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New Zealand bans foreign students from prostitution

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Wow! NZ is really enlightened on sex trade.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If they have a work visa, why should the sex trade be off the table? Granted, it's not very easy to tax, which I'm guessing is the main reason, but work is work.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Seems silly to wexclude them from this. Is it a desirable profession that needs to be protected for the locals?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm guessing here - but the ban could be an attempt to protect them from Asian syndicates employing the girls under virtual slave conditions. However it will be near impossible to enforce the law if they can still work in "massage" joints.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Another method of price control by the government.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Damn, that's my future career plans wrecked.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Overseas students are banned from such work here in Japan too but it seems to be water off a duck's back. Perhaps the government needs to have a law on the books enabling them to crack down when they need a charge for some reason.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How about Japanese on a working-holiday? More cash than being a waitress at a sushi place ;)

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

i guess the chinese were snatching up too many of the regulars huh..

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Overseas students don't have family or a social network to fall back on. Most students who take up prostitution actually do so to pay their tuition fees , and have borrowed heavily from "sources "in China. So most haven't willingly gone into this profession. This problem exists in Australia and England as well. The New Zealand govt is actually passing this legislation to ensue the well being of the students.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Apparently the sex trade is legal and regulated in NZ. It makes me curious- does that mean that prostitution jobs are posted and advertised at government work/unemployment offices just like 'regular' jobs? Are people who receive government jobless benefits required to apply to work in such places in order to qualify for their govt cash?

I can just imagine the scene. Govt factotum tells unemployed woman that she has two choices- work in the brothel or lose her benefit. Something tells me that those in favor of legalizing the sex business never thought of this scenario.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'm surprised to learn that China surpasses South Korea in this area.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yeah, it is almost certainly there to protect human trafficking victims and students who might be pressured into it out of poverty or desperation. Hardly a panacea, but it should hopefully dissuade some from doing it, and it gives more ammunition for the government to fight traffickers and pimps who force the students into it.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Apparently the sex trade is legal and regulated in NZ. It makes me curious- does that mean that prostitution jobs are posted and advertised at government work/unemployment offices just like 'regular' jobs? Are people who receive government jobless benefits required to apply to work in such places in order to qualify for their govt cash?

Short answer: No.

Longer answer: No they're not, in the same way that they're also not required to join the army, join the police, work on a trawlership, work in a mine, or do any other jobs which bear substantial physical and/or psychological risks.

Something tells me that those in favor of legalizing the sex business never thought of this scenario.

If you thought of it, so did the legislators and those who campaigned for it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Fugacis; But if it is just a job like any other, with tax paid and so on, why not? It is hardly comparable to the jobs you mentioned. More or less, just an office job really. The whole point of legalizing it was to supposedly eliminate the risks you mentioned. It's just sex, anyway. A simple physical need, like eating or drinking.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

These students are really working their butts off to improve their lot in life. Soon enough the worm will turn and it will be the improvident locals, compelled by economic circumstance, to turn tricks in order to put bread on the table.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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