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Johnson's top aide says UK lawmakers can't stop no-deal Brexi

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Johnson is endangering the peace process. The backstop is a necessary apparatus to ensure no hard border.

The EU is rightly standing firm with Varadakar.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The backstop is a necessary apparatus to ensure no hard border.

According to the EU:

Backstop = No hard border

No-deal = No hard border

https://twitter.com/nick_gutteridge/status/1110130145514438656

Ireland's positon

Backstop = We will not have a hard border

No-deal = We will not have a hard border

Why bother with the backstop?

The EU is rightly standing firm with Varadakar.

The EU is using Ireland as a pawn.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Ireland has benefited from being an EU member and the EU has made it clear that the backstop is essential.

Of course, it's now easy to scapegoat Ireland for the British intransigence. And to pander to Unionist demands.

Much easier than owning the problem that had been stoked by Brexiteers. You wanted to leave but you still want to dictate to the EU and Ireland. Good luck with that.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There are many products which crosses over the borders several times before being completed. Business will suffer.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

the EU has made it clear that the backstop is essential

For the treaty that May tried to pass, yes.

Of course, it's now easy to scapegoat Ireland for the British intransigence.

I don't think anyone is trying to scapegoat Ireland. Can you provide an example?

You wanted to leave but you still want to dictate to the EU and Ireland.

Has Britain stated it will build a hard border?

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal there will be a hard border between the UK and the EU including the Irish border.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal there will be a hard border between the UK and the EU including the Irish border.

The British Government has said they have no intention of creating a hard border.

The Irish Taoiseach already admitted there will be no hard border in the event of no-deal:

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/taoiseach-insists-there-will-be-no-hard-border-despite-eu-statement-1.3767158

The EU also admitted that they have no plans to introduce a hard border in that situation:

https://twitter.com/nick_gutteridge/status/1110130145514438656

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

There will be borders between the EU and the UK come Nov 1st. There are already passport controls at ports and on the tunnel. Driving your car into Europe will require a green card.

The life will change, that's all down to Brexit.

If WTO Rules are applied there will be huge tariffs on farm produce exported to the EU. Average tariffs of 84% would be levied on beef exports, 48% on lamb, 37% on poultry, 30% on pork and 53% on wheat, according to the National Farmers’ Union.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Zichi. You said the following:

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal there will be a hard border between the UK and the EU including the Irish border.

There won't be a hard border.

There will be borders between the EU and the UK come Nov 1st.

We already have borders because the UK isn't part of the Schengen area.

There are already passport controls at ports and on the tunnel.

There are already passport checks.

If WTO Rules are applied there will be huge tariffs on farm produce exported to the EU.

If the EU want to do that, that is fine, but the UK can do the same in return. Considering the EU sells a lot more to the UK than vice versa, they'll be losing out a lot more.

https://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/CBP-7851

UK exports to the EU £289 billion (46% of trade)

EU exports to the UK £345 billion (8% of trade)

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

After two years of preparations, Eurotunnel declared itself ready for a no-deal in March. It has spent £13m on new infrastructure, including passport controls and additional border inspection posts in Calais. Eurostar bosses also say they have ‘firm plans’ in place to maintain services after a government assessment warned in February of long queues at London St Pancras station.

UK lorries will be granted temporary haulage rights until the end of the year to ensure ‘basic connectivity’ and help minimise disruption at Calais and other ports.

Bosses at Calais have insisted that a no-deal will not create delays. A demarcated holding area has been created for lorry drivers who do not have the right paperwork in order not to slow down transit times.

France is also recruiting 700 customs officials by 2020 for Calais, Dunkirk, Le Harve and the Channel Tunnel.

On the English side of the Channel, plans are in place for up to 11,000 lorries to queue on the M20 if there are delays at Dover. Manston airport could be used as an ‘overspill’ lorry park. Highways Agency traffic officers will be able to fine hauliers £300 if their drivers ignore orders or try and jump the queue.

Drivers taking their vehicle abroad will need a so-called Green Card, which guarantees that they have the necessary minimum level of motor insurance. Drivers are being advised to allow one month to get this from their vehicle insurance company.

They will also need a GB sticker and an International Driving Permit, which can be bought at the Post Office for £5.50.

UK travellers will get a stamp in their passport every time they enter and might lose access to the EU lane at some European airports - possibly resulting in longer queues.

Other airports, however, are well prepared. Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam will have ‘mobile passport control desks’ for British travellers, while Faro airport in Portugal will have separate lanes for British nationals.

British tourists may need to show a return or onward ticket and that they have enough money for their stay, although this is not expected to be rigorously enforced.

There will be no change for British passport holders arriving at Heathrow: they will still queue alongside EU travellers and those from other countries including the US, Canada and Australia.

All this and more?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

All this and more?

I should think so. It sounds like they've made good preparations to minimize disruptions.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

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