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New York proposes ban on sale of oversized sodas

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strange in a country of oversized people.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

“We’ve got to do something.”

While this may come from good intentions, it is inappropriate for a government to involve itself in matters of personal choice, unless that choice infringes on the rights of others. It has also been ineffective just about every time it has tried this.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I support Bloomberg's efforts to stop smoking in public places because that harms other people. But while I've many times been forced to share some nicotine addict's foul exhalations, I've never yet seen a fat guy trying to force bystanders to share his giant vat of coke. If they're only harming themselves, mind your own business.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

why dont you ban stupid people with no willpower instead of the products?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

A good idea imo, I went to LA last fall & there are LOTS of seriously supersized people there.

I think we are shortly going to find out soda makers & food makers in general are going to be outed because the stuff they put in is addictive to a degree.

I mean come on we know coke 24/7 is trying its utter best to keep us all suckling on their beverages AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE.

Something needs to give are peopl in a lot of place are going to start exploding so to speak.

I only rarely drink pop anymore, the stuff is a slow poison, clearly.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Dumb.

If you want to punish fat people for eating to much, raise their health insurance premiums.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Instead of banning 32 ounce servings, try banning anything containing HFCS (high fructose corn syrup).

That's the real killer in most processed/fast foods.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I agree with free will, etc., but if you look at this law closely, it`s not stopping people from drinking whatever they want or how much they want, just the size of a single serving. People are free to drink two, three or an endless number of drinks. This is a bit like taxing a drink.

I can see law suits in the future where obese individuals begin suing soft drink companies, etc.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Farmboy makes the right point; "it is inappropriate for a government to involve itself in matters of personal choice unless that choice infringes on the rights of others." It should be no wonder that the term "nanny state" is being used. Of course, it would seem that choosing such huge drinks goes against so-called common sense, but it's really about individual responsibility. No, Mr Bloomberg, it is NOT any government's responsibility to "do something", except to mind its own business. Certainly, some people will make claims about increased social healthcare costs(which increase for many other reasons including over-medication), and that would be true. In fact, that is a very good argument for individual responsibility regarding healthcare. As people rely on socialist healthcare, they are deincentivised from taking better care of themselves. Key words: individual responsibility

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It is more a matter of choices people make, as opposed to a matter of the size of the products out there.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Another Hashimoto in USA.

Government cannot tell its people what to do. Leave people alone. Let them do what they want to do. He has NO business at all. Is he a communist? He has gone too far for me.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I agree with those that say that government should not encroach peoples freedoms, as long as the freedom of some does not encroach on the freedom of others.

But the super-sized drinks use a lot of ice, which is why the polar caps and glaciers is slowly disappearing which forces the polar bears south where they eat small children. Won't somebody please think of the Children?. We must also consider that super-sized drinks lead to super-sized people, and they might suck the tiny people right into their folds by sheer gravitational pull.

So all in all, I think the government is right on this one.

;-D Allrighty then.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I always thought a bucket of soda was a bit much but as stated by others the 'gubment' needs to stay out of personal choices that don't directly affect others. Standby.....the breathing tax is next.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Agreed that the government should step in when a food product is found to be extremely bad for you (partially hydrogenated, high fructose, etc) but going after large sodas is not going to address the obesity issue because a single class of products or portion sizes is not what is driving a obesity rates.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why do we let it happen? The root of obesity is not the fault of companies. Why not tax obese people for being unhealthy? Wouldn't that be easier. Make them take a physical every year, and if they are deemed obese by the insurance company or government they have to pay more. The same could be said for the individuals that choose to smoke or drink. It's not the companies fault you do it. It's individual, so the tax ought to be the same.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ban super sized drinks, but you can carry a gun! which is more dangerous? (sigh)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

By outlawing 20oz, 1, and 2 liter bottles, Mayor Doofus has just increased the city's refuse problem. Now people are going to be depositing three times the plastic bottles in the trash containers that they used to. It's mighty convenient that he left the aluminum can industry alone. Someone check his campaign receipts to see how much ALCOA gave him.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Great idea.

Americans have proven time and time again that they in general are not good at making sensible decisions regarding their health.

That's not just me speaking - take one look at the obesity stats.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Yeah about those obesity stats... According to the all-mighty BMI weight charts, I'm "obese" - something even my doctor says is ridiculously incorrect. So I take any "obesity" stats with a a large amount of salt. If they're using BMI as the basis, their stats are all hosed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

“The percentage of the population that is obese is skyrocketing,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Thursday on MSNBC television. He added: “We’ve got to do something.”

Regulation of drink does not seem American solution to the problem.

I have never been to US so cannot understand what the culture would be like. But "too many calories" is same as "not enough exercise".

In Japan there is running boom. I suppose Japanese culture is conducive to such phenomenon. What would be an American approach that could result in Americans doing more exercise on masse?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

The oversized soft drink has an equivalent of 86 sugar cubes in cup. If we continue to drink it every day, we can gain 20 lbs/year just regular soft drink alone.. The orange juice will do the same trick. So I can understand his reasoning behind it, however, I still believe he is violating a principal of US constitution. The government has no right to tell people how to live. Freedom. The other side of coin of freecom is a personal responsibility everyone is willing (not forced) to take. So freedom and personal responsibility go together.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In any case, this proposed law wouldn't affect me. I haven't intentionally drank a drink with sugar or high fructose corn syrup in over three decades. Diet soda FTW!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I see a lot are saying the govt shud butt out, I understand but, clearly its bad to let companies produce mountains of GARBAGE & label it as food & sell it!

I am telling you big biz is HOOKING people onto this crap they call food & junk food has been junk even before they added EVEN more JUNK!

Bottom line is a lot of so called food let alone junk food is becoming less & less good for us while being pumped full of chemicals & slime & all kinds of CRAP, but HEY thats ok THATS THE AMERICAN WAY.

Well the american way is slowly poisoning its own, I realize we have our personal responsibilities but at the same time the world is letting big biz feed a load of CRAP!

We shudnt just let them!

1 ( +3 / -3 )

Do not blame companies who make tasty treats, or garbage as you call it. The problem is not tasty treats, it is the people who consume too much of the tasty treats.

Personally, I think it is only a problem if the health costs of the obese people must be covered by others. It is like tobacco. At least tobacco is taxed so the cost is covered more by tobacco consumers than non-tobacco consumers. However tasty treats are slightly different, it is OK to enjoy in moderate fashion, so to tax it does not make sense.

In the article, one man says obese people affect him too by higher premium for health. This could the area. I guess law may say there can be no "discrimination" by insurance companies? But, people who live in unhealthy way should be able to accept personal responsibility by paying higher premium. Maybe this is the best way. Let market decide how to price health insurance for individuals. When people can save money by living healthy, I think they will probably choose to do so.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Green tea, anyone?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

ihope2eatwhales

In the article, one man says obese people affect him too by higher premium for health. This could the area. I guess law may say there can be no "discrimination" by insurance companies? But, people who live in unhealthy way should be able to accept personal responsibility by paying higher premium. Maybe this is the best way. Let market decide how to price health insurance for individuals. When people can save money by living healthy, I think they will probably choose to do so.

And that opens a door for a load of problems. Higher insurance premiums for overweight people, then higher premiums for smokers, drinkers, people who ride motorcycles, take part in dangerous sports, live in certain areas etc etc etc. Are you sure thats a road you really want to go down?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Didnt the US do something similar regarding alcohol, and look what happened there! :)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

This makes sense. Studies have shown that when people are given discrete portions, they tend to eat/drink less (compared to being fed a continuous portion). For example, if you give them 100gr of chocolate in 20gr portions versus a single 100gr portion, they will tend to eat less when the same amount is divided into discrete units.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Mayor Bloomberg is a business $millionaire. He wants to put into place a law that he claims is for better health by limiting the size of a product. In America smaller products almost always cost more per unit of measurement than larger products. Sounds like a move to increase profits by forcing people to purchase two smaller servings which have a higher profit margin. And this increases sales of the supplier of the packaging, more profit for them. And a lot of waste companies charge by the weight of the waste, more profit to them.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Isn't Bloomberg's term of office about done?

It should be.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I think it would better to look at reducing the size of food portions served. Make then stay within a limit suitable for humans based on caloric content...

Also ban 'all you can eat' marketing campaigns....

-4 ( +2 / -5 )

You know, what this will really have an impact on, increased sales taxes. It will make you buy two 16 oz drinks vice one to get the same amount. When you do that, that is an additional sales tax that will be generated. Now in most fast food places you pretty much have self-serve drinks once you buy the cup, but I imagine that in NYC, they will go back to the old style of not having free refills and if you want more drinks, you have to pay for it.

Also, if you have to buy more than one drink, wouldn't that mean that there are more plastic cups in circulation causing more plastics to be disposed? Yet some cities want to ban plastic bags too.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Is this really about "personal" choice? I don't think so. Nothing will stop you from buying two regular sized sodas if you want to.

This is about stopping the "business" choice of ruthlessly promoting over consumption of soda. And you have to admit, the fast food joints are doing that like crazy and in a very irresponsible way.

I suppose the the gov could go with the precedent they did with cigarettes and just ban certain advertising? Would that be better?

I suppose they could even set price controls to ensure that the difference between the medium meal and the large meal is enough that you don't feel like a complete fool for getting the medium meal, only 75 cents cheaper for a lot less soda. And then after buying that, feeling obliged to drink all that soda even though you already feel full. Would that be better?

Like it or not, America really is in a state of emergency over obesity. I completely understand the criticisms of the option presented, but seriously, the fast food joints are abusing the people's own carelessness and its gone on long enough that we know the people won't save themselves. Some of the complaints here are very much like arguing the right of the state to put drug addicts in detox, citing their right of choice, when the fact of the matter is that the proposal is limit the freedom of the DRUG DEALERS. Fast food joints are America's fat dealers, and I support laws to limit their ability to literally sicken America, though I think we can do better than this proposal. Hey, its a start.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

but I imagine that in NYC, they will go back to the old style of not having free refills and if you want more drinks, you have to pay for it.

"I imagine" were DEFINITELY the right words to use there. Its funny that your conspiracy theory is contigent on a change in behavior that is not even up for discussion at this time, and you had to imagine. All part of the long term multi-step plan then?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

A nanny state... oh please. And they wonder why Americans are so fat! Ha ha! Sigh...

-5 ( +1 / -5 )

I think some folks here just dont realize how bad this is, I mean this supersize crap has been going on so long that todays adults have been supersizing SINCE THEY WERE KIDS!!!

Lets face kids, young people arent the sharpest when it comes to health, in todays world by the time they become young adults, corporate america has many HOOKED on their junk!

This is in no JUST about personal responsibility of adults, big biz is hooking the worlds children, then right thru adulthood. And the results are in plain view everywhere, especially in the US!

Sorry to rag on but again on my trip to LA last year, order a main dish & OMG, monstrous most of the time, its beyond insane!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Some of the comments, and part of the article, refer to health insurance costs/premiums and rightly so. One's general health is typically deemed a result if lifestyle, such as diet and exercise. Many cases of diabetes, for example, can be controlled by a reasonable regimen of diet and exercise. Individuals who exercise regularly and monitor their diet of their own volition typically reap the reward of better health. When health insurance is fully free-market(like auto insurance), the premium(cost to the individual ) is calculated on a risk-assessed basis. As such, lower risk individuals get lower premiums due to their wiser choices. Car insurance is similar;drivers who present a lower risk due to several factors, pay lower premiums.

With socialised healthcare, the incentive to take better care of one's health is removed and so people have less practical reason to take better care of their own health. Further, those who DO voluntarily take better care to reduce their health risks are effectively penalised by having to pay the same premiums as those who are irresponsible with their own health. Where's the fairness in that?

Banning product X, whether jumbo-sized sugary drinks, MSG, trans-fats, pork liver, fois gras, or whatever else , is worse than futile. Only the individual can/should be responsible for themselves, contrary to popular socialist elite propoganda.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Two completely unrelated thoughts:

The one place in the US where this really isn't necessary is New York City. Nobody drives a car in the city, and it's the lack of exercise that comes from relying on a car for even short distances that contributes most to obesity. When you're walking many blocks a day and climbing stairs in the subway stations, you keep fit even if you eat a lot of junk food. Just look at all those thin people -- who don't necessarily eat well -- in Japan's cities!

They're still using ounces, in the year 2012? Despite America's lack of progress in using metric, even soda bottles in supermarkets are sold in liters. At least make the limit half a liter.
2 ( +4 / -2 )

I completely understand the criticisms of the option presented, but seriously, the fast food joints are abusing the people's own carelessness and its gone on long enough that we know the people won't save themselves.

It's a good thing that we have bureaucrats and enlightened Politicians who just have had enough of that people can decide for themselves stuff and have once again stepped up to plate to decide what's really good for them.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

And next the chocolate ration will be increased to 30grams per week(up from 50grams per week).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This nonsense could be halted immediately if our corrupt Congress would pass a law requiring all food and drink sold, to be proven to contribute to good health. If you wanted junk food, you would have to make it yourself.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Americans have proven time and time again that they in general are not good at making sensible decisions regarding their health.

Nice try, I love how you just want to generalize as if EVERY American is obese, stupid don't care about their health. Do you know every single American? I don't think so! Americans weren't always fat, if you go back before the 70's America did not have a weight problem, most people ate at home, food portions were smaller so it's not like Americans were always like this. It partially started during the 70's people's income were getting better, people could afford more and many food companies decided to give people larger portions to get their $$$ worth. But as the years went on, the portions gradually increased. It's not necessarily always what you eat, but how you eat. Which sadly many young kids don't know. I don't think the government should intervene, but the schools and parents should learn and teach kids the proper education about food and to distinguish what is healthy and what is unhealthy. Even as an American, I never could understand the allure of soda pop! Sometimes, I like Sprite or Canada Dry, but nothing beats water, hands down it's the best drink to quench any thirst and you don't need to worry about the calories.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"...that have led to shouts that America’s largest city is becoming a “nanny state.”"

These same people (usually Republicans) will be the quickest to jump up and scream at politicians (probably Democrats) for 'not doing anything to combat the problem' and causing a MAJOR rise in diabetes, other illnesses, and the subsequent burden on the medical system. And yes, they ARE harming others by increasing said medical costs, and let's not forget the ridiculous lawsuits for when people become so obese that they are dying.

The mayor has a LONG road ahead of him if he's serious about doing what he states here, but it's a good start, if nothing else than for awareness. Call it a shame, if you like, that in the future an overweight kid might have to limit him or herself to a 500 ml soft drink with less sugar in it than the 2L with a cup of sugar soft drink they could gulp down (three or four a day of, for that matter) in a few minutes; I'd call it progress.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Who is to stop junk food lovers to buy several small drinks instead of one big one? This is more of the nanny state gone berserk,

Government should do the things that government is needed for, and not try to play babysitter for adult citizens.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

USA - the reason why I live in japan! And they call this a free nation! NOT!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Smith

As I recall it was the Dems that were on rampage on interfering with businesses and Michelle Obama was also trying to push people into eating a certain way. Its always liberals that think they know what is best for you and your health. It was Bloomberg and the Dems (again) telling people once again how to eat and drink just like how they were forcing restaurants to use transfat oils or else... I'm all for being healthy, but sticking my finger in someone else's face and scolding them is not right. Advise them, sure, interfere, No.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Meanwhile, Bloomberg supported National Doughnut Day that took place here in the States today. Heh, talk about sending a mixed message.

RR

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I foresee a new TV show out of this: Law and Order: Pop Cops

RR

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Cletus,

Higher insurance premiums for overweight people, then higher premiums for smokers, drinkers, people who ride motorcycles, take part in dangerous sports, live in certain areas etc etc etc. Are you sure thats a road you really want to go down?

Sure. Do you hope for other people to pay for your decisions? I am happy to pay for mine.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Frank, you are right. Bloomberg said that people can just buy two cups of soft drink at the cinema, if they wish to drink such an amount. It causes extra waste by enforcing this rule. And people have only one cup holder at cinema as well.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It was Bloomberg and the Dems (again) telling people once again how to eat and drink

Bloomberg is usually classed as a Republican or an independent - since 2001 anyway. There are nannies in all political parties, and if you weren't spending so much time with those 32 ounce sodas, you'd notice.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Meanwhile, Bloomberg supported National Doughnut Day that took place here in the States today. Heh, talk about sending a mixed message.

Wow! You're right, and that is absolutely hilarious!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I can see law suits in the future where obese individuals begin suing soft drink companies, etc.

Yes, that's what we need. More lawsuits solving the problems of the nation. Brilliant.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"it is unlikely the ban will be enacted"

Duh!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm all for nutritional info labels, and I like the idea of the the listing of protein, carbs, fat , calories, etc on restaurant dishes.

And in the case of Japan, cesium...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I like oversized drinks and fries... I usually order one iced tea and one fries for my family of four. Much cheaper than ordering 4 smalls.. which my kids can't finish.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Herve Nmn L'Eisa, the definition of "health insurance" is "socialization." Whether it is mandated or even provided by the government does not prevent providers from factoring in risk-assessment into premiums. A major problem is determining whether obeseness and diabetes are genetically or environmentally caused, and the expense and difficulty in distinguishing between the two means even private insurance companies tend to avoid the subject; instead, they'll simply decline coverage.

It is said that, in theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice, they are not. "Individual choice" is a wonderful thing, assuming a conscious choice - and that is a major assumption. Give most New Yorkers 40 ounces (now I've got Sublime on the mind!) of HFCS-infused carbonated water and they'll likely imbibe it all; cut that by two-thirds, and many will carry on happily without noticing the difference. Bloomberg is not prohibiting consumption; he's simply regulating container size.

The American government has spent some $40 billion over the last few decades on HFCS production subsidies. It is well past time to turn these subsidies into taxes.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The cold truth is that health care costs are rising and obesity is the main culprit. Taxpayers in the USA are footing the bill while obesity continues to increase and in general those that are obese are not paying the majority of their own doctor bills. I say we either regulate high calorie food more or we totally deny health care unless those that need it can pay for it totally.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

•They're still using ounces, in the year 2012? Despite America's lack of progress in using metric, even soda bottles in supermarkets are sold in liters. At least make the limit half a liter.

For anything less than a liter, we still use ounces and it appears that liters are only for non-alcoholic beverages (beer still is sold in ounces divisible by 12)

In the U.S., all the soda companies have agreed to not sell sugared soft drinks or juices in public school vending machines. This was a voluntary thing on their part to try and avoid laws like the one proposed here. At the high school here where I work, your choices in the vending machines are bottled water, "vitamin water", or diet drinks.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is this really about "personal" choice? I don't think so.

I disagree. You have not starved enough for freedom. Freedom is like air, and you cannot smell, touch, and move until someone takes it away from you. . United States of America is a nation of law. We stand up high for Freedom, Equality and Justice for ALL. Let's freedom ring, let's freedom ring!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Laguna, thanks for your input.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

How about lowering insurance rates and taxes for fit people? People under a certain body fat percentage pay less and let the fatties pay for their own medical costs and insurance?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Food Nazis strike again! Now you have to buy 2 drinks instead of 1.

The proposal marks the first time an American city has so directly attempted to limit sugary-drink portion sizes. City officials said Thursday they believe it will ultimately prove popular with New Yorkers and push governments around the U.S. to adopt similar rules.

Er, yeah, so idiotic.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Bloomberg would make quite a dictator. While there are obvious reasons for moderating habits and vices the government has no business make up arbitrary rules to try to enforce a certain "acceptable" behaviour. Bloomberg is over the top arrogant for even thinking he has the right to do this, let alone the reason.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This isn't about health issues it is about making money for the companies when people are forced to buy two drinks instead of one.

Bloomberg and the government are allowing companies to charge a whole lot more for less and are getting away with it in the name of healthy eating. The trend is for people to pay more for everything in small sizes. People who are investors in those companies stocks will get a better returned due to people buying more for less.

If Bloomberg and the government care about obesity then they should be promoting exercising. It doesn't cost a person money to go running or walking.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bloomberg looks like he could lose a pound or two himself. Talking about calling the kettle black!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Forced to buy two drinks instead of one'? Are you guys joking? Do you buy two here? My understanding is that water is free!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Sadly looking at most of the posts here it looks like the US will likely continue to get fatter overll!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@GW

Im not so sure about that, it totally depends on the individual, but I have seen more health food stores pop up, people being educated to go back to the old days when people grew their own foods, lived an organic lifestyle and it looks like through education and with the increasing health problems that are plauging society, it's no wonder you have a growing segment out there that want to live longer and care about their weight and want to change the way they live and eat. So I think there is a trend, slow, but I see America trying to go back to its early roots and if so, it's a good thing. Yes, I want the government to stay out of my life ( especially Bloomberg ) but with the proper education and allowing people to see their various options of living healthier or developing serious health problems, I think most people will choose the healthy option. So there is hope.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Bass, if that was the case, wouldn't the weight issue be dropping? Well educated and 'wealthy" people are the ones buying the organic, watching what they eat... There is a correlation between weight and class and well, the poor you are, the higher your chances are of being overweight. Until the US does something about the division between the haves and have nots, this will continue to be a problem. Single parents are usually less educated and more likely to buy crap and pre-cooked food. Easier and faster. And in many cases, cheaper when you look at the size and calories.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There is a correlation between weight and class and well, the poor you are, the higher your chances are of being overweight. Until the US does something about the division between the haves and have nots, this will continue to be a problem

@tmarie, Yes, these two you have mentioned; weight and class (education level) are closely related.

Many public US schools still serve soft drinks and junk foods. Many kids are buying oversized gulp drinks pumping 86 sugar cubes in their bodies before mom get home from work. They still sell dress size 37 and 40 for plus size women and men size XXXXXL. The gap between poor and rich is getting bigger and bigger here in US. 1/3 of Americans are overweight. This is what's really going on here.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

A new ordinance will be introduced next week. It prohibits the sale of an extra-large, double cheese and meat pizza IF it comes with a regular soda. However, it it comes with a DIET soda, it is permissible. Government cannot legislate against stupidity and it needs to concentrate on job creation. Yes, more employees to make extra large pizza and serve diet sodas.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bass I hope yr right, but honestly if I needed to make a wager today I wud throw my bet on things getting worse sadly

0 ( +0 / -0 )

In stead of banning it how about a super size soda tax, and super size soda warnings, with grizely pictures like the ones on UK cigarette packets?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

this basically hurts the poorest in new york. a frappucino packs way more calories.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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