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Thousands rally in Ireland after woman denied abortion dies

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Nice going stupid, hypocritical church! And this is from a Mexican that has lived under at least 99% Catholics, which is most of my family and friends, but come on, deny the poor woman an emergency abortion and she and her baby both die?? For shame!! RIP both mother and baby

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Ugly. You didn't want to kill the baby, so you killed the mother and the baby died anyway. If she had lived, she could have had another baby. And now...? Nothing "pro life" about this.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is what happens when you allow the purveyors of superstitious claptrap to tell others what they can and cannot do.

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"Nice going stupid, hypocritical church!"

It wasn't the church, but the medical professionals who refused to take prompt medical measures to protect this woman's life while she was experiencing a drawn out miscarriage. Instead, they waited until it was too late, because "there was still a fetal heartbeat".

Medical staff should not have to worry about religion-based laws when making medical decisions. They should be consulting patients and best medical practices, rather than priests and lawyers when making treatment decisions.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Exactly why I renounced my Catholic beliefs and turned atheist.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Exactly why I renounced my Catholic beliefs and turned atheist.

Really? This very reason in the last month has made you give up your faith? Very sudden I think.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Oh no I gave up Catholicism some time ago due to their very narrow minded views on homosexuality (I've got a good few gay friends and some family members) and I can't stand how they look down on it as some sort of sin, views on abortion/contraception and without forgetting trying to hide up cases of pedophilia.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I've got a good understanding on Roman Catholics from my Irish/Finn background.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I am pro Life, and against abortion in general, except in circumstances where the life of the mother is at risk. This poor lady was a dentist, and requested three times to have the baby removed. Quite clearly, she should have been granted her request. I am utterly appalled at the attitude of the hospital staff, and at their comment that "this is a Catholic country." That was a racist comment, apart from anything else. The Republic of Ireland needs to get its abortion laws sorted out. The people in that hospital who refused this woman an abortion should be fired. Ireland is no longer a Catholic country. Most people living in the Iriish Republic are disillusioned with the Catholic Church because of the cover up about paedophile priests and nuns. The prevalent attitude within the Catholic Church is hypocritical. How can they condemn abortion and yet protect the paedophiles within their ranks?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Oh no I gave up Catholicism some time ago

Ok. Just that you said "Exactly why I renounced my Catholic beliefs" which as I read it, meant that this business with abortion in Ireland triggered your leaving of the church.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just to clarify,

In 1992, when challenged in the “X-case” involving a 14-year-old rape victim, the Supreme Court ruled that abortion was permitted when the woman’s life was at risk, including from suicide.

So this was a failure of the medical professionals involved in this case, not a case of a priest standing over the doctors shoulder saying, "Don't you do it."

Exactly why I renounced my Catholic beliefs and turned atheist.

Lets clarify something here. You renounced your Catholic faith because of the practices of the Catholic Church, that makes sense. You became an atheist because you don't believe in a higher power. Those two decisions are entirely separate. If you disliked the Church you could have gone to a different one, even a different religion if you had some belief in a higher power. If you really did lose faith in a higher power because of the actions of a few individuals I pity you. It would be like me abandoning all education because a teacher molested a student.

The prevalent attitude within the Catholic Church is hypocritical. How can they condemn abortion and yet protect the paedophiles within their ranks?

I try to take people on a case by case basis, judging each person on their individual merits. Kind of like how I judge the medical practitioner that denied this woman her treatment should probably be fired because while I understand his reservations he had an ethical obligation that he knew would interfere with his moral sensibilities. If he could not resolve that conflict than he shouldn't practice medicine. But what do I know, I'm just a homophobic, woman hating, pedophile supporting, backwards Catholic. Glad you're staggering insight was able to put me in my place.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pro-"life" nuts. Manslaughter charges - at the very least - should be brought if this is true.

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" I have a problem with them being condescending."

It is a trait of some atheists I'll accord you the Q. To be honest in my twenties I firmly considered myself one and did my fair share of being impolite to people of faith. These days in my early thirties, I find it hard to believe in nothing - even though all I believe in is atoms. I still think organised religions are a crock, but I no longer have a disparaging view of people that believe in a higher power so long as they don't pester me - or worse like the topic - cause others pain, misery or even death.

Religion should be removed totally from law-making and governance and left to be a private matter.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

These days in my early thirties, I find it hard to believe in nothing - even though all I believe in is atoms.

I liked Einsteins perspective, instead of wasting time debating whether or not a higher power was the source of creation in the universe he'd ponder whether such a being would even have a choice in the matter.

Religion should be removed totally from law-making and governance and left to be a private matter.

That's a slightly tougher one. For myself and others my religion serves as a guiding influence as to what I see as right and wrong, were I an elected official those guidelines would still act as a primary pillar which helps determine how I perceive things and solve problems. I cannot switch off my religion no more than an atheist can switch off their individual moral codes that they've developed following the norms of the societies they are born into.

Some people think that old rituals like swearing on a bible are dated and have no place in modern secular society. I'll be the first to tell you its not. I'm not a very good Catholic; I'm cool with gays, I advocate contraception, I will oggle my neighbors hot wife with reckless abandon, and I will straight up lie to a mans face without a seconds hesitation but I'm really and truly powerless if some leave it to Beaver boy-scout acts like a 3rd grader and gets me to swear to God. I'm a pretty modern man for all intents and purposes but I'm superstitious as all get out and hubris scares the jerk right out of me. The Greeks got one thing right, hubris begets nemesis and that's all kinds of cosmic no-thank-you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I don't understand why people in Ireland are tolerating this.

In Northern Ireland, women can get abortions for medical reasons only and are forced to travel to mainland Britain if they want to abort a child for other reasons. This situation is grotesque when you consider that N.I. is still officially part of the UK where abortion "on-demand" is legal. The second problem in N.I. is that there are no clear guidelines on medical abortions, putting medical professionals in an impossible situation. Several attempts to define guidelines were blocked by both protestant and catholic institutions and the political parties affiliated with them.

In Eire they have no abortion on demand, again hypocrisy as everyone knows huge numbers of women travel to England to have abortions. Their criteria for performing medical abortions is even less defined than in Northern Ireland, which is again a nightmare for everyone involved.

This lady's baby had zero chance of survival, the medical staff knew that. Aborting the baby would have prevented her death, the "we're a catholic country" comment sounds like thinly veiled racism against an Indian lady. I hope her death wasn't in vain in the sense that it will prompt people to DEMAND a change in the law.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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