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Unsettled nation marks 9/11 with rituals of sorrow

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Why is this president diliked by so many Americans. His words are spoken with sincerity,his humbleness should not be taken as a weekness. He inherited so many problems and yet he faces ongoing problems from the opposition,and some Americans,give him a chance.Bush had 8 years to make the problems that all Americans are facing today. I only hope that his presidency does not change him or his thinking as a person.

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Another scolding lecture to the most tolerant, diverse nation on earth, from a president who thinks the country is a university campus of some sort he reluctantly has to preside over, when he could be doing so much more elsewhere - - as Secretary General of the UN, or the new Caliph, or leader of a reconstituted Comintern, or all three of those roles...

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I wish the President would ask Muslims to be tolerent as well - could he ask them just once - just once? He keeps sucking up to Islam and they just keep shouting "death to America" at him.

“As Americans we are not — and never will be — at war with Islam,” the president said.

True - America is at war with Islamists.

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Why is this president diliked by so many Americans.

Because so many Americans are driven by sheer ignorance and superstition.

I only hope that his presidency does not change him or his thinking as a person.

No way. Mr. Obama is man of rock-solid integrity.

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"Why is this president disliked by so many Americans(?)"

"Because so many Americans are driven by sheer arrogance and superstition"

No, because so many Americans are fed up with their country being bankrupted and having legislation passed that the majority doesn't approve of.

"Mr. Obama is a man of rock-solid integrity"

Har! Good one, yabits!

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Such a shame to see Sarge hating and disrespecting the President of the United States when mention of his high integrity is made.

The Democratic Party won the elections of 2006 and 2008 handily because a majority didn't like how the Republicans were running things. That the Democrats are passing legislation that the Republicans don't like is quite normal when you're on the losing end.

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As Americans we are not — and never will be — at war with Islam,” the president said. “It was not a religion that attacked us that September day — it was al-Qaida, a sorry band of men which perverts religion.”

Having my doubts to this theory, nevertheless, Taliban had nothing to do with 9/11 so US should not be in Afghanistan.

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Obama is clown and he is tearing the country a part, I expect a inner war in U.S maybe in 6 months or less

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@"Taliban had nothing to do with 9/11 so US should not be in Afghanistan."

Should the Taliban be there? Should the Taliban be allowed to terrorize that nation?

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Should the Taliban be there? Should the Taliban be allowed to terrorize that nation?

It was with US help in the first place that they got so much power. US funded Taliban.

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Thanks for voting Obama for President.

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@"It was with US help in the first place that they got so much power."

1 - Do you know what 'countervalence' means, as it relates to international politics and foreign policy? Why did the US fund some of the mujahadeen, waaaaay back in 1979?

2 - Can you answer the question:Should the Taliban be allowed to terrorize the once-sovereign nation of Afghanistan?

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neogreenjapan: "...Taliban had nothing to do with 9/11..."

Just to refresh your memory, the Taliban controlled much of Afghanistan and allowed al-Qaida to set up terrorist training camps(which led to attacks not only on the US but England,Spain,Bali etc.)

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Should the Taliban be there? Should the Taliban be allowed to terrorize that nation?

"In mid-May, 2001, Secretary of State Colin Powell announced a $43 million grant to Afghanistan...there was little doubt that the new stipend was a reward for Kabul's anti-drug efforts." http://www.cato.org/pub_display.php?pub_id=3556

The Taliban had American funding and support prior to 9/11. Nobody cared then if they were terrorizing the nation. I don't see any logical connection as to why the Al-Quada attacks should make people start caring and start claiming deep concern for the people of Afghanistan now.

Just trying to justify a failed policy and a lost war.

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The U.S. went after Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban because they were supporting and protecting Al-Qaeda.

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The thing about Muslim-lead governments is that if you give them 2.54 centimeters, they try to take 1.61 kilometers.

Disarm Iran now!!!

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As I have said about 9/11 before and made me think about the whole thing was on Y/tube loose change, maybe Islam and nothing to do with it in the first place!

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I went to the local Japanese fire department station house as I have done every Sept 11th and thanked them for the job that they do, just my way of observing this day in Japan and hope that they may never have to respond as the New York Fire Department had to that day we were attacked by Islamic terrorists....... But I know that if they also had to respond to a terrorist attack they would do so with the same heroism and bravery and there American counter-parts did that day. They understood exactly why I was there and appreciated the gesture, as they have done every year since I have been doing this.

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"A new World Trade Center is finally ready to rise"

It'll never be completed before the Ground Zero mosque.

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It's time to mend fences. Michael Moore is taking up a collection for the mosque, and now that I think about it, it seems like a good idea. I shall write him a cheque. Here's more about Moore: http://www.michaelmoore.com/words/mike-friends-blog/if-mosque-isnt-built-no-longer-america

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Beelzebub,

I'd start trying to mend fences with Rasoleen Tallon first before writing any sort of check to Michael Moore.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RS5eMK7dOEE

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Some Americans need to start getting over 9-11.

It's been almost a decade now and holding onto the anger isn't helping anyone in particular, in fact, it is harming the people who keep feeling it.

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SushiSake3.

I agree, said that there are many americans that still hold onto the hatred from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, etc wars.

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I just saw a sign board being held up by an American mosque opponent in a news article.

It read: No Victory Mosque at Ground Zero.

I thought - It's not a victory mosque, and it's not at Ground Zero.

Just how deluded can some people get???

Really, it's no surprise at all there's anger when some people can't even get the basic facts right.

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If someone holds onto anger, hatred and bitterness for that length of time, the ony one they are hurting is themselves.

The terrorists behind 9-11 couldn't give a sh*t.

Time to get over it folks.

Move on. It's healthy and it won't poison your cells and your souls.

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Many people forget that people from many nations and creeds(and yes it includes those people too) died in the towers.

Also there was a "Prayer Room"(to be PC) on the 17th floor of the South Tower.

Makes me wonder where some people get their facts and data from.

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Wolfpack: America is at war with Islamists.

A lot of Christianites certainly are. If America only knew who it truly should be at war with, it would have a much better chance at achieving a good result.

When Obama addresses the nation and pleas for tolerance, I don't think he is excluding Muslims, is he? It seems to me that Muslims in America have been extremely tolerant. It's not like they ran riot on Glenn Beck when he suggested that Congressman Ellison somehow needed to prove that he wasn't working with "our enemies".

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I think these discussions and controversies over these issues are good. I prefer to see the American people engaged on this issue, peacefully as they are, rather than passively attending memorials.

I see the building of the Mosque in that location as provocative - I don't see how anyone can see it otherwise. Also, where is the money coming from to build it? How come everyone else is always encouraged to be tolerant and respect others viewpoints - it sure seems that adherents of Islam are never encouraged to do so - certainly not by their leaders.

I think the President is "on the side of the angels" in this debate. However, we need him to take a stronger stand against what to me is clearly wrong, and is apparently viewed as wrong by most Americans. We need him to show leadership, and not get bogged down in trivia, which these discussions are, from the standpoint of the Presidency. This reminds a little of the "Beer Summit" issue involving the arrest of Harvard Professor Henry Gates by a Cambridge, MA policeman - not really an issue requiring the President's full attention.

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Some Americans need to start getting over 9-11.

Tell that to the people who lost family members.

As I have said about 9/11 before and made me think about the whole thing was on Y/tube loose change, maybe Islam and nothing to do with it in the first place!

I can't belief there are actually people thinking that someone else than Osama bin L. was responsible for these attacks. Silly people. Anyway, that whole Loose Change thing has been debunked already.

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Note to some of the posters who seem to think Americans are intolerant and mean-spirited - if President Obama is not re-elected, I assure the (most likely Republican) next President will take a much stronger stand, having been led there by the American people. The Islamic World is not likely to have a President who is as interested in reaching out to them as President Obama, and I say that with all respect. I like President Obama, I voted for him in 2008 in both the Democratic primary and the general election. Right now I don't know if I would vote for him again. If a moderate to conservative Republican, like for example Congressmen Paul Ryan, is elected President, he will almost certainly not be as interested in furthering a dialogue with the Islamic World as President Obama. No disrespect to the President or Congressman Ryan - they would just be following the thoughts of the American people - as put forth by Palin et al, probably not with the best motivations.

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@"When Obama addresses the nation and pleas for tolerance, I don't think he is excluding Muslims, is he? It seems to me that Muslims in America have been extremely tolerant."

Americans don't need politicians lecturing them about tolerance.

And frankly, the tolerance Mohammedans in America show towards other faiths and lifestyles is the exception, not the rule.

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9/11 is/was a US government cover up.

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"9/11 is/was a US government cover up."

Progressivz is clever !

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SezWho2: A lot of Christianites certainly are. If America only knew who it truly should be at war with, it would have a much better chance at achieving a good result.

I agree that the American people do not have a clear understanding of exactly who they are at war with because of political correctness. It isn't Islam - it is Islamists that are the enemy of free countries. There is a difference. Mainstream Islam has been cowed by their extremist wing and does not stand up and denounce them. Instead, the 'moderates' denounce those in the West that are attempting to defend themselves more loudly than they do the Islamists who have highjacked their religion for political purposes.

When Obama addresses the nation and pleas for tolerance, I don't think he is excluding Muslims, is he?

Yes, he is asking Americans to be tolerant of Muslims - which I also agree with. He seems to be inordinately concerned with the feelings of Muslims and is not all that concerned with his fellow countrymen. A perfect example of this was his public call for the Florida pastor to not burn the Koran yet he refuses to ask the Iman behind the Ground Zero Mosque to not build it on such a sensitive site. They both have a right to do what they state that they want to do, but Obama only denounces the non-Muslim. Why? The Iman also made a veiled threat on CNN about the consequences of moving the mosque from the intended site. The Florida pastor did not make threats - he just wanted to express himself non-violently. In the end, the pastor did not burn a Koran.

The attack on the World Trade Center was motivated by extremists Islamic views and a majority of Americans feel that erecting a mosque there is a provacation; just as burning a Koran is considered a provacation. You can not sever the tie between Islamic terrorists from Islam - that is the ideology behind their actions.

The ceremonies marking the 9th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks is still an emotional issue for most Americans and Obama is not on the same wavelength with the American people about it.

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Mainstream Islam has been cowed by their extremist wing and does not stand up and denounce them.

You are WAAYYYY wrong about that.

Islamic extremism has totally lost favor throughout the Muslim world, and is denounced everywhere.

Like so many deluded people, you assume fair criticism of U.S. foreign policy -- which has largely overreacted to the threat -- equates to support for Islamic extremism.

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MisterCreosote: Americans don't need politicians lecturing them about tolerance.

It's quite plain that Americans have always needed guidance in terms of tolerance. I think the American system is better in that demands tolerance. However, what is demanded is not always given. Whether politicians are the right group of people to plea for tolerance is a different question, but I see no reason why they should not.

And frankly, the tolerance Mohammedans in America show towards other faiths and lifestyles is the exception, not the rule.

"Mohammedans"? Have you ever heard a Muslim refer to himself as that? Your semi-slur notwithstanding, it is irrelevant that Muslim tolerance is the exception not the rule. The contention was that Obama should exalt Muslims to tolerance. In the Golden Days of W, much was made of the fact that he was President of the US, not of the world. Ditto Obama. When he addresses Americans, he is addressing all Americans. Do you think he needed a special shout-out to all those erstwhile law-abiding American Muslims?

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Wolfpack, Obama is absolutely doing the right thing here. Threatening to burn the holy book of any religion would be a travesty. But so is claiming a plan to build a religious structure on the site of a derelict coat factory that is neither Ground Zero nor hallowed ground.

Not only that, but you are clearly misinterpreting the president's actions when you claim - falsely - that Obama is paying inordinate attention to the feelings of Muslims.

No. He is abiding by the First Amendment - something that an inordinate number of American anti-mosque protestors appear to be completely incapable of doing time and time again.

President Obama is putting absolute law above subjective taste, which is absolutely the right thing to do.

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Wolfpack: There is a difference. Mainstream Islam has been cowed by their extremist wing and does not stand up and denounce them.

I don't for a moment believe that mainstream Islam has been cowed by extremists, no more--and probably a lot less--than mainstream Protestantism has been cowed by reactionary interpretations of the bible in the US. And, yes, the moderates do denounce the West. And so do plenty of people in the West. But that is because the West has a nasty habit of "defending itself" on Islamic turf and in the best of times visiting draconian regimes upon largely Muslim populations and in the worst of times, visiting sanctions, warfare and death. It is quite disproportionate and it is the lack of proportion that draws the criticism.

A perfect example of this was his public call for the Florida pastor to not burn the Koran yet he refuses to ask the Iman behind the Ground Zero Mosque to not build it on such a sensitive site.

I think that would be an imperfect example. The Imam's contemplated action is to build an interfaith cultural center. The Florida furniture salesman's contemplated action is to burn a holy book. There is no question that the Q'uran is sacred to the Muslims. And there is no question that the planned location of the cultural center is not designated as sacred to the memory of 9/11.

Anger against the Imam is totally misplaced. If people believe that site should be sacred, then they should petition the city to make it so. Otherwise, it's just a case of trying to dictate who can and who cannot build there based on who we like at the time. Obama showed no favoritism by refusing to ask the Imam not to proceed with his plans. He showed analytical ability and good sense.

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Does anyone else find it intriguing that so many American anti-mosque protestors appear more than happy to blackwash an entire religion for a local act of violence, and yet the same American anti-mosque protestors won't - similarly - blackwash all Christians for another local act of violence - the Catholic vs. Protestant civil war that took place in Northern Ireland for over a decade?

The parallels are striking, and yet the reaction couldn't be more different. All of which leads me to conclude that an inordinate number of American anti-mosque protestors are either racist, or just generally unable to deal with people who are religiously and culturally different from them.

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Islamic extremism has totally lost favor throughout the Muslim world, and is denounced everywhere.

Too bad we don't hear it. Please provide your examples and links that prove this.

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mikehuntez: Too bad we don't hear it. Please provide your examples and links that prove this.

Actually, yabits is responding to the assertion that mainstream Islam does not denounce extremism. The burden of proof lies with those who make that assertion. Unfortunately for them, they have placed themselves in a position where they have to prove a negative.

So, unless you are willing to make that proof, I'm afraid you're going to have to accept a single instance of Islamic repudiation as evidence that the assertion was wrong. And, in any event, why would you be likely to hear repudiations of extremism? Do you regularly listen to the words of Muslim scholars and clerics?

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So, unless you are willing to make that proof...

The more that mikehuntez looks for proof, the sooner he'll discover that clerics all over the Islamic world are denouncing Al Qaeda and other groups whose violence kills innocent people.

Al Qaeda has completely lost the hearts and minds of Muslims.

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Watched a report earlier on TV.

In Afghanistan many military guys(formerly ousted) are being re-armed by the goverment to protect their villages from Taliban insurgents, etc.

Whole segment was in english so must have been an overseas report.

When they interviewed locals they all said they HATE the Taliban but have to pay them or get killed.

Don't sound like the radicals/extremists won the hearts of the people.

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Sushisake3 - I don't follow your argument - why should I be as concerned with what did or didn't happen in Northern Ireland as I am with what happened in the United States?

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lakechamp - 9/11: perpetrated by Muslim extremists - some people blame an Muslims. Northern Ireland conflict: perpetrated by Christian extremists - no one blames all Christians.

Why not?

Moderator: Northern Ireland is not relevant to this discussion.

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Actually, yabits is responding to the assertion that mainstream Islam does not denounce extremism. The burden of proof lies with those who make that assertion.

SezWho - by providing no links, Mike has supported his position that Muslim voices denouncing extremism are hard to find. Now, you must post links to support your side of the argument. :-)

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