world

Ukraine parliament removes Yanukovich

20 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2014.

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

20 Comments
Login to comment

From now on, it would not be wrong to claim that Germany (and not EU) has replaced Russia as the dominant power in eastern Europe.

After Poland and Ukraine, next is Belarus.

The lost of Ukraine will have huge economic and political implications for Putin's Russia.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

US and EU will be behind the people of Ukraine that is moving towards the democracy. This will be a real test to Putin's power and he will DO everything to keep Ukraine under his wings. There will be more uprising among other Eastern Europe.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

In the end, Yanukovich has only himself to blame. The protests started as peaceful. The violence started when he ordered troops to clear them out. What happens next in this situation is chaos, and with the chaos comes the undesirables who thrive in it. Then the government that created it focuses on the undesirables and tries to pin the blame on them and then tries to paint every protester with the same brush.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

" In the end, Yanukovich has only himself to blame. The protests started as peaceful. The violence started when he ordered troops to clear them out. What happens next in this situation is chaos, and with the chaos comes the undesirables who thrive in it. Then the government that created it focuses on the undesirables and tries to pin the blame on them and then tries to paint every protester with the same brush."

I mostly agree with that. Yank's forces escalated the situation, kinda forcing the protesters' hands to violence, though I also think the protesters were not very unwilling either.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Globalwatcher...us is irrelevant and will not be able to influence Russian policy one way or another. Ukraine will always depend on russia for natural resources and any intervention by the west will and has proved to be short lived. Its actually funny that you say that US will stand by and support the Ukrainian people. What you really mean to say is that US will support any uprising that will challenge the pro Russian government. This of course comes as no surprise as it has happened before in seria where US has supplied weapons to alkaeda resistance groups. Same groups that threatens US security. US government will do anything to protect its financial interests at any danger cost to their own people. The funny and ironically strange thing is that American people will blindly follow any decision that their government makes as long as there is a label of democracy and freedom to justify their actions.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

@TokyoDiman

Ukraine will always depend on russia for natural resources and any intervention by the west will and has proved to be short lived. Its actually funny that you say that US will stand by and support the Ukrainian people.

True. In addition : if the Ukraine will be split after a possible Civil War, finally Russia will win. Simply because Crimea and Eastern Ukraine will be parts of Russian Federation.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

If Russia does not like the result, it will turn off its gas/oil/money flow. This could end up costing the EU a lot of Euro. For the moment the power is back with the people. In the end will the country be split?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Congratulations Ukraine, you have succeeded in destroying your own country in almost a month.

Always the same scenario. Brainwash the younger with "freedom" , "democracy" and how it is cool in the West after bombarding with fun youth TV series.

Then manipulate them, appeal to the disappointed in the population(like in every country), bring in and arm some hooligans to provoke the government.

Bring the media and present this as a movement for freedom, bombard us with propaganda of the people trying to liberating themselves from an oppressive government although there are a minority.

And here you go with another Libya, Syria, etc.

And when the country is completely destroyed like in Libya nothing in the media anymore, those who were supporting the "people" disappear, those who were bombarding us on facebook and twitter with articles on how the government was oppressive will not post or share the current chaos in the country after regime change.

Libya is in chaos and no one talk about it anymore. Really, congratulations Ukraine. The best you will have if not another Libya is maybe something like Greece by joining the EU.

" In the end, Yanukovich has only himself to blame."

Yes, he was indecisive and weak.

I'm also very disappointed that Russia is letting the Western countries messing in her backyards. I don't know if it's restraint or just fear.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

One look at the private residence of this coward will convince anyone that he needed to leave. He was just another puppet of Putin. A putin puppy will feed at his master's trough at the cost of the people of Ukraine. Yes, the master will turn off the gas, but the people will endure just as they did in Berlin so long ago when the model for Putin reigned. Sad, sad, sad.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@afroengineer

I'm also very disappointed that Russia is letting the Western countries messing in her backyards. I don't know if it's restraint or just fear.

Time will show. Eastern Ukraine and Crimea always were on Russian side. Western Ukraine always was rotten.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

@Afroengineer

Libya is in chaos and no one talk about it anymore. Really, congratulations Ukraine. The best you will have if not another Libya is maybe something like Greece by joining the EU.

Not likely. The EU simply haven't enough fund to "save" Ukraine like they did to Greece. I think the best bet for Ukraine is assure Russia that they still have the shared interest. It will be difficult, because the most likely scenario is that Russia (and Belarus) will make economical rise very difficult and use the usual tricks. There will be something "wrong" in the documents and merchandise will be stuck at the borders. There will be the need to raise the gas price. And somehow the Russian fighters will get lost in Ukrainian airspace.

To attract investors Uraina's geography, energy prize and safety is either very good or very bad depending of their relationship with Russia. The EU is easier to negotiate with, and they should not cause problems.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Let Ukraine decide its fate, even if it means a split. And they probably should.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I wonder what Putin's response will be now that the Olympics are over?

Will he invade the Ukraine to reinstall Yanukovich as President or will he allow this vital asset slip from under his fingers?

My opinion, he has no choice, he has to move in as he did in Georgia. Just hope that this doesn't explode into something bigger.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

What some of you dont understand is that Ukraine has no industry. They depend on Russian for absolutely everything. In fact a lot of ukranians are moving to Russia to find jobs as Russian is basically their native language. Ukaraine needs russia its not the other way around. Russia is only concerned with Ukraine as a buffer to the west. Nobody likes America meddling in their back yard. Same as china and north Korea. The divide and split is funded and entirely sponsored by the west with no concern over the ukranian people's safety or stability. Russia will and should definitely impose imbargos on Ukraine when it comes to natural resources if ukraine decides to divide. They should not receive any benefits they have been used to of they bite the hand that feeds. Noriyosan.....actually I liken Abe more to Hitler then putin. Trying to change history to suit their interests sounds like Nazi germany to me. Russia is now finally getting back on their feet and standard of living has increased dramatically. Russia has the resources and the land to become the most desired place to be in in the near future.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

TokyoDimanFeb. 24, 2014 - 09:36AM JST What some of you dont understand is that Ukraine has no industry. They depend on Russian for absolutely everything.

If Russia doesn't need the Ukraine then what about it's Black Sea Fleet or it's oil pipelines?

What do you think Putin will do?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

JoeBigs...EXCLUSIVE-Russia to resume oil pipeline supplies to Ukraine's Odessa <http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/article/idUKL6N0JW22H20131217?irpc=932

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

TokyoDimanFeb. 24, 2014 - 12:54PM JST JoeBigs...EXCLUSIVE-Russia to resume oil pipeline supplies to Ukraine's Odessa <http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/article/idUKL6N0JW22H20131217?irpc=932

Yes, but that report is from December and not after the fall Yanukovych. What now?

Do you think that Russia will move in or will they make an agreement with Finland?

What do you think?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Putin does have interests in Ukraine a desire to keep NATO and U.S. military bases out, ties with Ukrainian aircraft and shipbuilding enterprises closely linked with Russia's military and industrial complex, his own Black Sea Fleet, in Ukraine's port of Sevastopol on the Crimean peninsula, as well as ensuring unimpeded transit of natural gas to Europe. Putin and his advisers essentially see Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians as one people.

I don't think the Russians are about to invade Crimea. What I think is more likely is that, in the future, the various regions of Ukraine will present their own claims and may go in different directions on a number of issues. And attempts by Kiev to clamp down on those autonomous or regionalist tendencies could lead to a new spike in tensions in Ukraine. This is because I believe that Putin and the russian government gave up on Yanukovich long ago whos only goal is to stay in power and to protect his wealth and the wealth of his family. With Yanukovich vacillating between Russia and Europe and always having his own private interests in mind. The only way I see russia sending in military forces is if a full blown civil war breaks out and russia needs to protect their cremian population.The main driving force behind his policy towards Ukraine will be not a desire for expansion, but a desire to reduce the risk of chaos spilling into Russia. Also you must remember a Ukraine in continuing turmoil would make a difficult and unpredictable Russian intervention almost inevitable and make it even less likely that the country could ever pay off its huge Russian gas bills.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

TokyoDimanFeb. 24, 2014 - 02:41PM JST Putin does have interests in Ukraine a desire to keep NATO and U.S. military bases out, ties with Ukrainian aircraft and shipbuilding enterprises closely linked with Russia's military and industrial complex, his own Black Sea Fleet, in Ukraine's port of Sevastopol on the Crimean peninsula, as well as ensuring unimpeded transit of natural gas to Europe. Putin and his advisers essentially see Russians, Ukrainians and Belarusians as one people.

Thank you for your opinion, I was curious. Hope that everything works itself out and there won't be any loss of life.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

TokyoDiman I don't think the Russians are about to invade Crimea. What I think is more likely is that, in the future, the various regions of Ukraine will present their own claims and may go in different directions on a number of issues

Russia is not recognized new "government"

And openly support South-East and Crimea of course

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites