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Fort Hood suspect was told: 'There's something wrong with you'

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im not surprised.

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Hasan reportedly jumped up on a desk and shouted “Allahu akbar!”—Arabic for “God is great!”

Sounds about right.

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Compare and contrast:

Former President George W Bush and his wife, Laura, visited wounded soldiers Friday night at the post hospital.

Meanwhile:

Obama would attend a memorial service Tuesday at Fort Hood.

Instead of giving "shout out" speeches in Washington, Obama should have immediately been on AF-1 bound for Texas. Welcome to his "My Pet Goat" moment.

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Motivation of killer is very clear. Read on . . . .

This from www.hotair.com (Excerpted from Telegraph)

"Hasan, the sole suspect in the massacre of 13 fellow US soldiers in Texas, attended the controversial Dar al-Hijrah mosque in Great Falls, Virginia, in 2001 at the same time as two of the September 11 terrorists, The Sunday Telegraph has learnt. His mother’s funeral was held there in May that year. The preacher at the time was Anwar al-Awlaki, an American-born Yemeni scholar who was banned from addressing a meeting in London by video link in August because he is accused of supporting attacks on British troops and backing terrorist organisations. Hasan’s eyes “lit up” when he mentioned his deep respect for al-Awlaki’s teachings, according to a fellow Muslim officer at the Fort Hood base in Texas, the scene of Thursday’s horrific shooting spree."

Hotair commentary followed by more from Telegraph:

"More from the Telegraph piece via another Muslim soldier known as Richard, who was friends with Hasan and who talked about him to a mutual acquaintance, Kamran Pasha:"

"Richard had previously argued with Hasan when he said that he felt the “war on terror” was really a war against Islam, expressed anti-Jewish sentiments and defended suicide bombings. “I asked Richard whether he believed that Hasan was motivated by religious radicalism in his murderous actions,” Mr Pasha said. “Richard, with great sadness, said that he believed this was true. He also believed that psychological factors from Hasan’s job as an army psychiatrist added to his pathos. The news that he would be deployed overseas, to a war that he rejected, may have pushed him over the edge."

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Hasan, said he told classmates he was “a Muslim first and an American second.”

He should never have been in uniform.

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Great read, ashika1009.

Shame Americans have to get information like this from sources outside the U.S.

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DHS was too busy with the White House request that they trail and harass and investigate all those dangerous retirees and ordinary working folk organizing tea parties to protest the 3 trillion dollar Obamacare nightmare. Good work, prez.

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True dat, victimcrat.

What's more, how did Obama pay tribute to those killed and wounded at Fort Hood by a fellow Muslim? He went to Camp David to play golf.

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Welcome to his "My Pet Goat" moment.

Really? You compare the tragedy at Ft. Hood with 9/11? The only thing you fanatics do is trivialize 9/11.

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"Muslims"

They have caused untold misery for millions.

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Hehehohohaha

Really? You compare the tragedy at Ft. Hood with 9/11?

LOL. You do have a point, 9/11 and this incident aren't even in the same league. The Ft. Hood shooting pales in comparison to 9/11 but it's about the only crisis of its kind that Obama's had to react to. And he still came up short...

Moderator: No further references to 9/11, please.

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But Finnell said no one filed a formal, written complaint about Hasan’s comments out of fear of appearing discriminatory.

Now that's a problem. We need to swing the pendulum back a little in the other direction.

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He should never have been in uniform.

He's tried hard to get out of it for the past 8 years.

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He should never have been in uniform. He's tried hard to get out of it for the past 8 years.

Kind of makes you wonder why there were no red flags raised (or addressed) when a muslim soldier objected to going to where he might have to fight other muslims. Did he have to go to Afghanistan? America has bases all over the world. Of course that would raise questions of favoritism (or political correctness). Tough problem, but regardless it should have been addressed much earlier.

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All you Liberals that take no responsibility for your actions make me sick. This man was put in a tough mental position and it broke him. He also knew that it would break him and tried to get out -he could not. Now all the Libs want to throw him under the bus and label him a "terrorist"

Under the circumstances he did the best he could. Do not go into these "wars" if you refuse to take responsibility. The populace will always pay the highest price in any war, next to them is the soldier.

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All you Liberals that take no responsibility for your actions make me sick.

Ah the phantom liberals ... who are they? I thought it was the fanatical rightists who were quick to label the shooter as a terrorist.

Do enlisted soldiers have a choice about going to war once their deployment orders have been given? I always thought that enlisting is not the same as joining a company where you can walk away if conditions got too harsh.

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It would not have been discrimination if he was posted to Afghanistan or Iraq. Since he had plenty of experience treating Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome from soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, that would make him very well qualified to do counseling closer to the area of operations, where sometimes proper psychiatric care is not available.

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RomeoRamenII at 01:39 PM JST - 8th November True dat, victimcrat. What's more, how did Obama pay tribute to those killed and wounded at Fort Hood by a fellow Muslim? He went to Camp David to play golf.

True dat? Is your "true dat" an attempt to rib the President because he is Black? You may want to listen to him some more, he does not speak like that.

Very interesting quote you put there. I see your trying to blame the president for not flying to Fort Hood right after the attack. But, if he would have flown there I bet you would have tried to say he was just there for a photo op....Sad

RomeoRamenII at 11:29 AM JST - 8th November Instead of giving "shout out" speeches in Washington, Obama should have immediately been on AF-1 bound for Texas. Welcome to his "My Pet Goat" moment.

You are attempting to compare the attacks of Sept 11th with the attacks on our forces at Fort Hood? That is truly sad....

Tragic yes but this was something that we could not prevent. September 11th 2001 could have been prevented. Very very sad statement there, that is all I can say about your comment, very sad.

Moderator: No further references to 9/11 please.

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JoeBigs

True dat? Is your "true dat" an attempt to rib the President because he is Black? You may want to listen to him some more, he does not speak like that.

Take a chill pill dude. A word of advice, you shouldn't overreact like this and play the race card prematurely. You should definitely save it for later when you'll really need it to defend Obama.

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" Hasan, said he told classmates he was “a Muslim first and an American second.” "

The only thing surprising about that is that ignorant Westerners find it surprising. In fact, this is basic islamic doctrine. If you join islam, you become memeber of the islamic nation, the ummah, and that is where your first loyalty belongs, and not with any particular nation.

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Fort Hood suspect was told: 'There's something wrong with you'

Apparently those people were right.

Taka

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Seems strange that Obama is waiting until Tuesday to return to Fort Hood considering he had a town hall meeting there about a year ago when he was running for office. Appears his visit that time was just words, just speeches.

His insensitivity to this situation proves once more that because he's a CinC who's never served his country in uniform he has no clue as to what being a part of the U.S. military family is all about.

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It is evident from the article that the Army chain-of-command received clear indications of the incompatility of Hasan's views with military service. In keeping him in his position, the Army was clearly conflicted between its own need for more psychiatrists (partially a numbers game) and what Army people genuinely need: to able to trust their fellow soldiers. The Army command's inability to weigh in on the proper side of an ethical dilemma has produced some very tragic statistics.

Part of the great need for psychiatrists to help heal the damage of the killing business comes about through the severe mental conflict that often preys on individuals who reject attempt by authority to implant the idea that God and religious belief must somehow become subordinate when those beliefs come into conflict with military duty. Especially when duty involves serving in wars that can only be called "just" in the eyes of the true believers in war.

Many of the opponents in the Middle East take people from a young age and implant the idea that killing the enemy is one's religious duty. Not much of a chance for internal mental anguish in that setting. Especially when their recruiters and handlers can point to clear examples of how the West is treating this as a war against Islam.

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[Osman] Danquah assumed the military’s chain of command knew about Hasan’s doubts, which had been known for more than a year to classmates in a graduate military medical program. His fellow students complained to the faculty about Hasan’s “anti-American propaganda,” but said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim student kept officers from filing a formal written complaint.

Well done, political correctness. Thirteen dead due to sensitivity.

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There is something seriously wrong with the Islamic religion that makes its followers do things like this.

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Well, Willib made a very valid point. I've even heard that phrase before as well. Hasan like many others in the same mindset, put their religion before even their humanity. Somehow it seems many other religions don't have this problem as much... I wonder why?

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People are so quick to blame an entire religion for the actions of overzealous fundamentalist few. Please keep in mind that there are 1.6 BILLION believers of Islam in the world, most of whom are regular people just trying to live their lives like everyone else.

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There are also ARMIES that are fighting these FEW religious extremists as well in various countries. Yes there are many that are just trying to live their own lives and mind their own business, but there are also more than a few thousand if not 10 thousand or more (which is probably still and underestimate) extremists and fundamentalists. How much is too much from one single religious ideology before it sinks in that something is drastically wrong there? Hasan is just one among many.

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He really shouldn't have been in the military, even his friends and family told him it wasn't a good idea. I used have a dorm mate with a man that was just like him. Very confrontational about his religious beliefs. If he didn't get his way he'd get angry and put his beliefs before everything else. Especially expecting the classes to adapt to wait while he fufilled his prayer obligations... My uncle also doesn't seem to

The main problem is the majority put their religion before everything else because they percieve it as Gods Law and complete and total Truth that everyone (not just themselves) should obey. This kind of thinking absolutely does not fit with the US Military rules. As they say "prepare to die for your COUNTRY" Because your supposed to be servicing and protecting all the citizens of that country, not your own personal religious beliefs.

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His insensitivity to this situation proves once more that because he's a CinC who's never served his country in uniform he has no clue as to what being a part of the U.S. military family is all about.

RR: So you are suggesting that every time something bad happens to the US military the CinC has to come and hold its hand.

because he's a CinC who's never served his country in uniform he has no clue as to what being a part of the U.S. military family is all about.

Yeah it was so rude for him to go to Dover and salute those who died in battle.

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realist: There is something seriously wrong with the Islamic religion that makes its followers do things like this.

We could also say that there is something seriously wrong with America that makes her citizens either supportive or indifferent to wontonly starting wars that get heaps of innocents killed.

Interestingly, Hasan was both a follower of Islam and an American citizen!

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The main problem is the majority put their religion before everything else because they percieve it as Gods Law and complete and total Truth that everyone (not just themselves) should obey. This kind of thinking absolutely does not fit with the US Military rules. As they say "prepare to die for your COUNTRY"

This is the essential dilemma. And it is ages old, and confronts adherents of nearly every religion.

The military-nationalist view is to subordinate the laws of God to the needs of the nation and its military. When the leaders of a nation use its military to enter into wars that are not just, the internal strains become far more severe.

I strongly believe it was very tempting for the Army to have, as a counselor, a devout Moslem who might be able to reason the correctness of killing other Moslems -- many innocent -- in the same fashion that some Christian chaplains bless the instruments of killing, while others conscientiously object.

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starting wars that get heaps of innocents killed.

Most of the dead from the war were due to Muslim on Muslim violence after years of one Muslim group dominating another Muslim group.

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a devout Moslem who might be able to reason the correctness of killing other Moslems

I should think it would not be too hard. Muslims kill other Muslims all the time just as Christians kill other Christians. All you got to do is say they are of a different sect and then...Shazam! They are no longer fit to live!

I think the U.S. military is just desperate for bodies, especially warm ones. And it goes a way in explaining Lyndie England (probably Christian) to the guys who raped and murdered 14 year old Abeer Qassim Hamza al-Janabi (probably all those guys are Christians) and murdered her family too, and all the way up to this guy Hasan.

But I have no doubt the ever duplicitous rightists here will say the first two cases were stress and the last was just Islam! Could not have anything to do with the state of the U.S. military or being in two unfounded wars! No No! That would undermine all the violence and ruin their fun!

Moderator: Stay on topic please.

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USNinJapan2 at 12:29 PM JST - 8th November Hasan, said he told classmates he was “a Muslim first and an American second.” He should never have been in uniform.

I for one agree with you.

Many people put their religious views over their countries needs. Be their religion Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Wiccan. Anyone that puts their religion above their countries needs, really should not be wearing the uniform.

If you put it on you agree to serve the nation, no matter what must be done. Nation comes before religion every time.

Spoken like a true American patriot!

Well said USNinJapan2! Bravo Zulu to you!

USNinJapan2 at 10:07 PM JST - 8th November Take a chill pill dude. A word of advice, you shouldn't overreact like this and play the race card prematurely. You should definitely save it for later when you'll really need it to defend Obama.

Overreacting? No just asking a question.

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Many people put their religious views over their countries needs.

And, for any country which purports to believe in the freedom of the individual conscience, the right of a person to decide for himself who they will serve first and foremost will be honored.

If you put it on you agree to serve the nation, no matter what must be done. Nation comes before religion every time.

You seem to be saying what the U.S. military never could: "In case of any conflict of conscience, you must renounce your religion or give up your uniform." From what I've been reading about the building of mega-churches on military bases and some of the commanders exhorting troops to hand out bible tracts to the lands we are occupying, it appears there is an effort underway to mesh the military with Christianity.

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Many people put their religious views over their countries needs.

If everybody did, and everybody worshipped a mainstream religion, and everybody understood and practiced the core of those religions, then the need for militaries would disappear! Therefore, I have no problems with people putting their religions ahead of their country's needs. Countries don't have rules about killing people of other nations. In fact, they often sanction it! In fact, its this very idea that allows Christian nations to wage war in foreign lands!

The trouble with this guy is that he either did not understand or practice core Muslim belief. And its the same with all Muslims commiting similar acts, and Christians too.

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I fear this outburst of violence at Ft Hood, as the presidently so eloquently put it, will serve to radicalize some Americans.

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@Yabits, there is nothing wrong with putting ones religion before their countries needs within reason. America does allow this to work with peoples beliefs within reason. If a satanist believes they need to drink the blood of a baby to honor their religion should they be allowed to do it? Of course not! Because it over steps what the US and other western and many other countries understand to be a violation of basic human rights. That is where the line is drawn.

There would have been no problem if Hasan didn't believe in the wars that all he should have done was just state his reasons, just gone AWOL and just had to deal with a dishonorable discharge maybe some prison time in regards to breach of contract or w/e the military puts on him. But instead he decided to kill people under the twisted perception (gee now where did that come from?) that a martyr instigates murder then is persecuted for his beliefs and killed. As I said before, yes there are religious fanatics everywhere. But only one religion is percieved to be hostile enough to have more than "a small group" of religious fanatics banding together because of their beliefs only whose actions if you've forgotton, seem to be able to get legitimate military action from and in various nations to rise and defend their own lands. If this was only involving 1 or two countries I can understand, but not when its affecting at least 11+ countries. Last I checked even the IRA was only concerned about Ireland's seperation from the UK, not the whole section of the hemisphere.

PC and tolerance will only go so far, and I'm pretty sure its gone past a lot of peoples boiling points. There is no excuse for radicalism, but the entire picture on this is not black and white, but a very screwed up and extremely contradictory field of grey.

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Yabits: And, for any country which purports to believe in the freedom of the individual conscience, the right of a person to decide for himself who they will serve first and foremost will be honored.

Well, his choice was honored, and now we have 13 dead and 29 wounded. Congrats.

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“I’ve known my brother Nidal to be a peaceful, loving and compassionate person who has shown great interest in the medical field and in helping others,” said his brother, Eyad Hasan, of Sterling, Va, in a statement. “He has never committed an act of violence and was always known to be a good, law-abiding citizen.”

Never say never.

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This is precisely the sort of jihadist attack that the Western world, and the US in particular, should be defending itself, rather than waste precious resources on missions impossible in the Hindukush.

But instead, our media tell us that the jihad has nothing to do with the jihadist attack, and we should look the other way. They are all firmly stuck on September 10.

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Well, his choice was honored, and now we have 13 dead and 29 wounded. Congrats.

Well, his choice was to request to leave the military. His wish was not honored and now we have 13 dead and 29 wounded. Congrats.

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Yabits:

" Well, his choice was to request to leave the military. His wish was not honored and now we have 13 dead and 29 wounded. Congrats. "

Even better than that. First, the US military spent a few hundred thousand bucks to educate him. As a thank you, they get a spontaneous Jihad attack that kills over a dozen people. And NOW, they pay for his medical treatment, and subsequently, they will have to pay for his legal expense and after that for years of detention, tying up more resources.

You could not wish for a better demonstration of how effective the jihadist ideology works against modern Western states.

No wonder that radical imams are already gloating of this.

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Yabits, there is nothing wrong with putting ones religion before their countries needs within reason. America does allow this to work with peoples beliefs within reason. If a satanist believes they need to drink the blood of a baby to honor their religion should they be allowed to do it? Of course not! Because it over steps what the US and other western and many other countries understand to be a violation of basic human rights. That is where the line is drawn.

Those words "within reason" open up a large gray area. There are many examples of the state barring forms of religious expression and belief -- the use of peyote and polygamy -- which don't harm others as in your extreme example. But, back on topic...

There would have been no problem if Hasan didn't believe in the wars that all he should have done was just state his reasons, just gone AWOL and just had to deal with a dishonorable discharge maybe some prison time in regards to breach of contract or w/e the military puts on him.

So that's his choice? The military bears no responsiblity for screening someone unfit for service, and looking the other way when the unfitness manifests itself on many occasions? If they are going to be that irresponsible, why would people be surprised when events like this happen?

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The trouble with this guy is that he either did not understand or practice core Muslim belief. And its the same with all Muslims commiting similar acts, and Christians too.

The "Christian" acts that come to mind are the slayings of abortion doctors, and bombings of clinics where abortions are performed. And starting wars of convenience where so many innocent people are killed -- and was the action at the root of Hasan's difficulties.

The irony of your statement comes with the reminder of the billions of U.S. dollars that have gone to fund the spread of some of the most radical strains of Islam in some of the places we are now fighting.

I totally agree with the statement you made. Both Christians and Muslims have denied the roots of their respective faiths and are actually following the influence of the "one" who would have all of humanity at each others throats.

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Even better than that. First, the US military spent a few hundred thousand bucks to educate him. As a thank you, they get a spontaneous Jihad attack that kills over a dozen people.

You appear to be saying that the US military put a higher value on trying to recoup its investment in an unfit soldier than it did on the safety of its other troops. Not only were they not prepared to honor Hasan's own admission of unfitness, they were going to ship him right out where he would have to confront the demons that had taken hold of him.

As another thread puts it, when the U.S. misuses its power to the extent it has, and starts wars of convenience which kill thousands of innocent people, perhaps it should not surprise us that this is the thanks we get.

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Yabits: The "Christian" acts that come to mind are the slayings of abortion doctors and bombings of clinics where abortions are performed.

I think those acts are similar, where one takes a radical form of religion that leads to premeditated murder, but it doesn't really describe the problem which is the sheer number of jihadists vs. doctor killers. Obviously there is something that is creating this type of mentality in a lot more Muslims than everyone else.

I can't say I know a lot about all the different religions in the world, but like I've said before I think Islam more of a total commitment than other religions. If someone is already in the mindset to completely give himself to a religion then maybe it's easier to manipulate that individual into doing something like this when good religion goes bad. Add to that the fact that there are those who actively seek to recruit people down that wrong path, they train them, etc. I'm guessing there probably aren't too people using Christianity to recruit others into blowing up abortion clinics.

I know you like to push the US military and war angle but it doesn't add up. Over the last few years the number of Westerners killed by suicide bombers is a drop in the bucket compared to the number of Muslims killed by suicide bombers. Look at Pakistan, look at Mumbai. Suicide bombers in Iraq don't target Americans, they target Muslims. We've seen attacks in Turkey, Egypt, assassinations in Kuwait and Iran...all targeting Muslims. If anything, attacks on Westerners is the exception rather than the rule. I think people who are quick to label Islam as the problem don't take the time to see that Muslims are suffering from radical Islam more than anyone else. Islam itself isn't the problem, it's those who manipulate others into their perverted form of Islam.

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I have to say it,

Islamic Radicals are self- loathing individuals and sexual prudes that need to get laid.

That is the root of the their violence, my opinion.

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@Yabits. I'm sorry I don't quite understand your way of thinking. Hasan had a CHOICE, and the one he chose cost people their lives and made him a murderer! What about that do you not understand? Now even if he gets prison it will be for LIFE. Think really hard about that.

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Did an interesting search on Google. Take the words Extremist, Radical and try and attach them to every religion in the world and do a search. Amazingly there is only one that seems to come up a lot more than others.

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HonestDictator-Did an interesting search on Google. Take the words Extremist, Radical and try and attach them to every religion in the world and do a search. Amazingly there is only one that seems to come up a lot more than others.

A lot of it is choice of wording really. Its just that Christians avoid tying the words to Christianity. I am sure Muslims play similar semantical games. Take the Branch Davidians for example. David Koresh claimed to be a prophet in the Judeo-Christian tradition and led a compound armed to the teeth. Anyone calling him and his extremists Christians? Nope. But they fit the bill. How about Timothy McVeigh setting off a bomb in Oklahoma City as revenge for the killings of the Branch Davidians? Is anyone calling it religious extremist terrorism? Nope. Even the Protestant on Catholic violence in and around Northern Ireland is termed more a political struggle than a religious one. But if you wanted to call it Christian extremism, it would be easy to make the case.

The other part of it is that in the west, our terrorists and mass murderers don't wear religion on their sleaves. But if they did, and all claimed to be Christians and yelled "God is great!" would you consider them to be real and true Christians? Probably not. So why do you take these guerrilla types who claim to be Muslim as serious Muslims? Why does the press? You are letting crazy people dicate to you and so are they.

Point of fact is that even Muslims are confused these days. The suicide bomber mystique is a fad in the Islamic world right now. Its become a part of culture, but not religion. Statements like yours only add to the confusion. We need to assist Muslims in denouncing the suicide bomber mentality by pointing out that it is against Islam rather than constantly making the false claim that it is. It makes an us vs. them mentality that actually helps the terrorists and paints us as enemies of Islam and it confuses Muslims. We all need to stop helping the terrorists asap.

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Obviously there is something that is creating this type of mentality in a lot more Muslims than everyone else.

At any point in time, the statistics will show that among religions there will be one that appears to have more internal strife than there is to be found among others. Because a relative handful of people are able to pervert and twist some of the precepts of a religion to find justification for heinous acts does not mean there is something wrong with the religion.

The question might be better put another way: What is there about the mentality and outlook of a people that renders them more susceptible to adopting a violent philosophy, or in seeing violence as providing the answer to their problems? (Using religion to justify violence against others is not exclusive to Islam.) Part of the answers can be found in long-standing animosities created by the colonial rulers of many of the places you named. (Such as putting a minority group in power over majority groups as was done by the British in Iraq.)

But to frame this as "something wrong with Islam" is completely wrong. Just as it would be wrong to frame the US Civil War and the European theater of WWII as "something wrong with the religion of Christ."

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I'm sorry I don't quite understand your way of thinking. Hasan had a CHOICE, and the one he chose cost people their lives and made him a murderer! What about that do you not understand?

Here's an example of a right-winger in a similar situation: Prior to starting the war in Iraq, Bush said that Saddam had "forced war on him." Of course, you know and I know that Bush always had the choice to back out right? But there was something ingrained in Bush's character that would not allow him to back out. So he made the choice to launch war and cost a lot of innocent people their lives.

War affects the minds of people in very severe and unpredictable ways. Hasan had to learn to deal with trying to help many of the victims of Bush's choice to visit war on innocent people -- as well as wrestle with his own demons that only became more tormenting the closer he got to that war.

To the extent that war -- especially wars perceived as purely discretionary and therefore unjust -- damages the minds of otherwise healthy people; to the extent that Hasan's damaged mind was become more and more evident to the soldiers around him, the victims of the shootings at Fort Hood are every bit victims of the large-scale war that Bush chose for the U.S.

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Yabits: At any point in time, the statistics will show that among religions there will be one that appears to have more internal strife than there is to be found among others.

Appears to have more internal strife? Appears? Am I missing reports of Christians killing in the name of a perverted form of Christianity? Did I miss a dozen abortion clinic bombings over the past 60 days? Both exist, but for you to claim that the difference in sheer numbers is inconsequential is a sign of radicalism on your part.

Because a relative handful of people are able to pervert and twist some of the precepts of a religion to find justification for heinous acts does not mean there is something wrong with the religion.

And here's where we agree, if you'd only let us agree. But in reality our agreement is of no value since you're only discussing this topic to bring up your main point:

Part of the answers can be found in long-standing animosities created by the colonial rulers of many of the places you named

This is, was, and always will be your point to make regardless of how the conversation begins. This is the only place where you will allow the conversation to end. You hate the West, you've radicalized yourself just as radical Muslims have, and you have shut your mind to any and all evidence that does not support the conclusion that you want to hear. At this point I recommend that you join the nearest Mosque and start training recruits. You aren't defending Islam, you're promoting radical Islam.

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This is the only place where you will allow the conversation to end. You hate the West, you've radicalized yourself just as radical Muslims have...

I happen to hate evil and injustice. To the extent that evil and injustice have been committed in my name as a fellow American, I speak out against that. As an American, I feel it more my duty to sweep in front of my own house first. If I have "radicalized myself" it is only because I see where a lack being just and merciful leads.

Those who want make up and to apply some mythical 60-day rule and pretend that history does not matter will find it difficult to accept that most of what occurs today is a reaction to what happened in the past.

History is much longer than what your picayune beliefs will allow you to accept in how others perceive it to be. This is the arrogance of the typical American. The American imperative seems to be "Just get over it" (or "that shouldn't matter now because I say it shouldn't") whenever clear evidence of past and current American/Western wrongdoing is brought to light.

Until, that is, Americans get their collective panties in a bind when something wrong that has been done unto them. Then it's "We will bomb you into oblivion," torture, preemptive wars, etc. And the cycle continues.

A very wise book, purported by many in the West to be their guide, talks of "reaping what you sow," and that "the sins of the fathers shall be visited" on generations yet to be born. Had people within the military establishment been wise and merciful in their dealings with Mr. Hasan, this tragedy might have been very easily avoided.

But Americans want to sow the wind and whine and complain when the whirilwind comes for them.

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Yep, you're a radical who justifies Jihad against America.

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"Had people within the military establishment been wise and merciful in their dealings with Mr. Hasan, this tragedy might have been very easily avoided."

You are from another planet.

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Do we even need psychiatrists? I am a health care provider(oral surgeon) and felt most psychiatrists are more psycho than the patients they are treating.

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