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U.S. boosts missile defense as N Korea warns of nuclear strike

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Still not scared.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Don't be scared, be prepared.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Amazing how the World seems to sit back and just listens to these statements, as if its of no consequence , "“The moment of explosion is approaching fast,” the North Korean military said, warning that war could break out “today or tomorrow”. Well they can't say they didn't warn anybody. If this conflict does escalate, which I hope for humanity never does, where will the blame lie ??? Will the finger be pointed solely at North Korea ??

1 ( +2 / -1 )

and all this after the Rodman visit. or was it that President Obama did not call? little Kim needs to take a chill pill.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Dum-dum is painting himself(and his lemmings) into a very small and dangerous corner. All they would have to do is detonate some small "dirty" bombs to wreak havoc. It's a dangerous mess.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This comment from CNN about this latest threat was so great I thought you all would like it.

Without an adequate supply of coke and mentos, it'll take the North months to get a single rocket off the ground. Jesse Lockhart

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Reuters and AFP appear to be out of kilter on this (judging by another article in JT). Kim Jong-un is presenting so many mixed messages it's baffling. He visits a school with his wife - aaaah. He oversees a massive military parade - ooer. He entertains a famous sportsman - woohoo. He presides over war maps and sizes up targets - boohoo. Unfortunately, I think he might put his money where his mouth is. I hope the above visits and meetings weren't on his bucket list...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"war could break out today or tomorrow"

The end of North Korea could be today or tomorrow.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Describing the Kaesong ban as “very regrettable”, South Korea’s Unification Ministry urged the North to normalize access immediately. “Otherwise,” the ministry warned, “not only will inter-Korean relations be negatively affected but North Korea will invoke greater criticism and isolation from the international community.”

It's nice that this guy is still holding on to hope, but I think the threat of increased criticism and isolation has about been played out. "Oh, no! Criticism!" Nah...it isn't going to work.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The end for North Korea is drawing near.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Sut this Kim chump up somebody. Clealy he is showing his lack of maturity.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Hi Craig How does one prepare?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Even though the North Koreans would suffer, we should stop all aid and help to this embarrassment to the human race. Why should we help a country that threatens us in such a way? Stopping aid would put a lot of pressure on North Korea, without being an "aggressive" move. If Tubbs keeps threatening the rest of the world, then stronger, aggressive measures would be acceptable.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I am sorry for the lengthy post. This is due to the dramatic events.

Tensions have soared on the Korean peninsula since December, when the North test launched a long-range rocket. In February, it upped the ante once again by conducting its third nuclear test.

Let us recall the main facts. I do not pretend to be an expert in Korean history, but here is the picture as I understand it:

1) Korea was under Japanese occupation between 1905 and 1945. A very nasty occupation.

2) Korea should have been freed when WWII ended. Naturally, there were various domestic political forces, on a full spectrum ranging from the far left to the far right. The Koreans were looking for their way to establish their own governance.

3) America did not heed the will of the Koreans to find their own path, and invaded to the southern part.

4) As a result, Korea was split between two states, one capitalist at the south and one socialist at the north.

5) A war broke out in 1950 and continued till 1953. America claims that the north attacked the south. The north claims that America provoked the war intentionally. Most victims, about 4,000,000 were in the north, which was flattened by the war.

6) In the period that followed there were bad times and good times. It even happened once that the north and south marched together at the opening of the Olympic Games. There was an interval during which the south was ruled by a fascist dictatorship, and there were other intervals during which the south was governed by leaders who pursued unification processes with the north.

7) There were diplomatic contacts between the north and America during the term of Bill Clinton. But no agreement was finalized because of the objection of the Congress.

8) The neoconservative George W. Bush came to power after Bill Clinton. He wanted a regime change in the north, and was considering a military attack.

9) Nevertheless, the six party talks were opened. The aim of the talks was to denuclearize the peninsula, and to assure the safety and sovereignty of both the south and the north.

10) Japan made a mockery of the talks, and they did not converge. Meanwhile the north continued to advance its nuclear armament.

11) After Bush's term ended, Barack Obama came to power in America. His philosophy, as far as foreign affairs are concerned, is that regimes that do not comply with American standards should be removed. In this sense he is very similar to Bush, but he as been advancing this policy using much more sophisticated methods.

12) Obama made it clear that he is going to press the north until the regime collapses. One manifestation was the provocative military maneuvers near the border, as well as terrorizing the north with the most advanced and mighty weapons. Another manifestation is the crippling sanctions, and the prohibition on developing satellite technology.

13) As a result of Obama's policy, the north now reacts again as someone who is pushed to the corner, and does not have much to loose.

-20 ( +0 / -20 )

How does NK actually think they are going to get out of this? Either they press the launch button (stupid) or back out either way they are screwed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Let us recall the main facts. I do not pretend to be an expert in Korean history, but here is the picture as I understand it: Hahahaha! you understood it wrong...failed!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@YGHome3

Just one point to add to your thirteen above.

1) There are concentration camps in North Korea with gas chambers. They execute babies.

Kind of makes US policy (and I'm no cheerleader) look pretty reasonable, no?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It was primarily the result of the political division of Korea by an agreement of the victorious Allies at the conclusion of the Pacific War at the end of World War II. The Korean Peninsula was ruled by the Empire of Japan from 1910 until the end of World War II. Following the surrender of the Empire of Japan in September 1945, American administrators divided the peninsula along the 38th parallel, with U.S. military forces occupying the southern half and Soviet military forces occupying the northern half.[26]

The failure to hold free elections throughout the Korean Peninsula in 1948 deepened the division between the two sides; the North established a communist government, while the South established a right-wing government. The 38th parallel increasingly became a political border between the two Korean states. Although reunification negotiations continued in the months preceding the war, tension intensified. Cross-border skirmishes and raids at the 38th Parallel persisted. The situation escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces invaded South Korea on 25 June 1950.[27] In 1950, the Soviet Union boycotted the United Nations Security Council, in protest at representation of China by the Kuomintang/Republic of China government, which had taken refuge in Taiwan following defeat in the Chinese Civil War. In the absence of a dissenting voice from the Soviet Union, who could have vetoed it, the United States and other countries passed a Security Council resolution authorizing military intervention in Korea.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

When Osama bin Laden declared war on the United States the US government didn't take him at his word, and look at what happened. Embassy bombings in Africa, the near-sinking of a US destroyer in Yemen, and then 9/11 and the collapse of the WTC. As unlikely as war seems on the Korean peninsula, the lessons of recent history suggest that King Kim III's threats have to be taken seriously.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If this was a crazy guy, holding a gun on someone, threatening to shoot, a SWAT team would have aerated his head by now.

Go in there and destroy the regime. They're killing their own people!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

12) Obama made it clear that he is going to press the north until the regime collapses. One manifestation was the provocative military maneuvers near the border, as well as terrorizing the north with the most advanced and mighty weapons. Another manifestation is the crippling sanctions, and the prohibition on developing satellite technology.

Those "provocative" military maneuvers have been going on since the 1960s. Also NK has been a little more provocative by doing things like hmm I don't know; attacking the Souths islands, attacking their ships, exploding nuclear weapons, firing ballistic missiles, telling their neighbors they are going to kill them, threatening to nuke the USA. Now who is being provocative? Some folk need to stop acted like the North is the victim. They are in a situation completely of their own making but like so many others on this planet they would rather blame others then take responsibility for their own actions.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Is this situation similar to Japan in the 1930s and the leadup to WW2 bombing Pearl Habor due to increased international sanctions? Japan only wanted to keep the US out of the Pacific by disabling their fleet, not actually bring them into the war, so that Japan could have unrestricted reign over the resources in SE Asia. From history we know what happens in the US when a few thousand people die due to the actions of enemy forces.

So is NK doing this in response to sanctions, and believe that they can actually defeat the world's most powerful military? It seems Jong Un just wants to ensure his regime's own survival, but everything he has done over the last month is threatening to destabilize it. There is no way he could make a dent to the US without getting bombed back to the stone age - maybe he wants to take down SK in a blaze of glory.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

As anyone thought that N/Korea is also doing a new style of practice drill to see how the South and the USA react LOL!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

YGHome3Apr. 04, 2013 - 09:29AM JST I am sorry for the lengthy post. This is due to the dramatic events. Let us recall the main facts. I do not pretend to be an expert in Korean history, but here is the picture as I understand it:

Not only do I agree with you absolutely but you haven't the slightest clue.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If this was a crazy guy, holding a gun on someone, threatening to shoot, a SWAT team would have aerated his head by now.

Go in there and destroy the regime. They're killing their own people!

I agree! Enough is enough, already.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Bye bye Nk

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Is Missle defense can shoot down all of the flying missles? One or two may be missed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If NK LOOSES missles, then NK will lose.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

told yall didn't I! ww3 mojos! get ready to rumble!!!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

When Osama bin Laden declared war on the United States the US government didn't take him at his word, and look at what happened. Embassy bombings in Africa, the near-sinking of a US destroyer in Yemen, and then 9/11 and the collapse of the WTC. As unlikely as war seems on the Korean peninsula, the lessons of recent history suggest that King Kim III's threats have to be taken seriously.

sorry but that was bush, he attacked his own country to blame it on another country and play war games. Osama was dead already. Benazir Bhutto was assassinated because she told the truth.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

LH10, WW III? WW means World War. How many nations do you think will come to So. Korea's aide if they are attacked? Two, maybe three.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I wonder how far those atomic slingshots will carry...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This gets more staggering by the day. Are they really serious?! The US have up to around 7500 nuclear weapons with the most sophisticated delivery systems, as well as the most sophisticated defense systems, in the world. And then there is the rest of their military hardware. North Korea are listed as having less than 10.

What it really shows is mass delusion and a dangerous detachement from reality in the extreme. After spending all that money in the pursuit of nuclear capability - while their population starved (just like China did), they put together a small arsenal, and fuelled by their own fantastical stories of this imaginary war and foe, they look set to step dumbly into a war where they will get the most shocking of reality checks.

But here's where I stand now. The regime that run North Korea need to go. They aren't fit to be looking after the best interests of the North Korean (or South Korean for that matter) people, and are certainly not sane enough to be in control of a nuclear arsenal - particularly in that geo-political region. This might be the best opportunity to get rid of them and reform that country. It's a shame they don't have a bit more oil under the ground there - because the US would have done it a long time ago if they had. But I think the time is nigh.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Kim...is kaput...BOOM..."game over"....North Korea's dear leader is digging himself a loving grave.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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