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'The protester' named Time's person of year

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If you hit the streets in one of NATO's enemies you're a protester who deserves freedom and rights.

If you hit the streets within a NATO country, you'll be branded a rampaging rioter and you'll face black booted storm troopers who gleefully pepper-spray you like bug and smash your head in with a baton.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Which country was this 'arab' protesting in..

2 ( +2 / -0 )

so glad thats not a picture of a hippy on wallstreet!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

NeverSubmit. How very true.

I do agree with "Time" in their selection of the protester. We are on a ride straight into the abyss if we do nothing. It is time for all of us to do what we can to call for positive change. Everything depends upon it and it is time we started taking the matter seriously and get involved.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

How about the guy in Tunisia who set himself on fire in protest of repression by a brutal dictatorship? Compare that with predominately young white "students" hanging out in public parks with their $5,000 Macs and $400 smart phones protesting that the government should pay off the debt they incurred by going to an expensive private university instead of a cheaper public college. Including Occupy Wall Street with those protesting against dictatorships in the Middle East is a joke. TIME magazine has been clueless for decades now.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

How about the guy in Tunisia who set himself on fire in protest of repression by a brutal dictatorship?

been done before...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

TIME has been relevent since when? And now that the protester has officially become the person of 2011, can we move on now? The occupy movement is all about self-entitlement. Would we see those spoiled white kids, crazy homeless, and members uprise like in Syria, Libiya, or Egypt. Yeah right. Awards are really silly.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Arab spring has been amazing. Dictators gone. Sharia Law enacted. Omedetou.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I saw the cover and I asked myself something: Who is more courageous ?

Is it the young woman risking her very life protesting after dark on the already dangerous streets of Cairo, in Mubarak's Egypt; or is it the young suburban twenty six year old (whose university all but forced him/ her to take on sixty thousand dollars in debt just to get a degree) who has to brave the humiliation (oppression, many would say!) of moving back to their parents' home after university?And let's not forget that the latter was protesting sometimes for hours each day on the mean streets of places like Boston, Portland and San Francisco against the murderous brokers and finance wizards who work in those skyscrapers on Wall Street.

In the end I realized that it was a toss-up.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Speaking about protestors and dictators this movie is funny http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYplvwBvGA4

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm sure the choice from Japan would have been Steve Jobs (since AKB48 and Nadeshiko Japan were never in the running). He seems to have quite a following here.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Steve Jobs should have named person of the year in my opinion.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Admiral McRaven gets my vote.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Interesting choice.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Person_of_the_Year

Person of the Year (formerly Man of the Year) is an annual issue of the United States news magazine Time that features and profiles a person, couple, group, idea, place, or machine that "for better or for worse, ... has done the most to influence the events of the year."

It is not a designation of honor nor condemnation. It is just about who/what/how made the most significant news of the year. Time magazine points out those such as Adolf Hitler in 1938, and Joseph Stalin in 1939 and again in 1942, and the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979, have also been granted the title.

Good or bad doesn't matter into this. The protestors in the Middle East, in Wall Street, etc. Who's more courageous, who's right, who's wrong......... Does. Not. Matter.

They made the most news - that's all that matters.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Interesting choice.

But it's a year late.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Read the article. Time mentions every large protest movement in the last thirty years........except The Tea Party protesters. I'd say that's called discrimination in a nutshell.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Apologies, Article does mention the Tea party movement on page 2 of the article.

In the U.S., the Obama campaign was in part a feel-good protest movement that galvanized young people, and then its shocking success and the Wall Street bailout produced an angry and shockingly successful populist protest movement in the Tea Party, which has far outlasted its expected shelf life.

I stand corrected.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Sailwind "I stand corrected"

Thanks for admitting that and quoting the article. It is rare to see anyone do that and it speaks well of you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"The protester"

Better than "You" in 2006.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Aside from the Time article, if you think there is discrimination, maybe the TEA Party are looked down on for mostly caring about a single issue. They want lower taxes, right? TEA=Taxed Enough Already. What's the other side of that coin? How much of their own entitlements and security are they willing to give up to drive taxes ever lower?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Arabs are actually accomplishing something, so I would recognize that. The "Occupy" movement can barely organize cleaning up after themselves. Big difference.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'd say that's called discrimination in a nutshell.

It would be a misinformed charge of discrimination. (As you correctly pointed out later.)

It is rare to see anyone do that and it speaks well of you.

Well, it comes amid a larger allegation that Time and other media outlets lean left by -- as the accusations go -- discriminating against the conservative side.

The Tea Party is well worth a mention, but, in spirit and commitment, the OWSers bear much closer resemblance to the early American troops who braved the winter at Valley Forge.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You have to worry that ordinary Americans gonna link OWSers with the Muslim Brotherhood.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

the OWSers bear much closer resemblance to the early American troops who braved the winter at Valley Forge.

Those troops wanted their student loans payed off for free also? Who'd a guessed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Those troops wanted their student loans payed off for free also? Who'd a guessed.

Even a simp could see that throwing off indebtedness to Great Britain was just as much a legitimate end of the struggle. But the point was made of a clear comparison in terms of the level of commitment and spirit, which makes the Tea Party look like more of a tailgate party at a sporting event: yell for a couple of hours with Glenn Beck and then go home and "occupy" their L-Z-Boys.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

But the point was made of a clear comparison in terms of the level of commitment and spirit,

I guess that is why The Tea Party took as its inspiration the actual Boston Tea Party protests that sparked the Revolutionary war for our independence and many Tea Protesters actually wear Revolutionary garb in their legally permitted protests and the Occupy movement is inspired by hatred for Wall street and breaking the law in setting up squatter camps.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@sailwind

many Tea Protesters actually wear Revolutionary garb in their legally permitted protests....

Ha! I hope you appreciate the irony here.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@sailwind

many Tea Protesters actually wear Revolutionary garb in their legally permitted protests....

Ha! I hope you appreciate the irony here.

I do. Actually going to the trouble of obtaining permits to use public property to stage a protest does tend to stop the police from arresting you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually going to the trouble of obtaining permits to use public property to stage a protest does tend to stop the police from arresting you

Hardly "revolutionary", though, is it?

.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hardly "revolutionary", though, is it?

Agreed, I was always amazed the media and the democrats always tried to portray the Tea party protests as filled with violent extremists while they consider the OWS's as peaceable critters.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I guess that is why The Tea Party took as its inspiration the actual Boston Tea Party protests

Only within the warped minds of the duped. The original tea partier's stormed and occupied a corporate trade ship -- throwing its goods overboard. And they didn't ask for permission to do it.

the democrats always tried to portray the Tea party protests as filled with violent extremists

A lie. The Tea Party is filled with a lot of angry and hate-filled, and essentially lazy, people, typified by the ignorant slogan: Keep your government hands off of my Medicare. That doesn't mean that many don't relish the concept of violence, especially in rhetoric and symbols. Relatively few, however, would be willing to pay the price demanded by violent extremism.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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