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Russia expels 20 Czech diplomats; says Prague took hostile step

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Putin is taking a page from Lil Kim. He is lashing out because his grip on power is diminishing. I do not see Putin ever being voted out but kicked out from a coup!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@Numan

What was he supposed to do in response, just say "Thank you, may I have another"? This is how the reciprocity principle works, but obviously it's news to some people.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

More hostile than blowing up an arms depot in a foreign country using the same 2 agents who tried to murder a dissident using a chemical weapon?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

NumanToday  07:51 am JST

Putin is taking a page from Lil Kim. 

Lesse - war with Georgia and Ukraine, killing dissents who fled to the UK, messing around in Syria, and cyberwar, cyberwar, cyberwar. And now this.

He is lashing out because his grip on power is diminishing.

He's peeved now that his lapdog Diaper Don is out of power and the US isn't orbiting him. The USA fell out off his hands now and he's SAD SAD SAD. And now this 'hostile step' because his hand was in the Czech cookie jar. Go sulk in a corner and drown your sorrows with vodka, Vladimir. WAH!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Russia does not like being found out and exposed. It's the elaborate denials, explanations and double-speak that follow that prove tiresome and wearying. The Czech diplomats probably already had their bags packed, knowing there would be tit-for-tat retaliation.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Putin is taking a page from Lil Kim. He is lashing out because his grip on power is diminishing.

I guess 80% popularity can be considered diminishing. Russian like a strong man and not a CIA sponsored guy like...

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I guess 80% popularity can be considered diminishing. Russian like a strong man and not a CIA sponsored guy like...

It's at 63% now, so if you thought it was at 80%, then that's a big 17-point drop

https://www.imrussia.org/en/analysis/3258-levada-center-polls-offer-a-bird%E2%80%99s-eye-view-of-what-russians-think-right-now

In February 2020, 69 percent of Russians approved of Vladimir Putin. As of March 2021, his popularity rests at 63 percent. For the Russian government, throughout 2020, approval hovered around 50 percent, dipping slightly in the first two months of 2021 to 47 percent and then recovering to 49 percent in March, all of which is within the margin of error. The State Duma demonstrates similar stability, entering 2020 with an approval rating of 41 percent, which remains only increased by one percent in 2021. Still, with new parliamentary elections slated for September this year, the regime might run into some troubles mobilizing the base, as the approval rating for the pro-Putin United Russia party dropped to 27 percent—the lowest point over the last five years.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Cancelled Czechs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nobody here knows the details of this diplomatic spat, but predictably the anti-Russia propaganda of the legacy news shows its results and we get the typical kneejerk comments.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

the anti-Russia propaganda of the legacy news shows its results and we get the typical kneejerk comments.

Aye, tis a conspiracy to keep the benevolent Putin down. A conspiracy, I tell ya! Damn MSM and their Deep State minders, all funded by Soros.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nobody here knows the details of this diplomatic spat, but predictably the anti-Russia propaganda of the legacy news shows its results and we get the typical kneejerk comments.

But we do know many of the details

https://japantoday.com/category/world/update-2-czechs-expel-18-russian-envoys-allege-russian-link-to-ammunition-depot-blast#comment-2437044

it's different names on the passports but the same faces on the passport photos, plus passports list they're from Tajikistan and Moldova, instead of Russia in their Salisbury passports. But they used the same names at Prague Airport as the ones in Salisbury, UK

   For Czech police, that included the October 2014 explosion. A crucial find was an email sent to Imex Group, the company which operated the depot.

   The email claimed to come from the National Guard of Tajikistan (it was later traced to an user in Russia). It asked for two men to be given access to the site for an inspection visit. Scans of their passports were attached. The men were said to be Ruslan Tabarov from Tajikistan and Nicolaj Popa, a Moldovan citizen.

   The pictures on the passports match those of the two men accused by Britain of the Salisbury poisoning.

   The two men travelled to the UK in March 2018 under the names Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov. The pair then appeared on Russian TV denying involvement, claiming they were sports nutritionists who visited Salisbury to see the spire of the cathedral.

   On 11 October 2014, the men used the same cover identities they used in Salisbury - Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov - to arrive at Prague airport. They stayed in Prague for two days. They then booked into accommodation in Ostrava, near the ammunition depot on 13 October. They were booked to stay until the 17 October.

   The explosion took place on the 16th, and that day the pair headed to Vienna airport to fly to Moscow. The only people to die were two innocent Czech men working at the depot. Czech police issued pictures of the two suspects saying they wanted to speak to them. Russian authorities say their constitution prevents the men being extradited.

   Why would Russian intelligence blow up the arms depot? One of the people storing weapons there was a Bulgarian arms dealer called Emilian Gebrev

   In April 2015, six months after the Czech explosion, Gebrev fell seriously ill in the Bulgarian capital Sofia. After a month in hospital, he was released but then fell sick again. Despite suspicions, Bulgarian authorities made little progress amid talk it was simply food poisoning. It was only after events in Salisbury in 2018 that people paid more attention.

   Surveillance of that car park released by a Bulgarian prosecutor last year shows one man approaching the cars of Gebrev, as well as his son and business partner who would also fall ill. A toxic substance is believed to have been smeared on the handles - similar to the way Novichok was placed on the handle of Sergei Skripal's house.

   The pair involved in Salisbury and now linked to the Czech explosion have not been seen since they were identified in 2018.

Same photos, different names and countries on the passports, same poisoning technique - this should dispel any more ideas that they're mere tourists

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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