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Tornado kills multiple people in Iowa as powerful storms again tear through Midwest

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By HANNAH FINGERHUT, SCOTT McFETRIDGE and MARGERY A. BECK

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Sympathies to all those affected. Large arts of Iowa are in an area called "Tornado Alley" where devastating tornadoes have long touched down. Now the area is said to be expanding; if so, and if storms are forecast to be even more intense: what are the powers that are going to do to help make life there less dangerous for residents?Because Tornado Alley is also in the 'Bible Belt', maybe just continue to offer thoughts and prayers.

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20230616-how-tornado-alley-is-changing

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“It was just a few weeks ago that tornadoes hit several other Iowa communities, and it’s hard to believe that it’s happened again,” she said in a statement.

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If you live in a tornado zone, you will get tornadoes.

Best thing the USA goverment can do, is get every house a purpose built tornado shelter

AND / OR

Build public tornado shelters.

That way chances of surviving increases.

A underground basement is only as good as the house built above it and how water drains in the area.

If the house is riped away, the basement is left open to the elements.

If the area floods as rain falls faster then it flows away, The basement can be flooded.

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residents to the west in Omaha, Nebraska, awoke to sirens blaring and widespread power outages as torrential rain, high winds and large hail pummeled the area. The deluge flooded basements

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Basements are not totaly safe, but are better than nothing.

Tornado built shelters are a must in those areas.

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I grew up in this part of the world. You listen to the radio and the town/county has sirens wailing whenever there is high likelihood of tornadoes in the area. The whole family spent hours in the basement with a little radio passing the time. The family dog would shake from all the thunder. Tornado alley isn't really used anymore, since there are tornadoes almost everywhere east of the Rockies from lower Texas to upper NY state. Places full of mountains tend not to have so many, but they still happen.

The tornadoes that did the most damage to my family was in Fairfax, VA and in Marietta, GA - both east coast states. None hit our homes in ND, SD, NE, TX. In Fairfax, the houses across the street and next door were wiped from Earth. Nobody was killed. We pulled the families out from the rubble. The local high school was destroyed.

In Marietta, the tornado mostly hit commercial areas, then bounced over our home (we lived in a valley) to do damage at the next hill peak about 1 km away.

People in Iowa are taught how to handle tornadoes. Children have tornado drills just like fire drills at school. What they don't have are Earthquake or Tsunami drills. No need. Different parts of the world have different natural disasters. Just like people in Japan are used to Earthquakes and have learned to live with that danger, people in the eastern US have learned to live with tornadoes. Both types of disasters have methods of mitigation that the locals know.

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There's incredible stormchaser video on YouTube of the tornado hitting a wind turbine and absolutely shredding it. When you think about how large, strong, and heavy those turbines must be, and then consider that level of force impacting a town, it's a terrifying thing to consider.

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A tornado ripped through the backyard of my mom’s house flipped over a patio table breaking the glass and ripped the tv antenna off the roof, just last weekend (in Florida).

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A tornado ripped through the backyard of my mom’s house flipped over a patio table breaking the glass and ripped the tv antenna off the roof, just last weekend (in Florida).

Unfortunate. Thanks for sharing.

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