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New Zealand's gun laws, tightened after 2019 mosque attack, being revised by ex-gun lobbyist

8 Comments
By CHARLOTTE GRAHAM-McLAY

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because they put excessive burdens on gun owners who feel vilified by law enforcement and the public

Much the same in Japan. The hoops I had to jump through to get my guns in Japan are, frankly, ridiculous. It is very obvious that the bureaucrats making the laws pertaining to firearms and hunting in Japan have never even touched a gun or been hunting in their lives. And the law is going to get even stricter this October.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

It's not surprising given the fact NZ has changed from a more liberal to a conservative govt.

Note that the white supremacist mass murderer was an Australian living in NZ temporarily and not a local.

Most New Zealanders do not know his name, which is usually not mentioned publicly.

Please respect NZ's wishes to keep this name unknown; we don't want him to become famous.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Most New Zealanders do not know his name, which is usually not mentioned publicly.

Please respect NZ's wishes to keep this name unknown; we don't want him to become famous.

I understand this was Ardern's wish, but I've never really understood how it could work.

A less than 5 second Google search turns up the evil scumbag's name to any Kiwi. Plus, pretty much all Kiwis read international news, like this AP report.

 “I have to have an eye test every time I renew my drivers’ license. Gun owners should have similar background and mental health checks every few years to make sure they’re still safe to have guns.”

A very sensible and logical statement from a victim of this heinous crime.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Fighto!Today  06:04 pm JST

Most New Zealanders do not know his name, which is usually not mentioned publicly.

Please respect NZ's wishes to keep this name unknown; we don't want him to become famous.

I understand this was Ardern's wish, but I've never really understood how it could work.

A less than 5 second Google search turns up the evil scumbag's name to any Kiwi. Plus, pretty much all Kiwis read international news, like this AP report.

Not publicizing the name of a mass murderer is crucial to avoid glorifying the perpetrator and to prevent inspiring copycat crimes. When media and officials refrain from naming the individual, it reduces the notoriety they may seek and keeps the focus on the victims and their stories, showing respect to those affected by the tragedy. This approach diminishes the psychological impact and the 'message' the murderer intended to send.

Despite the good intentions, the digital age poses challenges as information is widely accessible online. Even if mainstream media withholds the name, it can still be found through social media and less responsible outlets. Balancing ethical journalism with the public's right to know is a delicate task that requires careful consideration.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Bad facts make bad law. Massacres with semi-automatic rifles hadn't really been that much of a problem before 2019. The two previous ones were in 1994 - the Bains - and Aramoana, in 1990. Almost every other mass shooting has involved shotguns and manual repeating rifles, which weren't subject to the ban. All the law changes did after 2019 was remove tools of the trade from farmers and growers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_massacres_in_New_Zealand

The actual source of the vast majority of gun crime in New Zealand, gangs, carried on as normal, even being reported as saying, "Will gangs get rid of their weapons? No. Because of who we are, we can't guarantee our own safety," 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/mongrel-mob-leader-says-members-wont-hand-in-their-guns/DY3UKD2J3XFQJAYXOJXMWAE27M/

I'd also make the argument that it wasn't loose gun legislation that allowed him to get his weapons. It was loose enforcement by the relevant authorities. He provided two references for his application. His online gaming friend, and that friend's parent. The friend was known to police for "attempted importation of an offensive weapon and firearm parts without the necessary permits to import," and the parent also had a record, albeit a relatively minor, and historic one.

https://christchurchattack.royalcommission.nz/the-report/part-5-the-terrorist/the-process-by-which-the-individual-obtained-a-firearms-licence/

And that's along with the fact that a local hospital hadn't reported their treatment of him after he'd suffered a GUNSHOT wound.

Also, the bans and restrictions did little to reduce gun crime, in fact it has increased since 2019, as this article reports.

All that said, however, New Zealanders must register their births, marriages, dogs, vehicles, businesses, property transactions, deaths etc. What's the problem with registering your firearm? Unless you are planning on using it for nefarious purposes of course. I mean...paperwork? Cry me a river.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Sorry, not a "GUNSHOT wound." It was an accident while he was cleaning a gun in his living room. Further, there was no requirement to report it, and it may have fallen under privacy codes.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

And surely the laws will be stricter, like a good civilized country that NZ is...

Not like US

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Much the same in Japan. The hoops I had to jump through to get my guns in Japan are, frankly, ridiculous. It is very obvious that the bureaucrats making the laws pertaining to firearms and hunting in Japan have never even touched a gun or been hunting in their lives. And the law is going to get even stricter this October.

And I sincerely hope that the gun laws in Japan will be more and more stricter, so that people like you have to hand back your guns and not own any for the rest of your life..

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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