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Singapore warns foreigners to obey its laws

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I hope those singaporean drivers will obey the speed limits of malaysia highway when they are travelling.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I remember when Billy Crystal quipped at an Oscar awards ceremony, "We were also going to broadcast Singapore, but the crew was hanged at the airport."

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@Ghazi Singaporeans, anywhere in the world must obey the country's laws otherwise they should be appropriately dealt with. This applies to Malaysia!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I like Singapore tough laws , overall a nice place to visit. No gum rule is awesome streets are clean , they have a amnesty box before you enter customs so any fool with a brain on his shoulders can discard their illegal goods which surprises me when I read the news about someone getting busted for drugs considering its clearly stated on the customs form drugs is punishable by death.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

fair explanation and a just punishment.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

when I read the news about someone getting busted for drugs considering its clearly stated on the customs form drugs is punishable by death.

Me too. But maybe the reward for the smugglers for successfully getting the drugs in is so high that some just can't resist taking the risk.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I like Singapore tough laws , overall a nice place to visit.

Still you have to wonder about a place that tries to present a modern, international image to the world, and yet can't handle the idea of 100 people engaging in peaceful demonstrations, either by its own citizens, or by foreign residents. This is why Singapore is and long has been a laughing stock.

"It's clean, wealthy, and stable" is a pitiful excuse for the suppression of rights in Singapore. East and Southeast Asia have changed immensely in the last few decades; Singapore clings to its paranoia, which can be traced right to the Lee dynasty.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

They still have that silly no chewing gum law?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

There are demonstrations in Singapore, sometimes. The latest was 4,000 people protesting the the gov't's immigration policies a couple of months ago.

The issue here seems to be that foreigners shouldn't be doing it.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

They still have that silly no oral sex unless it's used as a form of foreplay law?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Serrano, you really don't like Singapore, do you?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

There are demonstrations in Singapore, sometimes.

There are demonstrations in China sometimes.

The event you refer to has been described both as "rare" - for the fact of a demo taking place at all - and one of the largest demonstrations in Singapore's history.

It remains a fact that the government of Singapore uses a variety of methods to stop demonstrations occurring and to make citizens understand that they can pay a heavy price for crossing the authorities, as this little description shows.

"In 2008, around 20 people — children included — gathered outside Parliament House to protest against the rising cost of living in Singapore. The protesters, mostly associated with the Singapore Democratic Party (SDP), carried placards and wore T-shirts that read Tak Boleh Tahan, meaning “Cannot Take It” in Malay. (The phrase is also commonly used in Singlish [.....].)

Eighteen protesters, including SDP’s Secretary-General Chee Soon Juan, were arrested and charged under the Public and Nuisance Act on two counts: for participating in an assembly, and for participating in a procession without a permit. Fines of up to S$2,000 (approx. US$1,588) or jail terms of up to two weeks were meted out."

http://wagingnonviolence.org/feature/protest-culture-in-singapore-wait-what/

That's only really the beginning of it, because these are direct punishments for what are supposedly transgressions of actual laws. In addition, Singapore is a pretty active police state, and public sector workers, people living in public housing, and citizens in general know that there are a multitude of ways their lives and careers can be affected if they show too much interest in activism.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

My Japanese acqaintance made an offhand remark about the government during a round of golf and was flying Deportation Airlines within 24 hours.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Singapore is clean? To a tourist maybe. There are many zones and districts where drugs, sex, gambling are rampant. Just because they have tough laws doesn't mean Singapore is "clean". Superficial clean like Japan means nothing when you dig a little deeper.

Singapore is probably one of the biggest illegal smuggling port in the world. You can't imagine the filth that gets through the Malacca Strait.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

"former British colonies"

There sure is a bunch of those.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And Singapore will have soon to obey the OECD banking rules too!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I love Singapore its a "FINE" place...

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It remains a fact that the government of Singapore uses a variety of methods to stop demonstrations occurring

From the New York Times of 2012: "As Singapore Loosens Its Grip, Residents Lose Fear to Challenge Authority"

"Those accustomed to thinking of this booming city-state as a bastion of apolitical strivers and shopaholics might be stunned by the burst of civic activism sweeping this crowded flyspeck of an island."

The full story here: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/world/asia/activism-grows-as-singapore-loosens-restrictions.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Singapore is a pretty active police state,

I've been to Singapore a number of times and have never seen a cop.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

They still have those silly laws against homosexuals living there, and speaking to donkeys in Chinese?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I'm with Serrano

I generally try to avoid negative posts but the government of Singapore is facism with a human face. If the people there are happy with that then more power to them (well less actually but you catch my drift).

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Still you have to wonder about a place that tries to present a modern, international image to the world, and yet can't handle the idea of 100 people engaging in peaceful demonstrations, either by its own citizens, or by foreign residents.

"They" can handle it just fine. they'd just rather not. Unlike the feeble-minded governments of western nations Singapore considers the needs of all its citizens not merely those which moan the loudest. In so doing they have come to the very reasonable and agreeable decision that street protests are a hazard and an annoyance for 99% of citizens.

This is why Singapore is and long has been a laughing stock.

Right ... real laughingstock. Talk about clueless.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Singapore is a police state well hidden by a corporate state. If you ever see the real leaders of that country interviewed, they are clearly willing and able to crush any opposition to their positions.

I would never live there, have been offered work there several times, but prefer Japan. Anyway the place is hot as hell 12 months a year, and unless your ideal life is being bored in a tiny country, there is not a hell of a lot to do there.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

People who love Singapore, must be kind of masochistic , who else would like to be controlled to that degree? Even the internet is censored!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I've been to Singapore a number of times and have never seen a cop.

Clearly you're not too familiar with the meaning of the term police state.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

hindingout:

In so doing they have come to the very reasonable and agreeable decision that street protests are a hazard and an annoyance for 99% of citizens.

Freedom of speech - and extensively democracy - is also an inconvenient truth for some people and governments. Not everyone has the chance to be born as a wealthy man!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It is amazing to read that some of the people criticizing Singapore do that because they miss chaos and filth where they come from. Imagine someone missing his democratic rights to throw chewing gum in the street.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

None the less, there still isn't much to do in Singapore. And I remember my heart always skipping a beat when I saw so many people jaywalking over there, I easily thought that would be illegal.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Singapore only looks clean at certain areas. When I was working there, I took the bus to many different areas on my own and have found that some are quite dirty. My wife who only speak English/French found that their English is hard to understand. Never mind that. It is a pretty place, tourist areas, yes, but I have found it quite boring. Though, I still like to eat the Pepper Crab.

Anyway, it is just common sense to obey the local laws.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When in Rome....it's their country, after all.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@JeffLeeMay.

"I've been to Singapore a number of times and have never seen a cop."

Perhaps, but you can be sure more than one cop has seen you....

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Perhaps, but you can be sure more than one cop has seen you....

My expat friends living in Singapore in the 90s used to smoke pot on the streets while outside the busiest clubs and bars and never had any trouble. This always baffled me.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I would like to point out that there was a bigger demonstration 3 days earlier where the foreigners got off with a warning. But when you deliberately break the law a second time in three days, yeah, I can understand them being subject to reasonable penalties.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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