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Thousands of guns handed in under Australian amnesty program

41 Comments
By WILLIAM WEST

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four SKS assault rifles

Sigh....SKS are not assault rifles, they are semi-automatic only rifles.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

Nice to see happening, sadly the biggest country with a gun problem won't follow, no matter how many get killed in mass shootings.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

This is how a civilized country comes together for the public good. But then again $280,000 and 14 years jail is quite an incentive too

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Australia proves it is a progressive nation, unlike others we know.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Good on Australia!

4 ( +8 / -4 )

In a society where everyone is politically equal and free, we cannot allow certain parts of society special privileges. The moment that happens, society is no longer truly equal. You end up becoming a sheep, under the protection of sheep dogs. Special privileges are a form of power over others who don't share them, and such power corrupts. An armed policeman is more likely to be aggressive or abusive to those he considers weaker than himself. I know the feeling, I have felt it myself. An old saying about carrying a gun is that it makes you anyone's equal. But if you are the only one holding a gun, everyone else is of little account.

In a true democracy, the people are the final authority, not the police or politicians. But when police and politicians enjoy privileges which the people cannot share, namely, the right to possess the means to exercise force, then the police and politicians become the final authority, because they have the means to enforce it.

But go ahead and give up your rights and your equality. A serf may not be well fed or well housed, but he is safe enough, he has nothing left worth stealing.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

But go ahead and give up your rights and your equality

In Australia - and most civilised nations - no-one has a right to own firearms. And long may that be the case. Just a glance of the gun murder stats in places like the UK, Australia and Japan versus certain dangerous, gun-toting nations will tell the story....

9 ( +14 / -5 )

I didn't know there were so much gun in Australia... Good initiative anyway !

But go ahead and give up your rights and your equality.

Also, in other countries, the police is held accountable for using their weapon. So it's not a right but a responsibility.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

The amnesty runs from July 1 until September 30, allowing people to hand in unregistered or unwanted firearms with no questions asked. Outside that period people face fines of up to Aus$280,000 (U.S.$222,000) or 14 years' jail.

Spot on. Oz has always been pretty good at giving ppl the opportunity to come clean "no questions asked" yet be ultra-strict with those who don't want to listen.

AFP recently caught a few guys trying to smuggle Glocks (pistols) into the country. The blokes were buying glocks parts online (from Germany if I remember well) and all accessories were mailed to a small local post office (Sydney's south) whose owner was part of the syndicate.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Very good initiative. Another way to restrict gun usage is to strictly control the sale / purchase of ammunition.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

The amnesty runs from July 1 until September 30, allowing people to hand in unregistered or unwanted firearms with no questions asked. Outside that period people face fines of up to Aus$280,000 (U.S.$222,000) or 14 years' jail.

A law that makes a heck lot of sense, and it seems, it is also very efficient for a change... Many people build one or bought one "just for thrills", but never actually intended anything else illegal. Allowing them to clean up "no questions asked" is the way to do it. US could learn a bit or two from this.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

SANGETSU03 Did u actually read the whole article? Those guns handed in are "illicit weapons". U can still buy and own guns that are legal in Australia. But I guess u are those who believe I can own whatever weapons I like and use them to shot whoever I want kind of person.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A nice shot of common sense for the day.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

But go ahead and give up your rights and your equality

Spoken like a true, we all know where from, but misguided none the less. Owning a firearm is not a "right"

Somewhere along the line people lost track of the meaning of the right and now feel they have the right to force their opinions on the rest of the world.

With "rights" come responsibilities, not idiots and lunatics, running around whacking people off because their "rights" were infringed upon!

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Fantastic ! I can just see all the criminals lining up to hand in their weapons too.

Wake up ya Lemmings !

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

Australia proves it is a progressive nation, unlike others we know.

Good for them, glad, I'm not in that country. They have their laws and I respect that. Love my guns and my second amendment and if people think we are a backward country because of it, I can live with that proudly.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

In a true democracy, the people are the final authority, not the police or politicians. But when police and politicians enjoy privileges which the people cannot share, namely, the right to possess the means to exercise force, then the police and politicians become the final authority, because they have the means to enforce it.

Why should the people have the means to exercise force? That's what security forces are for.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Looks like the gun nutters here are in a bit of a sulky moan.

I'm sure they'll cheer themselves up with fantasies of waging a patriotic guerilla war against a despotic government.

Kawaii.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Looks like the gun nutters here are in a bit of a sulky moan. 

I think most of us are fine, we're not Australian, so nothing to moan about. We as Americans have our second amendment.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Seeing the comments of gun defenders, they seem to think that firearms are forbidden in other countries. Do they realize that's not the case ?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I think most of us are fine, we're not Australian, so nothing to moan about. We as Americans have our second amendment.

Yes, and sensible people are admiring the common sense of Australia. Perhaps the idea that countries with smaller populations care more about their citizens not being killed has some truth in it.

What a fine country. Has always been high on my list as a place to retire to. Good weather, good people and a reluctance to accept the idea of people being shot as a result of a sick vice.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

We as Americans have our second amendment.

Which has been perverted beyond belief. You are no safer with your guns, and in fact are going to be more prone to being shot, or YOU shoot someone because you have them.

You just like to live in your cocoon and fail to realize that you and other gun owners are just as much a part of the problem as the solution as well.

http://www.romans322.com/daily-death-rate-statistics.php

No 23 on the list for this year, but still nearing 7,000 deaths this year alone! But you really don't care, you have your "rights" but you care little for the deaths.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

But Bass, it's not even about abolishing the 2nd amendment per se but simply a better control of all guns already in circulation in the us. That's what the aussies are doing here i.e "allowing people to hand in unregistered or unwanted firearms".

Staunch supporters of the 2nd amendment often think 'better control' or restrictions means 'total ban', it doesn't. Perso I fully respect your 2nd amendment but things have changed since the late 18th century, not only guns themselves but also ppl using them. Nothing disrespectful in saying the 2nd amendment may need/ does need some tweaking.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@goldorak

A very lucid and reasonable post. Unfortunately, people in love with a siege mentality of liberals coming for their beloved firearms aren't listening to a reasonable and lucid approach.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Good for Australians that want to turn in their firearms.

BTW, many US states, counties, cities have similar "amnesty programs" and "gun buyback" programs from time to time.

http://www.cbs46.com/story/31927980/gun-buyback-program-aims-to-remove-thousands-of-guns-from-streets and https://patch.com/georgia/cascade/fulton-county-hosts-gun-buy-back-event-thursday This sort of thing is common in every state that I've lived in.

UK got 40K weapons turned in in one of their amnesty programs.

Voluntary programs to hand over unwanted firearms is a good thing.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

sangetsu03

I am nigatsu03.

In a true democracy, the people are the final authority, not the police or politicians. But when police and politicians enjoy privileges which the people cannot share, namely, the right to possess the means to exercise force, then the police and politicians become the final authority, because they have the means to enforce it.

But go ahead and give up your rights and your equality. A serf may not be well fed or well housed, but he is safe enough, he has nothing left worth stealing.

I am Australian. I find your perception of the police and politicians to be paranoid. Police in Australia are members of the community doing a job, and are perceived that way by the vast majority of the population. They tend to be friendly, personable people, in my experience. Members of the community who do a job. I know several. I have never, ever been intimidated by, or scared of a policeman in Australia. I have never seen a policeman pull a weapon, or indeed heard any anecdotes to the same effect. They have them, but when I am in Australia I don't for one minute fear that they might draw their weapon. Much like in Japan.

A politician in Australia is democratically elected by the people, all of whom have to vote. Because it is a democracy. They work for the people, their constituents, who elected them to represent them in the parliament. This bizarre notion that they somehow have the right to exercise force is quite delusional paranoia. It's spectacularly divorced from reality.

As an Australian, I see one of my primary and precious rights as being safe on my streets, and in my house, without a fear that a delusional, paranoid nutter might be carrying a gun. In fact, guns NEVER, EVER factor into my thinking on a day-to-day basis AT ALL, for any reason when I'm in Australia. It's a completely foreign concept.

I know, that virtually everyone I come across are in exactly the same headspace as me, and to me, those are my rights at play, and a wonderful manifestation of equality and social and communal respect for each other. It's a communal rejection of the tools of killing, and the fear and paranoia they culture.

That's true liberation.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Fantastic ! I can just see all the criminals lining up to hand in their weapons too.

Wake up ya Lemmings !

Some so-called authorities and police are criminals, too.

Prais the Lord and pass the ammunition...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

good for Australia, the terrorists and gangs appreciate unarmed citizens to kill.

As do some police and obviously not just in Australia.

Tooled up authorities and citizens the world over are what the west condemns. But apparently not in their own countries.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Over to you, US of A! What are you waiting for?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Austrailian gun registration and then using the registration list to confiscate these weapons at a latter date is driving American politics. Americans worry the same thing will happen. What is legal today is illegal tomorrow. Americans see the police showing up to take their weapons.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@yuriotani so when did Australia confiscate weapons from people who registered their guns and hold valid licences to carry them...So please tell me what was legal in Australia today and is illegal tommorow?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

After the massacre of 96 entire series of weapons became illegal and all the police had to do was use the registration lists to confiscate them. The people of Austrailia were told at the time of registration, this would never happen. Trust us!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

As a Beikokujin, I've enjoyed shooting for many years, also hunting and eating what I kill. My hunting style is very old fashioned, mostly by myself on public lands legally taking, registering any game I kill, then preparing it for the table. Very organic meat that is also very healthy food that is all natural. We absolutely never waste wild game. I don't know if there is hunting in Australia. But it is also enjoyable to shoot at proper shooting ranges.

I've also seen a few Japanese hunting in Japan, and used to live near a skeet range in Nagano Ken, where people would come and enjoy using their shotguns. So I do love guns and shooting. Australia, Japan, etc. is a very different makeup than America. It certainly does seem true that in the USA, criminals will absolutely ALWAYS have guns.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Everyday at least one shooting incident has happened in Western suburb of Sydney. It was drug related crime committing by Middle Eastern gang. The criminals never give up their weapons.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@GyGene.....I am in your corner with what you wrote. My problem with guns in one certain country, is the belief that people need them for protection, nada, nada,nada.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yuri

After the massacre of 96 entire series of weapons became illegal and all the police had to do was use the registration lists to confiscate them.

Well, the police work for the State Governments, who agreed to a National Firearms Agreement, and banned semi-automatic rifles and all semi-automatic and pump-action shotguns. THEN, you had licensing and ownership laws introduced. It's also important to note that the Federal Government bought the guns off the owners, as per the Australian Constitution. That scheme lasted a year, and 1 million weapons were handed in voluntarily at that time.

 The people of Austrailia were told at the time of registration, this would never happen. Trust us!

I don't remember that. Do you have sources?

GyGene

I don't know if there is hunting in Australia

The answer is yes Gene. Many farmers still own guns I believe. As a kid I used to go shooting with Farmer's sons who were friends of mine, and Kangaroo Jerky is just about as good as it gets.

Kangaroo stew however, is an entirely different kettle of fish. Or Kangaroo.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

By the way, staunch defenders of their right to carry a killing machine much appreciate the work of this crowd:

http://www.shootersfishersandfarmers.org.au

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Tamarama

Those people aren't carrying killing machines any more than indigenous peoples are when they're carrying bows and arrows. They're hunting. Can you explain why you're willing to group those law abiding citizens to whom you provided a link together with criminals?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The U.K., for example, has seen it's homicide rate increase since it banned its citizens from owning guns.

The Firearms (Amendment) Act, which effectively banned private possession of handguns almost completely, was passed in 1997. Following that the murder rate did spike, but then quickly fell back to slightly less than pre-ban levels. Even at its peak, the murder rate was way, way below the US, with all those legal guns in the hands of responsible law-abiding gun-owners, stopping all the crime.

‎webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20160109023926/http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/dcp171776_352260.pdf

Those people aren't carrying killing machines any more than indigenous peoples are when they're carrying bows and arrows.

You mean yes, they are carrying killing machines. What do you think bows and arrows are used for, crocheting?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

But Bass, it's not even about abolishing the 2nd amendment per se but simply a better control of all guns already in circulation in the us.

For the States that don't have stronger gun control, I don't disagree, but most States do have very stringent gun laws. The main problem is getting the stolen guns and unregistered guns out of circulation and out of the hands of the gangs and criminals.

Law abiding citizens shouldn't have to be forced to turn over guns if they are hunters (as I am) or live on a farm or for security or safety reasons.

That's what the aussies are doing here i.e "allowing people to hand in unregistered or unwanted firearms".*

I don't think gangs or criminals will willfully turn in their firearms. They need to be forced to do so.

Staunch supporters of the 2nd amendment often think 'better control' or restrictions means 'total ban', it doesn't.

I agree with you, I think that is not an unreasonable statement.

Perso I fully respect your 2nd amendment but things have changed since the late 18th century, not only guns themselves but also ppl using them. Nothing disrespectful in saying the 2nd amendment may need/ does need some tweaking.

I agree 100%

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

6000 guns handed in by law-abiding citizens. The irony is that not one criminal turned in a gun, so Australia is actually less safe as a result of this stupid stunt. Gun control laws won't work once you've reached a level of saturation like the United States and Australia. Japan never had a gun culture, so it's very easy to make sure only the Yakuza and a few foreign crime syndicates have guns, but it's too late to do away with guns in many Western nations and achieve that level of "thoroughness".

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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