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Trump calls for boycott until Apple unlocks shooter's phone

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“It just occurred to me” would be his method of governing.

16 ( +20 / -4 )

"He has repeatedly urged people not to shop at Macy’s after the department store dropped his signature business clothing line because of comments he made insulting Mexicans. " - article

Boycott Trump.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

Dear Feds, I trust Apple way more than I trust you. Frankly, my privacy "Trumps" your Big Brotherness. But, keep chipping away. Who knows, you may be able to bug everybodys' house legally in a few years.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

Yeah smart move Trump. Boycott Apple... let`s see how that goes down. Regardless of opinion of Apple... they really need to be supported on this.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Aren't Facebook and Twitter on board with the authorities in an effort to red flag terrorists on-line? What's the big deal? Let's find out more about (lunatic) Tashfeen's agenda. Unlock that cell phone. . . It's called "Investigating."

-15 ( +4 / -19 )

Trump continues to rack up fails.

The privacy issue Apple cites is an issue that has long needed legal clarification. Trump's approach ignores the facts and goes for a false patriotism from the draft dodger.

Apple's point is privacy. After the NSA, Snowden and Wiki Americans should have the right to know if their phones can be hacked by Apple, the Government or thieves.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

I wouldn't boycott Apple, but Apple is dumb for doing this and I believe Apple will lose if this gets to the Supreme Court. We are talking about the FBI requesting to bypass their locked security feature on the iPhone 5C that they have in their possession from a DEAD jihadist, there are so many ways Apple can do this without compromising any open window to the public. The FBI could hand over the phone to Apple, have them unlock it and give them all the information that's on it. They said, they can't, but that's a bunch of horse**** because they've don it before...

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/feds-apple-unlocked-iphones-many-051200269.html;_ylt=AwrSbgaMqcdWyTAAinFXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEyOGRqY3NyBGNvbG8DZ3ExBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDQjExNzlfMQRzZWMDc2M-

Apple is taking a bigger stance on this issue because the previous issues weren't making worldwide news and in the spotlight, but this is something way, way bigger and now Apple is under the loop. While I support Apple and Am a huge loyal fan of their products, on this issue, they are dead wrong and should do ONCE again what they have always previously have done in the past to due their duty and help the FBI crack this case and find out what the dead terrorists knew and how to prevent and combat any possible future attacks, but once again, trying to understand liberal logic defies anything rational.

-16 ( +3 / -19 )

Rather than asking for legislative action through Congress, a judge agreed the FBI is proposing an unprecedented expanded use of the All Writs Act of 1789..

Republicans: the party of the 4th Amendment, strict construction, and judicial restraint.™

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Americans should have the right to know if their phones can be hacked by Apple, the Government or thieves.

I don't have anything to hide on my smartphone. I'm all for the whole Expectation of Privacy concept, but we're talking about "radical islam" here. What? Do the (lib) Apple Execs also not recognize "radical islam" either?

-17 ( +3 / -20 )

Apple hasn't unlocked iPhones in previous cases — it has extracted data that was accessible while they were still locked. The government wants Apple to weaken its security in this case which would enable the phone to be unlocked using brute force techniques. The danger is that once it is known for a fact that Apple possesses a software tool that would enable them to unlock this phone it becomes a precedent that the government can find a judge to approve any time it suits their agenda.

http://techcrunch.com/2016/02/18/no-apple-has-not-unlocked-70-iphones-for-law-enforcement/

12 ( +15 / -3 )

I'm all for bla bla bla, but.... = you aren't all for it.

It means you throw it away if it is inconvenient.

So, pretty please, continue to sing from roof tops how you and your stupid party think the 4th Amendment , Due Process, and checks and balances are inconvenient. 'Cause we;re talking about radical Islam. Oohhhhhh.

You said "radical"

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I and I probably many millions more will toss our iPhones in the bin if a back door system is ever "publicly" acknowledged.

(The government is asking, I suspect they will comply…but on the hush hush.)

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I'm sure the families of (lunatic) Tashfeen Malik's victims would want the FBI to get into her iPhone. And if it was a lunatic white man shooting up abortion clinics, all you hypocrites would be calling for lethal injection and his iPhone to be unlocked too.

Tashfeen deserves no 4th Ammendment. Any radical muslim in the US should closely monitored by the FBI.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

I store nothing of value (i.e. secret information) on my cell phone, who would and why. The US military and governmental agencies have access to your phone records, texts through the communication services as well as your web browsing sites visited so what else is there in your cell that is or should be a big secret and off limits for assisting in a crime investigation. I have owned Apple products and aside from them being "cute" they are no better than other products and I only had Apple products because they were mandatory issue from a previous employer. Show me a cat owner and I'll show you an Apple owner who leaves dirty dishes in the sink for days on end and has several episodes of gastrointestinal problems per year as well.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

See how the hysterical law and order crowd has no idea about American laws.

I'm sure the families of (lunatic) Tashfeen Malik's victims would want bla bla bla

Family members cannot wish away a relatives rights.

Tashfeen deserves no 4th Ammendment

Yes, she does. Everyone does. Don't matter if you are American, or not. That is the law.

Complete disregard for due process and the rule of law combined with nativist hysteria has a name:

This fascism, folks.

Yeah, I said it.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Apple should tell the government to go to hell and take responsibility for the garbage they let into our country in the first place, then maybe a civilized society wouldn't have to violate the rights of their own people. . . .

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

I and I probably many millions more will toss our iPhones in the bin if a back door system is ever "publicly" acknowledged.

Then you need to throw it in the bin, it's already there and for Cook to say they can't is an outrageous lie, they just don't want to comply because of the notoriety of this case and the attention it brings to Apple and its security. This is just stupid and Apple is prolonging the inevitable. They should and will eventually cave in to the demands of the FBI, this is just outrageous! We are talking about two dead radical jihadists for Pete's sake!

-11 ( +3 / -14 )

Yes, she does. Everyone does. Don't matter if you are American, or not.

What if you're a sleeper radical jihadist? You see! NOT everyone should be protected by the 4th. You need to plead the 5th.

Apple is wrong for failing to cooperate. Lokk @Hillary Clinton, she's cooperating.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

Trump is so busy appealing to base fears about foreign others, especially among poor white folks, he has missed an opportunity to slam Apple for stashing its profits in offshore tax havens. Tim Cook, in a letter to customers wrote:

We are challenging the FBI’s demands with the deepest respect for American democracy and a love of our country. We believe it would be in the best interest of everyone to step back and consider the implications.

Yet if he and Apple love their country so much, why don't they help pay their fair share to help improve its crumbling infrastructure and address the many socioeconomic problems.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Apple will lose millions in sales after they do it. And they will do it. Sure, the FBI will pay them whatever millions $ it costs to devolpe a work-around, and then Apple will need to build a replacement OS for everyone else using the hacked product. ...Until FBI demands a hack for the next one... and then It becomes a spiral down for Apple sales soon...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Wake up...the gub'ment of Amerika can hack into this singular phone... this is an excuse to unlock ALL of them.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

If the terrorists are going to use the technology available for their own deadly deeds, then it's good to make them squirm a little or think twice about using it.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

If the terrorists are going to use the technology available for their own deadly deeds, then it's good to make them squirm a little or think twice about using it.

Yeah, especially the ones with ISIS flag screensavers trying to get into the US. Or the ones like Tashfeen Malik.

The lib posters were quick to bash guns and how Tashfeen was able to get her hands on one prior to the terror attack in San Bernardino. But now they can't wear the shoe when the FBI is reasonably asking to unlock "1" terrorist's iPhone.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Apple will lose millions in sales after they do it. And they will do it. Sure, the FBI will pay them whatever millions $ it costs to devolpe a work-around, and then Apple will need to build a replacement OS for everyone else using the hacked product. ...Until FBI demands a hack for the next one... and then It becomes a spiral down for Apple sales soon...

Apple can request he phone and do it themselves and hand it back over to the Feds. There are ways that Apple can do this without alarming the public, but if people are so stupid to think that Apple helping the Feds will equal to a backdoor to letting anyone with simple ease bypass all their security features is a loon. This is something completely different and remember, the people are dead, so they really don't have to worry about their information being compromised. Apple should really be ashamed of themselves.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

Then you need to throw it in the bin, it's already there and for Cook to say they can't is an outrageous lie

I agree with you based on the absolutely nothing whatsoever anywhere to show that your comment has even an ounce of reality behind it.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Good luck with that. And besides, it's not just the phone unlocked they want, it's the method for unlocking phones, so that they can do it any time, to anyone. THAT is wrong.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Trump doesn't own shares of Apple, so he is OK with this.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"I have nothing to hide" has and never will be be a valid reason for illegally intruding into another persons private life.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I can't support Trump on this one, and I hope Apple is able to overcome challenges from the US government. The government is encroaching more and more into our lives, taking more rights and privileges for itself, while taking them away from us. As we try to make the country more and more safe, we end up being less and less free. As Jefferson said, "he who would give up an essential liberty for temporary safety deserves neither liberty nor safety".

5 ( +6 / -1 )

sangetsu03.

One if the reasons why I couldn't live in the states, another is that I had the election progress and how polarised the people are.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If the FBI and CIA, with all of its BILLIONS can not open a phone, then they are truly useless. Asking a company to do what they should be doing without any thought much less publicity is mind-boggling. Even more so now that famous hackers have offered their services for free, but they have mohawks and do not match FBI dress code, so can't HAVE THAT. The FBI are fools!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If the FBI and CIA, with all of its BILLIONS can not open a phone, then they are truly useless.

Not at all. It means that Apple has built an extremely secure system - particularly since it will wipe itself clean if too many mistakes are made.

Not everything is TV. In the real world, you can't just go beep-boop and the phone is unlocked with some special tool.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It's interesting that so many of the comments above are in favor of letting known terrorists have a leg up on law enforcement here. Does anybody remember the RICO laws? It gave the FBI the right to bug mafia hangouts and tap into the phone lines of mobsters like John Gotti (aka The Teflon Don). For the FBI to get permission required a high ranking judge's approval, but they were able to put a lot of Mafioso, like Gotti, away where they couldn't cause more harm to people.

If a terrorist has just murdered your child, wife, husband or whoever, wouldn't you want the authorities to put such scum away where they couldn't cause anymore harm to society?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Let's not bring Terrorists into the discussion.

And the question how would you feel if it happened to your loved ones is unanswerable unless it happened for real. No one can say what their real feelings will be.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It's interesting that so many of the comments above are in favor of letting known terrorists have a leg up on law enforcement here

Ridiculous. No one wants to give terrorists have a leg up on law enforcement, what we don't want is to sacrifice our own privacy and security. As has been said: "he who would give up an essential liberty for temporary safety deserves neither liberty nor safety".

2 ( +4 / -2 )

OK, Strangerland. How would you feel about opening the personal mail, like an envelope containing a letter, of a killer with blood on his/her hands? If it would help solve a murder and keep a killer off the streets, then why not? We're not talking about the mail of everybody here, just the worst of the worst.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Its one of Trump political fire works and big flashes.his circus show wont come to an end.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's interesting that so many of the comments above are in favor of letting known terrorists have a leg up on law enforcement here

It's more interesting that for everyday people, quite the opposite is true. Allowing the creation of a tool that potentially can be abused could be far worse. I recall people being extremely scathing of Sony for their failure to keep information secure... I don't recall if there were any legal penalties... but for the FBI to even consider asking Apple to do something which makes their systems less secure is ludicrous. There is also no guarantee that any of the information they may gather from this will be of any use anyway.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Is this what he is going to do if elected president? Make sweeping allegations against American businesses and call for boycotts? I don't care if you agree with his opinion, this is the behavior of a child.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

How would you feel about opening the personal mail, like an envelope containing a letter, of a killer with blood on his/her hands? If it would help solve a murder and keep a killer off the streets, then why not? We're not talking about the mail of everybody here, just the worst of the worst.

No I wouldn't mind if they peeled an apple that's wasn't an orange.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

No I wouldn't mind if they peeled an apple that's wasn't an orange.

But if someone near and dear to you was harmed by a known psychopath or terrorist, you are basically saying that you would not want the authorities to have the right to access the personal e-mails of the nut or nuts responsible.

I would want to know everything. As far as I'm concerned, anybody who's guilty of committing a brutal crime like in a terrorist attack, a hate crime actually, like what happened in San Bernardino last year, has fewer rights than my pet cat.

Again, it's not about everybody here, just the individual or individuals involved who have blood on their hands.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Apple is so darn expensive on my minimum wage salary anyway so I personally boycotted their stuff on my small budget long ago.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Again, it's not about everybody here, just the individual or individuals involved who have blood on their hands.

You're right... it's not about everybody. Hence the opposition to a plan that affects everybody... not just Apple users... everybody.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

But if someone near and dear to you was harmed by a known psychopath or terrorist, you are basically saying that you would not want the authorities to have the right to access the personal e-mails of the nut or nuts responsible.

No, what I'm saying is that if that access comes at the security risk of everyone else in the world who owns the same device, it's not worth it for them to get that access. I'll post it again: "he who would give up an essential liberty for temporary safety deserves neither liberty nor safety"

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Roger that. Dumped Macy's, dumped Starbucks, dumping and shorting Apple. Besides, everyone knows without Jobs its just not Apple anymore.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It would be easier to support Apple if they hadn't already caved to the Chinese.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

How have they "caved in to the Chinese"?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

"you are basically saying that you would not want the authorities to have the right to access the personal e-mails of the nut or nuts responsible." - comments

In this specific case? These murderers gave up any expectation of "privacy" when they killed fourteen. Whose ever chain of command these freaks acted under seems like a "hot pursuit" necessity and at the very leaste the only avenue to bring co-conspirators to justice.

The consensus isn't "they have rights!"

It isn't clear exactly. "Apple is resisting U.S. government demands," one assumes resisting duly empowered warrant.

(Wouldn't the Boston Marathon killer's emails, computers, cells ect. have already clearly established the power of Government to enforce warrant in these electronic media/devices?)

The problem is "how much of your device is yours, is the data your property if there's no expectation of privacy?" And, how much money does Apple have to pursue a likely Supreme Court docket in 2020 and is Apple trading lives for a "marketing scheme?"

Neither seems probable.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Get used to it if he gets elected America! Every morning on the White House balcony - the government policy for the day.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I'm boycotting Trump no matter what Apple does.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

LizzFEB. 20, 2016 - 09:16AM JST Apple hasn't unlocked iPhones in previous cases — it has extracted data that was accessible while they were still locked. The government wants Apple to weaken its security in this case which would enable the phone to be unlocked using brute force techniques. The danger is that once it is known for a fact that Apple possesses a software tool that would enable them to unlock this phone it becomes a precedent that the government can find a judge to approve any time it suits their agenda. http://techcrunch.com/2016/02/18/no-apple-has-not-unlocked-70-iphones-for-law-enforcement/

The Gov has most likely already gotten into this phone thru "brute force" -meaning they ran a cracker to figure out the password. That takes time and more importantly Apple makes it a pain in the ass because there is a wait before another code can be tried. Some people says it locks up after 5 false tries. Don't really need the OS to look at the data anyway, but then again it's a pain to take apart the phone, take out surface mount memory chip or hook leads into the chip.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

apple is not only manufacturer. The inside, there are many patented miniature systems

Chinese lt some people say they copycat apple, they sure impeovechinese couldn't care less some say Apple caved in.d intr=erior, We Japanese copycatted Chinese brain. now American tech companies depend on Chinese brain and

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"Don't really need the OS to look at the data anyway, but then again it's a pain to take apart the phone, take out surface mount memory chip or hook leads into the chip." - comments

Good call.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"I have nothing to hide" has and never will be be a valid reason for illegally intruding into another persons private life.

K, fair enough. But can we make an exception for radical scum like Tashfeen Malik?? The FBI is doing an investigation. Hillary is cooperating.

Why have our renowned Federal Agencies like the FBI, DEA, Secret Service etc . . . . when we prevent them from doing their jobs? Going into cellphones, cellphone records etc. are common protocol in law enforcement investigations. In this case "Terrorism" on american soil.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The Gov has most likely already gotten into this phone thru "brute force" -meaning they ran a cracker to figure out the password.

Not if the phone was set to wipe itself after 5 incorrect password attempts. Brute force attacks won't do anything then.

Don't really need the OS to look at the data anyway, but then again it's a pain to take apart the phone, take out surface mount memory chip or hook leads into the chip.

The data is encrypted, and even if decrypted, would be in machine language, so it wouldn't do anything without the OS.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

“It just occurred to me” would be his method of governing"

At least it occured to him. It didn't occur to anyone else, apparently.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I worked Security in IT and I as an Admin could not read the encrypted Passwords, all we could is reset them.

I know Android will do a Factory Reset automatic after too many failed login attempts. Had to do it to a friend's phone as he forgot the Pattern to login.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I worked Security in IT and I as an Admin could not read the encrypted Passwords, all we could is reset them.

Passwords are actually hashed, not encrypted. Encryption can be reversed (decrypting), hashing cannot.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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