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Putin defies West in fiery address over Crimea

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As the sanctions pile up, it wouldn't be surprising if Putin decides "What the heck!" and goes for annexing a much larger chunk of the Ukraine. Who knows, he might even go for the whole thing. Why not? If Russia's economy is possibly going to choke on Crimea, then what does it matter? Not sayin' that it's right, but from a Russian point of view, just swallow up the whole thing right now in one fell swoop.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

presto345 History repeats itself. Remember Hungary, the tanks, the Russian aggression?

So first of all - thank you for your long post.

History really repeats itself because people don't learn its lessons

Hungary was Hitler ally and took part in aggression against USSR

After defeat it was natural that Germans and Hungarians hate Russia

Berlin 1952 Budapest 1956....

Just one example. Putin thinks it's so funny: he's pictured as the bad guy, although the sheep in the Duma all say baa-baa (nothing better to say) supporting him, he thinks he can do as he likes,

You know : Most Russian supporting him

about grabbing land he and Russia are not entitled to,

Sevastopol is a old Russian naval base (and most famous one)

I can't call him a thug,

So I'm Russian and I have vote for him as most of Russian

As far as I understand you simply dislike Russia ? here the problem?

Yes, I think it's funny he is threatening the west for threatening Russia's aggression with sanctions.

Hm nobody was killed - and nobody from civilians was pressed to leave Crimea but this is agression?

So what you can say about Kosovo ?

thousands were killed by bombs and rockets

about 200 000 Serbs were removed from Kosovo by force ...

But it is NOT agression ?

Russia is bad and NATO is holy peace loving organisation

and so on and so on...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Putin crammed Obama's reset button down Hillary's throat and is now taking victory laps around the Kremlin.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"Well the media hoohaa over The Crimea certainly took away the attention from the overthrow of the legitimate government of the Ukraine. Whatever its short comings, the Ukrainian government was an elected government by the people."

Yeah, just like the "legitimate" government of Egypt's radical Islamic Morsi was overthrown after the people found out what he was up to. The Ukranian people found out what Yanukovych was up to, cozying up to Russia and snubbing the EU, and threw him out.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Crimea was actually part of Russia until it was "donated" to the Ukraine in the ex Sovjet Union by a (probably drunk) Chrishtshew. The Crimea is an existential and historical part of Russia. I am really flabbergasted that our Western leaders now want to start a new Crimean war, like 100 years ago. Which also was started purely for political reasons in order to weaken Russia and help the (then) Ottoman empire.

And to top if off, these are the same leaders who had no problem promoting the break-up of Yugoslavia, and then actively went to war to break up Serbia even more.

And now the same people lecture us that country that is deeply divided must never be split? How hypocritical can you get?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Democracy needs limits as well. Let's not be naive here.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Putin signed the treaty with Crimean prime minister Sergei Aksyonov after over 97 percent of Crimeans voted in favor of joining Russia in a disputed referendum on Sunday.

Russian lawmakers, who still have to ratify the treaty although it comes into force immediately, broke into raucous applause after the signing.

97 percent of Crimeans voted in favor. Isn't a popular vote the Democratic way?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

The fact that Putin is starting to slam the sanctions means that somebody finally got his attention.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

History repeats itself. Remember Hungary, the tanks, the Russian aggression? Just one example. Putin thinks it's so funny: he's pictured as the bad guy, although the sheep in the Duma all say baa-baa (nothing better to say) supporting him, he thinks he can do as he likes, he knows his great show the Olympics are over and he can show the world now what else he is capable of. He is not considering another Olympics. At least not the sportive one. His olympics are about consolidating power, about grabbing land he and Russia are not entitled to, gambling no one will oppose him. I can't call him a thug, but he is dumb for believing aggression in the western hemisphere, with the EU as neighbors, will help a cause that show similarities to what dictators have attempted in the past. Funny. Yes, I think it's funny he is threatening the west for threatening Russia's aggression with sanctions. He wonders why he is blamed for destabilizing the political climate. The KGB days were different, he thinks. No kidding, this man is dangerous.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wasn't western Poland annexed by the Third Reich because there were ethnic Germans there? Same with Austria? All Putin needs is a silly little 'tache.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Bye bye Japan-Russia Peace Treaty ending WWII and bye bye Etorofu and Kunashiri. Besides Japan is risking a tenth of its natural gas, and 5% of its crude oil. Very bad news for Abe.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Putin is doing what he needed to do for the best of his nation. Yes, what he has done is completely repugnant, but he is the leader of his nation and his interests were threatened.

If he truly feared the EU he would not have moved into Crimea. But, the EU is as solid as a bowl of jelly and he knows that he has more friends than enemies there and can do as he wishes.

The Russian Military is as strong as the rust that is holding it's Naval ships together. What is really keeping it from being torn to small pieces is the oil they are providing.

If the oil stops they worlds fragile economy would fall apart and Putin knows it.

Before I hear the nay sayers yelling and screaming let me make my point.

If a regional war were to breakout Russian oil would stop flowing to the west. Russian oil stops flowing prices go up. Prices go up then costs go up for major corporations and that would cut into their profits. Profits are cut and bonuses are also cut for the Execs. Bonuses are cut for the execs and those execs can't buy phat diamond rings for their 20-something girlfriends. Girlfriends get mad and call the wives and those execs have to pay huge sums in alimony. So then they have to raise prices more to pay for those expenses and the cycle continues.

So, if all nation just overlook the abuses by the Russian federation the world keeps turning.....

So in other words the Ukraine crises will be treated the same way the Georgian crises was treated. It will be swept under a rug and the bones of the dead will be forgotten.

But, those execs and those billionaires keep forgetting one big thing, people don't forget.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

When over 90 percent of the people VOTE to change their status isnt that called DEMOCRACY?

It depends, doesn't it? If 90% of the people of Okinawa voted without the sanction of the Japan central government to be part of the USA, would that justify the American military spreading out from their bases, patrolling Okinawa with guns and saying "We respect the voice of the people. Okinawa is now a part of the USA" - would that be okay?

The fact that Putin sent in the Russian military but in unmarked uniforms speaks volumes.

Without a doubt, there have been double standards from the EU - Yanukovych was an elected leader, after all - but the people of Crimea should have forced the Ukrainian government to hold a referendum, as the SNP did in Scotland. Russia has annexed Crimea. That's a fact in law.

I do understand Putin's concern about Ukraine having closer ties to the EU, and the potential for NATO troops to be stationed on his doorstep, but he overstepped the mark here. He has said he has no plans to annex other parts of the Ukraine, but we'll have to wait and see because his argument that Crimea always belonged to Russia could be applied to other areas too.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

When over 90 percent of the people VOTE to change their status isnt that called DEMOCRACY?

90% of the people who voted, not 90% of the population. 58% of the population of Crimea are ethnic Russians, with 24% being ethnic Ukranians and 12% being Tatars, who refused to vote. Now, unless all of the Ukranians voted to join Russia, how does that make 97% in favour? Something stinks.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Putin doesn't want Crimea. He wants the Ukraine. He's hoping that by taking over Crimea it will somehow help him with his larger goal. We can argue about what the vote in Crimea means but it's all just a distraction while Putin makes his other plans.

What he needs next is a spark, but so far the Ukraine hasn't given it to them. My guess is that Putin will continue to increase the force used on the military bases until someone finally shoots back. The Russians already killed an officer yesterday. He'll also work to disrupt things in East Ukraine in hopes of saying once again that Russian tanks are needed.

The Russian media has been working hard to paint the pro-Russians as the victims of aggression even though nearly all of the deaths are on the pro-European side. Funny how editorials about the Russian language ban can cover up things like that. Most of the rhetoric paints Russia as the victim in all of this, the victims of a Western coup, the victims of pro-Europeans, the victims of the West trying to keep Russia down.

We'll see if the European/US response can convince him to stop, but it's not easy when he's essentially a dictator in his own backyard. Being a part of the international community does have it's good points, though. I'm sure Putin enjoys being in the G8. He wants Russia to be an international player but he's squandering a lot of that for one country. The West knows that the Ukraine is his endgame and manufacturing a justification to go there will be harder that the one he manufactured for Crimea.

And wouldn't you know it, his buddy Snowden just released new information today.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

In 2012 a contentious law was passed that allowed the use of "regional languages", that included Tatar, Hungarian, Romanian and crucially Russian, subsequently 13 out of Ukraine’s 27 regions, mostly in the eastern part of the country, rapidly adopted Russian as a second 'official' language.

The Russian language is spoken by about approximately 24% of the Ukrainian population, whilst approximately 18% of the Ukrainian population are ethnic Russians However temporary repeal of the 2012 law was akin to waving a red rag at a bull, or prodding a Russian bear with the wrong end of a pencil, the fallout from this repel reached from Ukraine to Moscow and even in the European Union winced.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev proceeded to throw an almighty wobblier at one point he resembled a human being trying to lay a egg, to quote:

“We do not understand what is going on there. There is a real threat to our Russian interests and to the lives and health of our citizens”

inferring that the new interim government in Kiev lacks legitimacy.

Interim President Oleksandr Turchynov has since vetoed that repeal, which in turn vindicated Russian speakers already heightened perceived concerns of the growing discrimination against them.

Oh for the benefit of hindsight.........

Ominously Russians constitute approximately 27% of Latvia, the largest ethnic group of minorities.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm just wondering about the initial choice to refuse the help from the E.U. in favor of Moscow. As I saw, some nations (smaller ones) situation turned worse than it was previously after entering the E.U. While I don't know about the pre-revolt situation of Ukraine, I do know that the economics weren't top level, and there would be a chance of further degradation.

Blind men are the same as lambs led into the wolf den. Chances are there is no wolf, but if there is, oh boy your situation is bad. Without thinking people take the side which is more popular (this case U.S.) and tend to ignore whatever is on the other side. Don't you see that you are the ones closing the Iron Curtain once again?

Didn't U.S. invade a bunch of nations under the pretext of bringing democracy (if you have oil)? Didn't the U.S. dictate what to do, who to be elected as president (who of course is pro U.S.)? And after things have settled, why didn't it pull out it's units from those said nations? I'd say U.S. is no different from Russia. At least Putin didn't start the whole annexation deal by himself, the Crimean people voted for it. Isn't democracy all about the people being able to freely decide what they want? How come votes are legal when serves the government and not when it serves the people.

And for those who say that the vote was forced by the Russian military. I didn't see anybody crying as they were holding Crimean and Russian flags high. I didn't see terrified citizens on the streets when the Russian army was present.

N. Korea is under terror rule, atrocities were committed through 60 years by the ruling families that could be on par with the Nazi atrocities. Nobody's doing a damn thing about it. Only talks. People decide they want to annex their land to another country and everybody flips their mind.

And furthermore the sanctions again'ts Russia is only tolerated till Putin decides it's enough. As I see it, a band of knights are poking a dragon with sticks. Yamamoto Isoroku's sleeping giant quote when they attacked Pearl Harbor "I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve.", will history repeat it self?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@jimizo

I agree. We are very fortunate that some hard nosed republican isn't in office at this particular time. Imagine if McCain, Cheney, Bush or Romney were at the helm right now? We'd be in deep trouble...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

'I cannot understand all of the criticism of Obama for being weak. What is he supposed to do? Declare war?'

I think Incan understand the criticism of Obama. It's the usual lame Republican attempts to discredit Obama with hypotheticals of how a 'strong' president could have made Putin think twice. Some seem to have forgotten that the last Republican strongman in power famously said that he knew he could work with 'Vladimir' in good faith after seeing him wearing his mother's cross. At least Obama isn't that delusional.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Well done Ukraine! Boo Crimea for not making the choice nine out of ten NATO countries recommend. That seems to be the mantra of most of the press.

While Putin IS a thug 99.9% of the time to be sure, he IS right this time. It truly is hypocritical to support the Western backed coup in the Ukraine, while simultaneously denouncing the decision of most Crimeans to be Russian-all simply because they are not flying the same team colors.

This is very similar to the way the media helped Bush and Blair build support for the Iraq war which had been deemed a contravention of international law by the UN even before boots hit the ground. The world needs to think a bit more wisely on this because the stakes are potentially much higher..

Sanctions...because everybody is doing it is ridiculous. Newspapers reporting that politicians the world over are using words like 'deplorable' to describe the Crimeans' choice not to remain part of a newly post-revolutionary state? It is absolutely absurd.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

To begin with, Russia did not hold a gun to Crimea's head. They did not have to. Autonomy, independence, rejoining Russia were in the air for many years. Check out the aborted (by Kiev) 1992 referendum and especially the 1994 referendum and its consequences. Furthermore, violent protests by Russian Crimeans was sparked by a Nov. 24, 2013 a parliamentary repeal of a law that allowed official non-Ukrainian languages official status in regions where the speakers were at least 10% of the population. The Russians feared discrimination. The acting president vetoed the repeal, but the damage was done.

Putin knew that Crimea was not Hungary and that for the first time in recent memory Russian troops would be welcomed on foreign soil.

The vote on the referendum expressed the will of the people, even if there was tinkering to boost the percentages. The 1994 referendum was a benchmark. Close to 80% of the people voted for greater Crimean autonomy and for the right to dual citizenship. So far I have seen no evidence of any tinkering with the ballot and if there was let the Western powers call for another referendum, which will force them to recognize it.

There is a supreme irony in this whole business is that the Western Europe and the US immediately recognized a new Ukrainian government that came in when a mob overthrew a democratically elected government but will not recognize a referendum that democratically expressed a people will to self-determination.

The Ukrainian constitution has provision for removing a president through impeachment. That is carefully ignored when calling the referendum unconstitutional. Kiev's attack on the unconstitutionality of the referendum was affected by a government that was already unconstitutional.

International law does not recognize constitutional provisions as necessarily legitimate blocks to secession.

Another sticky matter is how Crimea was transferred from Russia to Ukraine in 1954. I was an authoritarian act carried out by Khrushchev without prior consultation and approval.

Now that the Russian annexation of Crimea is fact of life let us see what Russia does with this once semi-autonomous region, other than maintain its Black Sea fleet.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It will be interesting to see Putin's reaction when, in the not too distant future, China takes over the Russian far east on the pretext of "protecting Chinese citizens".

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

The Western nations really need to refresh their play books I think. They just look ridiculous.

They need to start pushing their muscles again, damn everybody else's opinions, especially people in nations who won't be putting anything at stake.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

I thought he made quite a bit of sense in his speech.

AKBfan -- you must live in the same alternate universe as Putin. Because like him you conveniently ignored the 1984 treaty that Russia signed QUARANTEEING Ukraine's territorial integrity so they would give up their nukes. What "made sense" -- that because he thinks it was a mistake for Russia to give Crimea to Ukraine that they have the unilateral right to annex it? Or that because he feels the fall of the Iron Curtain was terrible, that he can simply re-write history?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@sfjp330Mar

If you notice, International observers were kicked out of Crimea, and nobody was there to verify attendance and count, except groups, assigned from Kremlin. Ukrainian and foreign journalists were kicked out and equipment destroyed.

No, I could not notice that. What I noticed is that 50 politicians and observers from 21 countries, including US, Israel, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Finland, Bulgaria, Greece, etc. observed the referendum. Also, I noticed that none of them reported any significant irregularities. OSCE mission was invited too, but they rejected the invitation (rather than "kicked out") because they don't recognize its legality. Indeed, the legality of the referendum, rather than the numbers in the results seem to be the main source of controversy and disputes.

Not a big fan of either side in the recent events in Ukraine, but have to acknowledge - according to the opinions of many Crimean, the referendum was an easy choice for them - they claim they are absolutely sure they don't want to be a part of this:

http://hinter-der-fichte.blogspot.fr/2014/03/ukraine-die-kernluge-von-der-legitimen.html

(in German, but photos are self-explaining. Also, Google can help translating it)

2 ( +5 / -3 )

At this stage, I call the score Putin 2, Obama 0. (I'm neither American, Russian nor Syrian.)

The Western nations really need to refresh their play books I think. They just look ridiculous.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Russia is doomed to perpetual slow growth and the international irrelevance that will eventually accompany it. "

Given all the oil / gas and the rest of the vast natural resources Russia posesses and trades ...I somehow really doubt that.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Putin is very paranoid and lives in an alternate world but I have to admit he acts like he knows what he's doing. (I sometimes wonder if his version of story may be true.) I like how his eyes pierce right through Obama's facade, seeing the real car salesman within. Putin must be laughing from the inside wondering how Americans were duped by such an amateur fraud.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

"I guess when you have gun pointed to your direction you can call it 'DEMOCRACY"."

I guess when you occupy a city center, put up barricades, burn tyres and fight with police to overthrow an elected president ( even if he is unpopular ) instead of voting for change at a ballot box, you call THAT democracy too?

With clear majority of the Crimean population being ethnic Russian they dont need a gun to their head to overwhelmingly vote for integration with Russia. I,m not particularly a Russia fan but the West is being selectively hypocrytical at best given its own history in supporting separation of Kosovo etc. Cant have it both ways all the time i guess.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

We just wait and see how the economic sanction works. FYI, Russian government annual budget is based on $75/barrel of oil export.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Taiwanese would hope for Putin's support in the future.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Let's hope that Putin meant what he said about not wanting or needing to break up Ukraine, and just leaves the matter at Crimea. I doubt that the sanctions will cause Russia to return Crimea to Ukraine, but perhaps with enough negotiations, the situation can at least be de-escalated into an uneasy peace.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Still he has a point. Why do we support some "uprisings" but not others? Why does a situation have to degenerate into bloodshed before action can be taken? Why if Crimea has only been "part of Ukraine" for 50 years or so is this being touted as a huge reversal of history? I have to say that the NATO and US approach to thisdoes smack a little of hypocrisy.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Yes Putin, all countries in the world should be able to annex another country if they don't like their government. Also regions based on ethnicity should be able to secede from a country if they also don't like their government. With that farcical attitude, the US could probably be split into about 100 separate countries.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Bully Put-in and Russian force shamefully display no honor when they entered Crimea in disguise without showing Russian insignia on their uniforms. He preaches to the choir thus reflecting his nonsense on others. It seems glorious for mother Russia at the moment, but your empire will crumble when the choking policy of oil, gas, and gun power will no longer needed. Stalin statue faces the ground many time, so do Put-in. What a shame!

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

MarkGMar. 19, 2014 - 09:40AM JST

While Obama focuses on Obama care the comunists, ex-comunists and dictators of the world plot to strengthen and re-allign themselves.

I cannot understand all of the criticism of Obama for being weak. What is he supposed to do? Declare war? Russia, in case you've forgotten, has nuclear weapons. It has a large standing army. . Russia standing army has 1.2 million men active military personal. The Russian air force has 4,498 aircraft. A typical carrier has about 87 aircraft. There is no way the US could project enough conventional military strength into the Crimea to eject the Russian army, and to try to do will lead to a nuke war.

Since war is out of the question and potentially suicidal, the only reasonable option Obama has is to try to hurt Putin with sanctions, which is what he's doing. That's not weakness, that's realty. Anyone who thinks Obama being weak has no understanding how it should be handled. Do you want a nuke war? You are crazy!!

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Bass4

Crimea and Alaska are entirely different stories. Crimea was given to Ukraine as special gift by Khrushchev for marking the 300 yrs anniversary of Ukraine inclusion in Russian empire. Crimea was given to Ukraine by Russia. Crimea is door step of Russia.

Alaska was sold to US by Russian Emperor Alexander II with the price of $7.2 million, or about 2 cents per acre ($4.74/km2). Alaska is door step of Canada. Putin has no rights to dishonour the treaty of real estate sale.

I am more worried about the Florida which is heavily populated with ethnic Latino. Their loyalty are questionable as ethnic Russians of Crimea. Right now, they are enjoying Obama-care in the adopted land. If there is not any more care, there will be another Crimea.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Sambhavo PatryckMar. 19, 2014 - 09:35AM JST When over 90 percent of the people VOTE to change their status isnt that called DEMOCRACY?

I guess when you have gun pointed to your direction you can call it 'DEMOCRACY". Crimea is under occupation of Russian military troops.There was no option to vote for status quo on ballot forms. If you notice, International observers were kicked out of Crimea, and nobody was there to verify attendance and count, except groups, assigned from Kremlin. Ukrainian and foreign journalists were kicked out and equipment destroyed. People who abstained from voting, elderly people are persuaded to vote at home by special groups, going from door to door with boxes….and guess who they had to vote for.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

I thought he made quite a bit of sense in his speech. NATO et al must be really naive if they believe russia cares about their views in places like Ukraine and Crimea.....

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

While Obama focuses on Obama care the comunists, ex-comunists and dictators of the world plot to strengthen and re-allign themselves.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

When over 90 percent of the people VOTE to change their status isnt that called DEMOCRACY? ? A fairly peaceful transition compared to all the violent demonstrations that Western powers have supported around the world! Why have there been NO sanctions against the USA for their war crimes? ie: Iraq It would make sense that Blair and Bush should be held accountable for the carnage they have left behind! Shameful hypocracy in the world!

6 ( +9 / -3 )

wattMar. 19, 2014 - 09:15AM JST It is understandable that 60, 70% of people in Crimean peninsula are Russians and want to belong to Russia. I think these Russians have wanted to be annexed to Russia for many years as Ukraine used to be a part of Soviet.

If you put the same justification of Crimea to Taiwan, what if Chinese troops invade Taiwan, and control the entire island? Since China controlled Taiwan many many years ago, do they have right to take over forcefully? If the citizens of Taiwan have a vote, who do you think will win especially with Chinese troops on the ground?

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

I wonder what's Obama going to do when Putin asks to reunite with Alaska and people from Sitka or Skagway? This guy is just nuts!

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

I hope this doesn't escalate.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

kwatt MAR. 19, 2014 - 09:15AM JST

Russian life is probably better than Ukranian?

Crimea needs water from Ukraine. So far there is no land access with Russia. Russia is supplying Gas to Crimea via Ukraine. Life without water and gas is still painful. House without electricity and water supply like man without clothes and shoe.

In my humble opinion, Crimea and Russia have to link with bridge or tunnel for getting better life as Russian of other side of the sea. During the transition period, Crimea residents have to bear the pains for lack of infrastructure and limited pain of western transition.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

" “They were shooting from the same location at both the self-defense forces and at the p servicemen,” Crimean police force spokeswoman Olga Kondrashova told the Interfax news agency."" So, here again are unknown gunmen firing at both sides, acting as agents provocateurs. Sounds like Kiev.

For Dog's sake, let the citizens determine for themselves whether they wish to align with either or neither.

6 ( +12 / -6 )

Could Russia afford to substain Crimea? Unless Putin immediately undertakes radical and far-reaching reforms, Russia is doomed to perpetual slow growth and the international irrelevance that will eventually accompany it. Well if Russia’s economy stagnates forever that will obviously be an enormous problem for the authorities. Much of Putin's popularity is a result of the huge improvement in living standards over the past decade. With the problems of Crimea, if those improvements suddenly come to a crashing halt that would eventually cause a systemic crisis. Performance legitimacy in Crimea implies that the authorities are able to hold up their end of the bargain and deliver on the goods; if they can’t do that, things can get ugly pretty quickly. Prolonged economic decline in Russia is the surest route to political crisis.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

It is understandable that 60, 70% of people in Crimean peninsula are Russians and want to belong to Russia. I think these Russians have wanted to be annexed to Russia for many years as Ukraine used to be a part of Soviet. Russian life is probably better than Ukranian?

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Well the media hoohaa over The Crimea certainly took away the attention from the overthrow of the legitimate government of the Ukraine. Whatever its short comings, the Ukrainian government was an elected government by the people. The same government ejected my an unruly mob, history would say this was a coup, the cause of which was, as rumours do create, helped by the americans. This by the way is not my assumption, but as reported by the media itself. Now the major power players are upset about the intention of the people of The Crimea, casting their democratic vote, to join the protection of the Russian Federation, obviously this was not expected or in their plans. Its just like watching a big chess game, Putin having the last move,creating check I think, now major power players its your move. Interesting point in the game, because the next move could be a game changer.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Not accordinfg to the Ukranian government.

Which one?

Diplomats in Brussels said EU and Ukrainian leaders would on Friday sign the political portion of a landmark pact whose rejection by Yanukovych in November sparked the protests that led to his fall

In who's name? So non elected leaders will sign some agreement that will tie up a nation? I'm not even Ukrainian but this upsets me.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Amazing, GW Bush famously said he could look into Putin's eyes and know he could trust him, and Obama was going to "reset" the relationship with Russia. He has made both men look extremely stupid. First Georgia and now Crimea.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

"The Republic of Crimea"

Not accordinfg to the Ukranian government.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

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