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UK leadership hopefuls vow to succeed where May failed on Brexit

37 Comments
By Dmitry ZAKS

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It will be embarrassing to have a buffoon head the country.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Tory moderates have launched an 'Anyone but Boris' campaign. At least they can see through him.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

This is the man who compared the border in Ireland, with all its complexities, to congestion charges in London. A disaster for Irish and Anglo relations if this idiot gets in.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

These brexit morons, same kind of square minded Trumpetfans ...

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Pukey2:

Join the club, my friend. Many of us worldwide already know what that feels like.

Remarkable that allegedly sane and sensible people will be looking at Boris and saying "Yes! I want that man to lead my country!"

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Scary to think that Boris and Trump will be leading what was once the two greatest powers in the world.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Tory Stewart is the sanest and smartest of the lot, but in the midst of the country's Brexit delirium when Bojingo is drumming for a dive into the abyss, it's unlikely that sane will be the choice of the cliff-hanging Tories.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Turnout for the EU election in the UK looks around 38% (nowhere near my overly-optimistic 55%).

Most of the Tories know that if they don't elect a Brexiteer who promotes WTO, they'll be sunk. However, I think even with them knowing this, they'll still choose another half-in and half-out candidate. Around two-thirds of the Tory party are remainers, and I can't see them going for a clean Brexit.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

‘Anyone but Boris’

This is the hope. He’s made a lot of enemies over the years and is resented by many for his transparent opportunism. He can’t be trusted.

The other candidates don’t fill me with confidence but Johnson would be a disaster.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The UK has been an independent nation for centuries. Just as Japan is an independent nation.

The idea that the UK NEEDS a bunch of unelected, arrogant, condescending twats in Brussels to tell them how to run their affairs is laughable.

The EU is the fulfillment of Marx's dreams and the UK staying in would be spitting in the faces of all those lads that fought to save the UK from the Germans in WWI and WW2 and from the Marxists in the Cold War!!

Live Free and Fight Tyrannical Rulers!!

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

@zones2surf

You forgot about fighting Napoleon.

Are you parodying the letters page of the Daily Mail?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Following and listening to the conservative leadership candidates, all still seem to be obvious to the fact that the Withdrawal agreement, negotiated between the EU and UK, a legally binding Treaty after all, cannot simple be ripped up, or renegotiated, there is provision in the yet to be ratified document to achieve this.

Also a number of candidates are refusing to state there position on whether they still would support Theresa May deal, Rory Stewart, and Justice Secretary David Gauke to name two, thus continuing to attempt a strategy ramming the bill through parliament.

There could be as many as twelve candidates. Where UK withdrawal from the EU is concerned, all twelve can't agree if the light on or off.

Either revoke Article 50 and remain a member state, or break cleanly on Halloween.....Its take it or leave it.

President Emmanuel Macron stated Friday on a live youtube broadcast, the EU future to be ‘federation of nation states.’

To suggest such a "transnational" system of Government could ever be democratically accountable is simply dishonest. Historic/cultural diverse political barriers cannot so arrogantly be brushed aside.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I also wish people would stop calling him by the chummy appellation of "Boris". Nothing chummy about this man. Some of you might remember the dubious phone call with Darius Guppy, who wanted to beat up a journalist and wanted Johnson's help.

This is not a man who should have been foreign secretary, let alone considered for the PM gig.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Sorry, I mean there is no provision in the yet to be ratified document to achieve this. first paragraph.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The idea that the UK NEEDS a bunch of unelected, arrogant, condescending twats in Brussels to tell them how to run their affairs is laughable.

Ironic. Following in the footsteps of Theresa May and Gordon Brown, this new PM will be yet another unelected leader. And let's not forget just how desperate the UK was to join the EEC, back in the 70s.

The EU is the fulfillment of Marx's dreams and the UK staying in would be spitting in the faces of all those lads that fought to save the UK from the Germans in WWI and WW2 and from the Marxists in the Cold War!!

So why did so many left wingers vote leave? Why is socialist Jeremy Corbyn anti-EU?

Also, a lot of people forget that without the USSR, the war would have gone rather badly for rest of the allies. Even if Stalin was in charge.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

There is no-one in the UK capable of delivering this, especially in the prevailing lippy, gift-of-the-gab, shout down-your-opponent atmosphere right now, unless they are hiding in the wings.

David Cameron should have done so but seeing the results of his miscalculation quickly stepped aside, disowning his baby.

Totally unnecessary, but it is what the crowd continues to demand, so everyone should be mentally and physically prepared for a No Deal rupture. Like a child losing a tooth.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

So why did so many left wingers vote leave?

Don’t bring facts into the discussion whatever you do.

Brexit was a victory for conservatives and patriots over socialists and SJWs.

Anything more nuanced than that makes some people’s heads explode.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@Toasted Heretic

"A disaster for Irish and Anglo relations if this idiot gets in.'

Not just for Irish and Anglo relations. It will be a disaster, full stop.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Boris is on his bike.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

zones2surfToday  11:14 am JST

The UK has been an independent nation for centuries. Just as Japan is an independent nation.

The idea that the UK NEEDS a bunch of unelected, arrogant, condescending twats in Brussels to tell them how to run their affairs is laughable.

Sounds like a pretty good description of the Tories except for the "unelected" bit. Who are these unelected people in Brussels anyway? Not the MEPs, surely?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@Simon Foston

MEPs are elected, but they have no power to legislate or repeal law.

The EU commission has the power to legislate, but its members are not elected individually.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36429482

The European Parliament must approve the Commission as a whole but does not vote on individual commissioners.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

To suggest such a "transnational" system of Government could ever be democratically accountable is simply dishonest.

And the UK should know, having been a "transnational" system for a few hundred years.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The UK is in the process of committing national suicide. Soon it will just be England alone.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Albaleo,

I genuinely am an advocate, politically and economically of devolved government, and supported the Scottish referendum for Independence. Not because of knuckle dragging separatist nationalism, but being able to hold the politicians who represent us fully accountable.

United Kingdom just four nations. is still in many respects governed from Westminster, there has been changes but suspicion and mistrust still manifest anger and resentment. Imagine a federal transnational government over 28 nations?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I am not Scottish.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

JimizoToday  11:49 am JST

Don’t bring facts into the discussion whatever you do. Brexit was a victory for conservatives and patriots over socialists and SJWs. 

Jimizo, while I’m sure you’re being satirical, the time for avoidance of cranial eruption has passed. Brexit was a victory of manipulative players over a population who feel resentment at being forgotten or set aside. Farage et al has come along and said “there there I’ll make you feel wanted again”. The fact that Farage has done nothing constructive in 20 years, can’t possibly keep his promises and is backed by the super rich elite he pretends to rail against is lost in all the hyperbole. It’s quite sad, those who’ve bought into the flannel are largely those most likely to be harmed by it.

The Conservatives have been slowly imploding over Europe for 40 odd years. Farage and his new Special Purpose Vehicle appear to be hastening that process...so it’s not all bad. It’s just a shame the UK is likely to be paying for it for a very long time to come.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

They ear hardly likely to vow to fail!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Tangerine2000Today  01:55 pm JST

MEPs are elected, but they have no power to legislate or repeal law.

The EU commission has the power to legislate, but its members are not elected individually.

The EU Commission proposes legislation, it has no power to impose it. All proposed legislation is approved or rejected by the EU Parliament and the Council of the EU which are the elected bodies over the Commission.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@SwissToni

I don't disagree with you. I was merely pointing out that when people complain about unelected people in Brussels they are referring to the commission and not the MEPs. At best it can be said that they are appointed instead of being elected.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Imagine a federal transnational government over 28 nations?

I think we're far from that situation at the moment. It's more like we have a transnational government among 28 nations. If it stays more or less that way, I'd be OK.

Right now, I live under four layers of government (excluding nature and my mother-in-law). Local council, Scottish government, UK government, and the EU. Of those, I'd say the EU has the least impact on my life. They don't tell me when to put out the refuse bins, when to pay my taxes, where I can park my car. They do stop me going to war with another member country. Given Europe's past history, I'd say that's a major benefit.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

From Cool Britannia to Dysfunctional Britannia. Sad.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I would say to predict further integration towards a federal European government, and a shared common fiscal/monetary policy supported with a banking union would be subject to wild speculation rather than measured proven timescales...

The European Ombudsman, Emily O'Reilly, has detailed clear recommendations for the Council of the EU to respect terms of regulatory and legislative transparency. And so allow citizens the opportunity to challenge the process.

The Ombudsman specifically criticises the Council’s failure systematically to record the identity of Member States taking positions during discussions on draft legislation, and the widespread practice of disproportionately marking documents as not for circulation, or “LIMITE”.

Ombudsman says Member States must open up their opaque negotiations on EU laws..........

https://www.ombudsman.europa.eu/en/press-release/en/89685

This European parliamentary elections will probably shape, at least short to medium term perceived political social economic challenges.

The successful candidate for conservative party leadership election could well hinge on the final post ballot of party members.

Frankly it is difficult to choose a favourite from such motley bunch of charlatans.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'd say the EU has the least impact on my life. 

If you truly believe that, I would contend that you are not paying attention. The EU sets macro policies that override local law but are implemented and ultimately enforced at the local level (or by a regional authority). The EU regulates every area of people’s lives from health care, energy usage, employment conditions, etc. If you refuse to comply with a E.U. energy conservation policy you will be fined. Refuse to pay that fine and your property can be seized and you will eventually be jailed - not by someone from Brussels but by a local or regional law enforcement authority.

The problem with large government systems is that they always tend to increase in centralization and power over the lives of those within its purview. That’s fine if your ideological viewpoint is ascendant. But in large multicultural governing systems there will always be those with a viewpoint that will be seen as a threat to the dominant view. Even the American Founders, who contrived a governing system meant to thwart this tendency, were eventually defeated by the gravity and natural tendency of power to concentrate.

Britain, by voting to break with the E.U., is ahead of the curve. They will have to make a hard break from Brussels- that’s plainly obvious by the failures of PM May. This should happen sooner rather than later so the nation can chart a new course forward. A new free trade agreement with the US would be a good start.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Wolfpack, what are you talking about? That’s not the way it works at all. The EU Parliament agrees common policy which the Commission implements across borders by asking each country’s legislators to enact national legislation. Punishment for breaking the law is squarely within national remit. As far as the UK is concerned you cannot lose your home if you’re unable to pay a fine. You might be imprisoned if you willfully refuse to pay a fine. But that is nothing to do with the EU.

The EU has no regulatory power over national healthcare policy other than the reciprocal healthcare agreement. The EU has lots of touch points ensuring commonality of rules, educational standards, fair trading standards, cross border police cooperation etc but EU nations are sovereign.

The knowledge of workings of the EU is woeful. I guess this is why people believe the anti EU rhetoric without question. Confirmation bias is a powerful thing.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Even most of the 'Real Whitish British' have never understood what Brexit with deal or no deal is all about. They have been scratching their head since June 2016.

It's simple yet complicated because we are not sure of the result of either Yes or No.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

“It will be embarrassing to have a buffoon head the country.”

Pukey 2, you get used to it. It’s like a low-grade hang-over that doesn’t go away (perhaps because one is so despondent that one drinks “frequently “).

& Boris Johnson? I take cold comfort in realizing that We Americans are not unique in our ability to choose lunatics with ridiculous hair for national leaders

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Boris ain't no Trump! UK going down the tubes. I could even see them breaking up.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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