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Privacy vs security at heart of Apple phone decrypt order

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What the FBI wants from Apple is a Master Encryption Key that can unlock ANY iPhone and not just this particular iPhone used by the terrorist from San Bernardino County. Apple has already unlocked that iPhone for the FBI and that is not what concerns Apple.

What concerns Apple is the potential mishandling by the FBI of this Encryption Software.

I mean how many times in the news do we hear about Government Entities being hacked by the Chinese and the Russians? 4? 10 times?

The Pentagon complains that China is hacking them almost every day and some information may have been compromised sensitive to our National Security.

What makes anyone be live the FBI will be responsible with our Personal Information to our iPhones and what happens if that Encryption Software gets stolen or sold to Bad People? Who at the FBI will be accountable?

I tell you who - nobody and they'll simply blame it on Apple.

No way. Good move Apple and stick to your guns Tim!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Apple has already unlocked that iPhone for the FBI

Really? The article, in both paras 1 & 2, says that the FBI want to break into one particular iPhone.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

No, according to Apple's today they had actually already gone in and unlocked that particular phone.

What also concerns Apple and many iPhone users is that the FBI will also have the ability with this encryption software to be able to log onto your phone while you're using it and activate your WebCam your microphone and essentially watch everything you're doing on your phone. That to me is worse then the USA Patroit Act!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Here's the letter, since the article didn't bother to link to it: http://www.apple.com/customer-letter/

No, according to Apple's today they had actually already gone in and unlocked that particular phone.

That goes against everything I've read, and I couldn't find any references to that when just googling. Can you please provide a link to support this claim.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Go open an X-File: you're not opening our iPhones!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I agree with the FBI in principle. They are not asking to have access to huge numbers of Apple customers, but just to one stolen phone of a killed jihadist. However, the government has shown little tolerance for American's privacy. This makes me hesitate and question whether Apple has a point.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Saketown

No, according to Apple's today they had actually already gone in and unlocked that particular phone.

Can you please provide a link to support this claim.

Well, can you?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I think Apple would find a way to do it if the attack had occurred on one of their campuses.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I think Apple would find a way to do it if the attack had occurred on one of their campuses.

I think they wouldn't.

See how my entirely baseless presumption negates yours?

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Strangerland: I think they wouldn't. See how my entirely baseless presumption negates yours?

Except mine is based on observation of news reports about Apple over 20-30 years in the tech industry, I don't know what yours is based on. Friends at Apple who wouldn't lie to you?

Apple'd probably want to keep it quiet, but they'd probably even offer their services upfront, without law enforcement having to ask them.

So where is that sainted company in Silicon Valley you're confusing Apple with?

I imagine Apple helped Palo Alto police right away when the late Steve Jobs' own computers were burgled from his home. But it took a normal Joe eight months of wrangling with Apple tech support, including two ignored subpoenas, before two tweets 4 months apart to Tim Cook finally got action on getting his stolen laptop tracked.

Or just google 'Apple Foxconn', browse through a few pages of hits and a few articles, and see if you still have the same opinion on the relative "baseless"-ness of our opinions. Or google "google|apple|facebook pandering to china".

http://www.pcworld.com/article/261018/how_police_tracked_down_steve_jobs_stolen_ipads.html

http://macdailynews.com/2013/01/19/kariem-mcfarlin-gets-7-years-for-burglarizing-steve-jobs-home-other-bay-area-residences/

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/cops-found-stolen-laptop-thief-called-apple-tech/story?id=23272720

... When he called Apple, he said the tech support staff person informed him that someone had called about a laptop with his serial number, but he was told law enforcement would have to call the company for more information.

"That was the start of an eight-month battle with Apple to get the information from them," Witonis told ABCNews.com.

Witonis said Apple responded to two subpoenas by only confirming the request for information, explaining that the company has an internal process for cases like his. ...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Except mine is based on observation of news reports about Apple over 20-30 years in the tech industry, I don't know what yours is based on

Same as yours, so you're still negated.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

It may have been suggested, but just have Apple decrypt the phone (without giving the how), collect the information, and give THAT to the government. Otherwise it's pretty clear the government just wants the ability to unlock any and all phones as they please.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

turbosat - I think you're correct. As an aside, you can always silence one particular child by mentioning Filippina sex trade victims. That will get the thread back on point in a hurry

Moderator: You're heading for a permanent ban unless you rethink your posting behavior.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

...just heard/saw Cruze on CNN show how little he understands (unchallenged) what's at stake here, let alone the process as APPLE is clearly explaning it and its connection to the concern. Twit.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Stranger! You confuse bitterness with the absolute joy with which I destroyed you on your admitted love of Fillippina sex slaves! Its recorded history!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Strangerland: Same as yours, so you're still negated.

Except that I've been living in Silicon Valley for 20 years, with local inundation of Apple stories, whereas you have been living where? Japan?

And I've provided two disparate stories (with links!) illustrating the disparate treatment by Apple of privacy when it suits them.

And .... your assumption of relative baselessness is baseless, being based on no evidence whatsover, just whatever popped into your head at the moment.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

And yet we're both speculating on what we've read and what we've heard.

So my speculation negates yours.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Agree, Smith.

Apple could respond to the order without providing crypto keys or specialized tools that could be used to unlock other phones. Apple technicians could create software that would unlock the phone, allowing the company to create a backup file with all of its contents that they could provide to law enforcement...

It is an unusual request, and Apple is correct - and will win plaudits from consumers and rights advocates - for not casually tossing over the keys to their kingdom. Provide a backup and destroy the tools that enabled it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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