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Police handcuff tantrum-throwing 6-year-old in Georgia

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...that overwhelmed teachers are unaware that calling in the police could also result in serious criminal charges.

If the teacher has a physical problem with a child, he or she may not legally use any degree of force to deal with it. One mistake about this will end a teacher's career. That being the case, what should the teacher do but call those whose job it is to do this? That the police used excessive force is not the fault of the teacher, and under the present system the police simply need more training.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

This is a sad, pathetic situation, calling the police for a 6 year old?? Georgia and the rest of the USA need a time out and reflect on how stupid this situation is, time to change them Georgia laws and if a 6 year old is out of control, spank his or her little ass, spare the rod and spoil the child!!

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

tearing items off the walls and throwing books and toys in an outburst Friday at her school in Georgia. Police said she also threw a small shelf that struck the principal in the leg, jumped on a paper shredder and tried to break a glass frame.

It's good thing she didn't get an ass-whipping!

. “She said they were really tight. She said they really hurt her wrists,” Ruff said. “She was so shaken up.”

Then the little brat should have thought be fore she did. If she did this in the same class my son was in, I would have had a few words with her parents. Maybe I'd just throw shelves at them.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

If my parents had named me Salecia I would probably be freaking out too.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I think the authorities acted appropriately. The family should be asking themselves why their child acts like this in school, rather than attempting to blame other people.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

“It’s the kids that just make you mad that you don’t need to make a crime.”

On the contrary, disrupting class and stealing the educational time of other students should be considered a crime.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Arrested for burping????

The American dream.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

If the teachers are not allowed to touch them, then they call the cops.

In this case she was handcuffed? Good.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Spare the rod and spoil the child. What happened to good old fashioned Spanking............

4 ( +5 / -1 )

As a male teacher I was warned repeatedly NEVER to touch a child as it would lead to either assault charges or sexual harrassment charges. I would be able to take the complaints of these civil rights groups more seriously if they quantified this "special training" that they mentioned. There is no way and no time to talk down a child who might injure herself of others.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

sam,

Exactly.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The examples the person in the article mentions -- arresting kids for burping, using a cell-phone, etc. -- are ridiculous, but in the case of this tantrum it's hard to say. If the girl was a threat to those around her, ie. if it was a violent tantrum (sounds like it was pretty wild), then I don't think the teacher did anything wrong in calling in the police. Perhaps instead of cuffing the girl the officer(s) may have tried more subtle tactics first (and who knows... maybe they did?), but as Farmboy mentioned that in North America and probably other nations you are not allowed to lay a hand on a student WHATSOEVER. What else could the teacher have done, really? I'm assuming, or at least hoping, they had exhausted all the other approaches to classroom management before the police were called in.

Anyway, it's a shame the girl was shaken up, and I don't think she should have been hauled off to the police station in cuffs -- I think the presence of the police officer and the threat of doing so should have been enough -- but calling in the police was the right thing to do. If any good comes of this it'll be that (a) there is a serious and soul-searching examination of the disciplinary system and when it's appropriate or not to call in the authorities, and (b) the girl will have learned from this and may not be quite so keen to throw another tantrum.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

What else could the teacher have done, really?

Call the parents?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Cleo, what would that of done if both parents are working. Six year old don't have temper tantrums. They misbehave. If a six year old doesn't know it is not okay to rip things off walls, throw things and behave violently to others, obviously the parents aren't doing their job and calling them wont solve anything. This kid sounds like and out of control brat with family that is clueless. calling them wouldn't have done anything but prolong the disturbance and perhaps lead to the girl hurting herself or others.

Sadly, teachers have very little support and recourse for misbehaving students now. Blame that on parents and lawyers. Burping is a silly reason to call the cops but u can imagine a teenage boy being repeatedly told to stop and ignores the staff and then gets in a teacher's face. Sadly, have seen such things personally. Teacher's should never get to the point where they have to call the cops for help but sadly, with manners nothing taught at home, children being wild and adults excusing bad behaviour as "children being children", what else can teachers to to ensure a safe environment for other kids?

Had this school done nothing and this kid attacked another child, people would be screaming for the teacher's head. Teachers just can't win these days.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

This is a sad, pathetic situation, calling the police for a 6 year old?? Georgia and the rest of the USA need a time out and reflect on how stupid this situation is, time to change them Georgia laws and if a 6 year old is out of control, spank his or her little ass, spare the rod and spoil the child!!

@ Elbuda Mexicano: I agree completely! Since they have taken away corporal punishment in the schools in America, you have seen a increase in this type of behavior. I am not saying to go out and beat kids sensless, but as the people like to say children today are smarter than they were in the past. Well if that is the case, they know that nothing will happen to them if they act out so they go ahead and do it since it will be the teacher/principals who will face the consequences and not the child themself or their parents.

But then when the legal authorities come in to take over, then they say that it is too "heavy handed" and the system is broke and we are penalizing children for being children. News flash for those who believe that: Children being children need to be disciplined like children and taught what it is to act approoriately in public.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

tmarie- If both parents are working, then one or other needs to get themselves out of the workplace and down to the school. The kid is more important than stacking shelves or pushing a pen, or whatever job the parents are so busy doing they can't see to their own child. Maybe the 6-year-old wouldn't be prone to temper tantrums if her parents were on hand more? Or should they just leave it all up to the school and the police because they're working? If the parents couldn't come to the school because they were both working, then I'd agree with you that they aren't doing their job and don't have a clue.

Six year old don't have temper tantrums.

Yes they do, especially if they've learned that's the only way they can get attention from grown-ups who think they have better/more important things to do.

u can imagine a teenage boy being repeatedly told to stop

Bad class management skills right there. Repeating an order that was ineffectual in the first place is setting things up for escalation.

ignores the staff and then gets in a teacher's face.

So discipline him for getting in the teacher's face, not for burping.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

WTF???

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Cleo, many to most working adults just can't get up and leave work. Just not that simple. Add in how long it could take for the parents to get there... I agree though, more time with the child is needed.

Wyatt you described us behaviour. Not a temper tantrum. If kids know that kicking off gets them what they want that is learned behaviour. Two years olds throw tantrums. Six year old?! Nope. They display the behaviour they are allowed to get away with.

Poor classroom management? How do you suggest a teacher handle it?! 40 kids watching one student disregard the teacher's request. The teacher is well aware it can all kick off depending in how they handle the situation. Asking a few times is normal. In that situation what would you do?! Leaving the class to get help proves you have no management skills. You can't touch the student. You obviously can't ignore the behaviour... Much easier to stare poor management but options are limited. Anger the student and you may well be attacked. How to you suggest disciplining that? I'm sure the kid didn't have the cops called on him for burping. Things start small and escalate. Why?! Because some students today haven't been taught how to behave properly.

I agree with you that it shouldn't be the teacher's job but sadly in dome cases, it is. Clearly this is one of those cases. In a perfect world, teachers could just teach. Instead they are the polite police, babysitters, sex Ed advisors, counsellors, parents, care givers... Parents need to step up and do their job. Sadly though, some aren't and the education dyst, teachers and well behaved students are all paying the price.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Excuse the typos. My iPhone is in a world of its own today.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Just to add, could take the cops five mins to get there. Could take the parents 45. 45 mins of a wild child could be a lot of injuries and damage. A six year old trying to smash windows is clearly one messed up kid who needs to be restrained. For their safety and those around them.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Teachers just can't win these days.

tmarie-You got that right. That's why I give teachers now days all the respect in the world. I couldn't do that job. When I was growing up, the teachers put me inline many times, slap to the back of the head, perfect throw from an eraser, chalk to forhead, you name it. It was the Aloha way! Nowdays, teachers have to put up with rude students and monster parents....and smile. It's not fair.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

If the kid was actually acting like that, the cops should have put that taser to use.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I'm an expat American living in an eastern European country and in my year here I've not seen one kid behave badly, they all respect all adults here. But back home in America . . . Most parents think the TV or the X-Box(etc) and a cell phone are all a child needs to learn how to behave. School has become free day care for working parents and there are far too many single parent homes. As some of you have said "God help the teacher who touches a child" and as it was pointed out the children know this and will take advantage. Having the child "arrested" by the police and hauled off to jail not only provides a lesson to the disruptive child, it gives the educators in the child's school a much needed authority boost as now the other children know what will happen to them if the act the same way. Schools are also being forced to record everything now as too many parent refuse to believe that their child is capable of such poor behavior, "NO, not my little Johnny!" And then there are parents who actually teach their children that they are ABOVE the law, yes it happens my first wife was killed by such a teenager and it was shown in court that his mother taught him he was above the law.

Being an educator in America today has become both thankless and very dangerous!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There ought to be a "law" [child appropriate] here in Japan that prohibits "kanchos". For some reason it is sociabablly acceptable here in Japan but in most western countries, especially the U.S., the child would be arrested or at least charged with sexual assault. It's bad enough when they do it in the but, but when they do it in "front", it is particularly bad. Very bad habit but it happens every year when the 1st graders start early in the year. I'm an ALT here in Japan and I blame schools/staff/parents for not teaching their "boys" better. Girls have on accession done it but it's by "see and do". I've actually seen teachers do it too. Disgusting to say the least. New job Vacancy Announcement: "Anti-Kancho Crime Prevention". Inquire within.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@cleo

If both parents are working, then one or other needs to get themselves out of the workplace and down to the school.

You're mistaking the US for Britain, where the Tardis makes your plan more practicable.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If a kancho is the worst thing you have to complain about... Japanese kids aren't all that violent but misbehave in other ways.

Frank, I agree with most of your comments but don't think single parent families are the main problem. Parents usually have similar backgrounds and parenting styles so one bad parent might actually be better than two. A lot of single moms I know back have work hard to raise their kids. Personally speaking, my mom was a single mom for a while and she did a damn good job. And watching her struggle taught me to work hard and make sure I can look after myself. Being a single parent doesn't mean a kid will be any worse than those with two parents at home. Minst might be tight but the attitude and care is the same.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

cleo: And what should the school have done the time it took the parents to get off work, come to the school, then complain (especially in Japan with the 'monster parents'!), while one single child completely disrupts the system? Change the system? sure! but how? That's part of why this is making news, and hopefully things WILL change, but there is nothing else the teacher could have done in this situation, and clearly the Principal was also present and trying to difuse things, only to have things thrown at him. S/he was right to call in the police. I DON'T think the police were right in cuffing the kid and hauling her off to the station, though.

As for what parents should or shouldn't do, ideally it would be great if at least one parent is home to take care of the kids (when the kids are at home... not sure why they have to be there when the kids are not), but for many it is not only impractical, but impossible with the economy the way it is and expenses. Is it any wonder why another thread popped up today pointing out record lows in children born? You can't have and raise them with both parents working as it is, let alone expect a parent to stay home and do it.

My only concern for this child is that the parents will convince her that the school is 100% to blame and she is 100% innocent, she'll grow complacent and spoiled, and more or less do the same in the future, to worse effect. I HOPE instead the parents can console her, point out the aspects of what the school did that they think was excessive, but also talk to her about how she could better express herself. The schools also need to better teach their teachers on how to handle disciplinary issues (not in this case, per se, but in the burping and cell phone cases for sure!). Anyway, one thing I AM glad about is that they have suspensions and expulsion in schools in other nations, because looking at some schools here I can say they really, really need it. Education is a privilage, not to be abused. When children know there is ZERO repercussions for their actions all hell breaks loose.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Kid has issues that need to be addressed, having all now come to a head I hope this kid and her parents get these issues addressed.

Maybe she hasnt been disciplined properly at home, maybe she has mental health problems who knows but lets just hope what ever it is gets sorted before she grows up into a wild out of control teenager or adult throwing tantrums.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

she'll grow complacent and spoiled, and more or less do the same in the future, to worse effect. Too late for that I think. As for her parents, the fact that they are crying about it and have a lawyer... Don't think her parents are going to tell her it was her fault for being a spoiled and out of control brat. They're probably used to it.

Personally, am glad they cuffed her and took her to the station. I am sure she was scared and I hope she remember it next time she decides to pull this crap.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Nice to see new from Georgia making the world stage.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is complety different from the girl who was arrested and handcuffed in front of the whole school for doodling on her desk in New York. That was outrageous. In this case, if she was that out of control, the handcuffs are called for. A six year old throwing things can hurt you or herself.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I was around nine, I believe when I did something similar in class, though not to this extreme. I remember ripping posters off the walls, yelling and screaming. I wouldn't have hurt anyone else, but other students might not have known that or the teacher. However, that was thirty years ago, and at the time my parent's marriage was failing, frequent arguments and fights, and I had already been sexually abused for almost two years.

What this article tells me, from the child's behavior, there are some serious underlying issues that fueled this child's acting out. As some suggest, it is not always a child has been spoilt and are used to having their way. In my case, in a post-military home, you would not dare to ever voice your opinion or act out for any reason because you were beaten badly or otherwise punished severely. This resulted in anger that came out in other areas.

As an adult who later went into law enforcement, I know teachers cannot touch students anymore the way we used to get a "paddling", which I got for my outburst and then I was later beaten at home much worse. Teachers and schools can and do often get sued, just like police officers, and in the latter case...many often took out insurance policies in just such an event. Schools and teachers have gotten sued and accused so often, and too often unjustly, that this is the current solution: bringing the police in. The society itself has created that aspect of the issue.

I don't believe the child should have been taken away from the school in handcuffs, but the handcuffing itself may have been warranted. In any case, no matter how the child acted or why, being handcuffed, led away by adults into a holding situation will be traumatizing. Yes, it can result in the child never doing such again, but it can equally and conversely result in a deep distrust and hatred of the mis or overuse of authority as well.

I think the underlying factors of this case should be taken into consideration and the homelife itself be looked into. The parents actions do seem opportunistic to blow this out of proportion when its very likely the homelife and examples they set for their child is the root cause of the outburst.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@tmarie "Personally, am glad they cuffed her and took her to the station. I am sure she was scared and I hope she remember it next time she decides to pull this crap."

Believe me, as a former law enforcement officer who regularly took people to jail, it is traumatizing for adults, beyond scary for many, and a psychological event that can affect them the rest of their life. And that's for an adult, cognizant of what it really means. For a child to go through the same? And you're glad it happened to the child? Glad I think is the wrong word, because if you are glad something bad happens to someone even a child, I think that shows something about you.

No matter what her behavior was, she is still a child, with children being under control from adults or others. She was out of control. Through cuffing they brought her under control. I am absolutely sure there were secure offices to keep the child in until parents are notified and arrive to pick her up. Taking a child to the station, in a holding area was the extreme.

Even if we may stop and cuff a suspect at the scene, especially if a minor, the officers have some leeway to remain there and not take it a "level up" as it were. If the person has no priors, has calmed and no immediate threat is perceived or that a true crime has been committed, we have the option to get their information, contact parents, let them be picked up and then later follow-up.

The officers didn't have to take her to the station. That is my only problem in this situation. The teachers only did what they could, as did the school. To reinterate, even the cuffing wasn't unwarranted, but transporting a 6 y.o. to the station was both unnecessary and extreme.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Ah, the times we feel good about being an expat.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Glad I think is the wrong word, because if you are glad something bad happens to someone even a child, I think that shows something about you.

And what exactly does it say? Go on, I'm curious.

-10 ( +0 / -10 )

it is traumatizing for adults, beyond scary for many, and a psychological event that can affect them the rest of their life. And that's for an adult, cognizant of what it really means. For a child to go through the same? And you're glad it happened to the child? Glad I think is the wrong word, because if you are glad something bad happens to someone even a child, I think that shows something about you.

Well then, maybe it will give that child to think before acting like a fool again..wont it.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

it is traumatizing for adults, beyond scary for many, and a psychological event that can affect them the rest of their life. And that's for an adult, cognizant of what it really means. For a child to go through the same? And you're glad it happened to the child? Glad I think is the wrong word, because if you are glad something bad happens to someone even a child, I think that shows something about you.

Well then, maybe it will give that child to think before acting like a fool again..wont it.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

tmarie: "Personally, am glad they cuffed her and took her to the station. I am sure she was scared and I hope she remember it next time she decides to pull this crap."

I still think that element of this whole thing was too extreme, and hence it gives the parents fuel for their cause and sympathy. I think I would be pretty miffed, as a parent, if I had to go and pick up my SIX year old child at the station (and see him/her in cuffs!). It could have ended a lot better for all parties.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

*she'll grow complacent and spoiled, and more or less do the same in the future, to worse effect. Too late for that I think. As for her parents, the fact that they are crying about it and have a lawyer... Don't think her parents are going to tell her it was her fault for being a spoiled and out of control brat. They're probably used to it.

Personally, am glad they cuffed her and took her to the station. I am sure she was scared and I hope she remember it next time she decides to pull this crap.**

You do realise you are a vile person, who lacks any empathy, any understanding of what it is to be a child, or what it is to raise one. Do me a favour and get therapy. You are sick for wishing suffering and fear on a LITTLE KID of 6 years old, who just got out of control, either due to mental health problems or issues at home. Never, ever have kids Marie, you would be a terrible mother.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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