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South Korea publicly orders some doctors who walked off the job back to work

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The doctors should get lots of English under their belt and move to Canada and the United States where there is a huge shortage of doctors, and they would get hired on with great salaries and never have to about being a contract worker.

There is a shortage of doctors in the US because the cost of medical school is so high leaving med students with the equivalent of a mortgage to pay off (which in turn often makes it impossible for them to qualify for a home loan), low wages, long hours for new doctors and ridiculous patient loads. Few doctors are starting a new private practice because insurance reimbursements are so low and they have to have a staff of coders to fight over payments with the coders at the insurance companies who are forever trying to code treatments with lower paying codes to save them money. Being a doctor in the US with the current system of big insurance companies making the payments has become too difficult for many to want to deal with.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You know, if Japan was smart, they'd poach these doctors ( esp the trainees) to address the shortage in Japan.

Yeah but in what language would these doctors communicate with the rest of their Japanese staff and patients?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The doctors should get lots of English under their belt and move to Canada and the United States where there is a huge shortage of doctors, and they would get hired on with great salaries and never have to about being a contract worker.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Go back to work, but do a slow down. "They pretend to pay us, we pretend to work." Blocks the system. Are they gonna bring police and military inside hospitals?

And I'm all for less hours, but they should be salaried, not wage or per patient. Should have enough doctors and short enough hours so that they get enough time for family, leisure, and sleep (work = 6 hours, family = 5 hours, leisure = 5 hours, sleep = 8 hours).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Mike Oxlong: "A doctor trained in Asia may find practicing in the US a lot of hoops to jump through."

As opposed to what... a foreign doctor practicing in Japan?? Heck, even Japanese doctors have to jump through hoops to get even the smallest things done, which is why they fell so far behind, so fast, with Covid. Doctors had to fax their hanko stamps before authorizing any kind of treatment, etc.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

It sounds like South started to move towards North. Doctors walkout also don’t seem to be justified. If the government wants to increase the number of doctors, it’s not the right reason to walkout.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The South Korean government is starting to sound like Russia's or Iran's.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

A doctor trained in Asia may find practicing in the US a lot of hoops to jump through. I asked ChatGPT4 Turbo:

The process for a foreign-trained doctor to practice medicine in the United States is not as straightforward as transferring a license from one country to another. A medical license is not directly transferable from Japan to any U.S. state due to differences in medical education systems, licensing requirements, and legal frameworks governing medical practice.

A licensed medical doctor from Japan would typically need to take several steps to practice medicine in the U.S. These steps often include:

Verification of their medical degree through the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG).

Passing the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), which consists of three steps.

Completing a residency program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), regardless of previous experience.

Obtaining a state medical license in the state where they intend to practice, which involves meeting specific state requirements and may include additional examinations or assessments.

Each state has its own medical board with unique requirements, so the doctor would need to research and fulfill the specific criteria for the state in question. It's a rigorous and time-consuming process, but it is designed to ensure that all practicing physicians in the U.S. meet consistent standards of care and professional competence.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

> 3RENSHOToday  04:35 pm JST

"Why would Korean doctors want to go to Japan?"

Possibly, to gain international work experience...?

When they can go to English-speaking countries instead? I gues it's close by at least.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

EastmanToday  01:09 pm JST

ok and so what is reason for their protest?any word about that

i read that the Korean government wanted to increase the number of training places at medical university by another 2000 places. The docs argued that this would reduce the quality of doctors qualifying. ( I don’t agree with this assumption) it could be that the docs also want to keep their little fiefdoms. Some areas in Korea can’t to attract any doctors because they want to go to the big cities and some also just want to do private cosmetic work which is highly lucrative. The demographic also need more docs to take care of the elderly but since their health care system is also mostly private they have a financial reason to limit the numbers of new docs.

Ego Sum Lux MundiToday  01:55 pm JST

Junior docs going on strike too in the UK, the whole of clown world is falling apart at the seems as late-stage capitalist reality begins to bite.

The uk system is very different. Junior docs haven’t had a decent pay rise in a decade because of austerity (supposedly to cut the uk debt post Legman’s shock) (big fail there) Medical places had been cut, and the work that docs did was increased but some was moved down to registered nurses.(good move according to RNs) but it adds more pressure to the nursing staff who can’t do the fundamental nursing care. So a new class of nurse was introduced under the P2000 scheme. This pushed work from RNs down to untrained staff,albeit with some new training). The UK however increased its recruitment from asia, Africa and the EU as the cheapest way to fill those posts and cut training places. Hope that explains some of the history.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

"Why would Korean doctors want to go to Japan?"

Possibly, to gain international work experience...?

2 ( +8 / -6 )

WesleyToday  02:46 pm JST

You know, if Japan was smart, they'd poach these doctors ( esp the trainees) to address the shortage in

Japan.

> Why would Korean doctors want to go to Japan?

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

You know, if Japan was smart, they'd poach these doctors ( esp the trainees) to address the shortage in Japan.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Junior docs going on strike too in the UK, the whole of clown world is falling apart at the seems as late-stage capitalist reality begins to bite.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

They work at university and national hospitals, which are government funded. They are kept as contract employees earning far less than full-time permanent staff. Then when they finish internship or residency they are not hired as full-time permanent staff, but kept as contract labor. Stuck permanently as gig workers. If they admit more students to medical schools, the trainees now will face getting even fewer hours per week/month, and earning even less as slave labor.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

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