and the bickering that could go on with different groups and some strongarm group appears from the woodwork to try to seize control at that time. I'm glad they are there to provide security. I don't care who ends up running the country as long as there are no extreme idiots like Chavez or whatnot. A more levelheaded person like Mubarak was that will maintain the peaceful status quo is desirable. One thing I do wonder about though is all those saying Mubarak stole from the country, do they have any proof of that or is this typical exaggeration as usual that we hear from those who assume a lot about governments and conspiracies by them?

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It is all about ObamaChange now -even if Obama has nothing to do with it. =You are seeing the Globalists/Libs/Socialists/fascists getting attacked and the people winning. In America you had the tea party and in Egypt it was 99% of the population.

Let's all start farming and help lower food costs (40% of income cost in Egypt). This also helps attack the food speculators (Soros etc). Not supporting fiat dollars thru barter helps also.

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Now comes the hard part....

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Billgates - Not really, Mr. President. You are an inspiration to the rest of the world. And every one is, and will always be thankful to you. And of course not forgetting the American people for having been wise enough to have chosen you to be their President.

Hahahaha. No he isn't. While the Obama administration certainly did the right thing by not getting involved, that doesn't prove any type of leadership only that he didn't know what to do or was incapable of doing anything. Again.

The Obama Whitehouse responded more to the current polls and to the ever changing conditions in Egypt. Looking back -

On Tuesday the Obama Administration asked Hosni Mubarak to step aside.

On Wednesday they said that transitioning power “now means yesterday.”

On Saturday morning the Obama Administration said Mubarak must stay.

On Saturday evening the Obama Administration said Mubarak should step aside.

On Sunday Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Mubarak must stay in power.

The following Tuesday the Obama Administration said that political reform will be a gradual process.

In Texas they have a unique saying for someone like Obama. He's "all hat and no cattle" which means he looks like a cowboy, talks like a cowboy, walks like a cowboy but has never seen a cow in his life and would know what to do with one if he did.

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You are giving Obama alot of credit for someone that just reads the tele-prompt.

The Egyptian people get all the credit for this. -They are making ObamaChange into something their own and a complete reverse from the "ObamaAgenda"

Just like with all Gore's Global Warming = people are going green, buying solar panels, riding the bike, walking, growing foods etc. (not using gas/oil/electricity) ==this is the opposite of what Al (jet-set) Gore wanted.

The people are outsmarting the politicians/media and financial terrorists here. -You should give them credit.

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In Texas they have a unique saying for someone like Obama. He's "all hat and no cattle" which means he looks like a cowboy, talks like a cowboy, walks like a cowboy

If people in Texas believe that President Obama looks like a cowboy and talks like a cowboy, they are in serious need of his health care plan -- because their sight and hearing are plainly shot.

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Um, folks with a political axe to grind: Obama(mania) had nothing to do with this. But how much pressure from the White House (and/or State Department/Pentagon/etc.) really effected things, well, I suppose we'll never really know (baring another surprising Wikileak!).

But if you think a hypothetical "President Palin (or some other wingnut)" would have some how handled things better - HA HA HA HA HA! Oh wait, I forgot to figure the power of divine intervention ;)

As for folks ranting about how Obama didn't do the same for Iran (regardless of the fact that we have no idea what pressure this administration applied in Egypt, or what pressure it may have tried to apply in Iran two years back), stop trying to compare apples and oranges!

The Mubarak regime, corrupt and repressive as it was, was tied to the West. It had to play by certain rules (no Tienanmen Square allowed - I mean, you might try thugs on camels whipping folks, etc., but no wholesale slaughter by the army).

But the Iranians (and, for future reference, the Syrians, Libyans, and such, who are not beholden to the West at all) play by different rules - they have no problems unleashing the "revolutionary guards" (armies of thugs employed by the tyrannical government) to stomp the crap out of any genuine revolution!

So whining that Obama didn't somehow do the same for Iran is a ridiculous argument - he had and has no real leverage there - bastards like Ahmadinejad have no compunction about crushing protesters with brutal force. There's little the US/Europe/Japan/etc. could do to influence that outcome (versus the critical leverage available in the Egyptian situation).

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yabits - If people in Texas believe that President Obama looks like a cowboy and talks like a cowboy, they are in serious need of his health care plan -- because their sight and hearing are plainly shot.

Good point. Referring to someone as "all hat and no cattle" means that person is a fraud. They are pretending to be someone they are not.

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Going to be interesting with the Army in control, but what about the leaders of different riot groups, for are they left out in the dark or are some voted into the Government positions?

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I never had a problem visiting those countries.

I guess I'm just jaded from being tailed by police and dealing with a hotel evacuation due to a bomb threat.

This anti-Islam bashing is really getting ridiculous

Oh I've got no problem with Islam but I do get a little miffed when I'm followed or put in harms way in the ordinary course of business. And to date that only has happened in Islamic states.

You might run bigger chances of getting attacked in the US, the only country I got attacked anyway.

To be fair I've never actually been mugged in the Middle East. Europe, and specifically France, holds the most attempted muggings on my person at 12. Though it might have something to do with the aformentioned police following me, not sure.

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Going to be interesting with the Army in control, but what about the leaders of different riot groups, for are they left out in the dark or are some voted into the Government positions?

If you honestly think that any ol person from the street can be part of a government then I wouldn't want to live in that kind of country. I hope Egypt isn't that kind of country or else it'll be going much further backwards.

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arrestpaul: While the Obama administration certainly did the right thing by not getting involved

Obama has to get involved. He's president of the US and the US has ties to Egypt. He just has to walk through a minefield to do it. He needs to work behind the scenes to help create change while publicly making it seem like he's making the right choices all the time. Mubarak is gone, US public image on the whole seems positive, and the US still has influence in Egypt. What more can the guy do?

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...maybe you need to face facts!!! and check out how much of the population is really muslim or secular before posting narrow minded waffle

@888naf: Doing a bit of research as you suggest, I came across the following:

Egypt is a predominantly Sunni Muslim country with Islam as its state religion. The percentage of the adherents of various religions is a controversial topic in Egypt, with different sources citing different figures. Around 90% are identified as Muslim. Cairo is famous for its numerous mosque minarets and is justifiably dubbed "the city of 1,000 minarets"

There is a significant minority of Christians in Egypt, who make up between 5% and 10% of the population.

According to the constitution of Egypt, any new legislation must at least implicitly agree with Islamic law; however, the constitution bans political parties with a religious agenda

@Alphaape: maybe you should google 'shooting of tourists in Florida' and you would be surprised whether Egypt or the US is safer and the odds are that they were not Muslim.

@Foxie: Look at what I wrote above. Ans yes I am aware that wherever yo ugo, you have the chance to get robbed or attacked. It's an international problem. But at least in Fla, if you get robbed, it is by a person who is looking for money or valuables; and not by an organized group that wants to hold you for ransom, or attack you simply because you may be a different religion.

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Cries of “Egypt is free” rang out.

SuperLib - Obama has to get involved. He's president of the US and the US has ties to Egypt. He just has to walk through a minefield to do it. He needs to work behind the scenes to help create change while publicly making it seem like he's making the right choices all the time. Mubarak is gone, US public image on the whole seems positive, and the US still has influence in Egypt. What more can the guy do?

Frist off, this is a victory for the Egyptian people. Egyptians have forced a change in their leadership/government. Egyptians are now in a position to create a democracy, fall under military rule or to allow a theocracy to control their lives in the future. Their choice, their future, their actions.

Why do you insist on giving Obama credit for inaction? Standing on the sidelines and cheering for both sides is NOT a foreign policy. The Whitehouse and State Department were also caught unaware by this uprising. Not prepared and unaware. What a great example of leadership.....

Give credit where credit is due but don't waste you're time trying to pad the resume of a disinterested and clueless observer.

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