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Johnson says prepare for no-trade deal Brexit; cancels talks

28 Comments
By Guy Faulconbridge and William James

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"A tumultuous "no deal" finale to the United Kingdom's five-year Brexit crisis would sow chaos through the delicate supply chains that stretch across Britain, the EU and beyond - just as the economic hit from the coronavirus pandemic worsens."

I like how some people seem to think this is surprising, and not deserved. It's neither, and I hope all those who supported Brexit simply out of xenophobia and arrogance realise it, and realise they are suffering at their own hands.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Blablabla...there will be some sort of deal. Johnson's plan will work. Trust me. EU is shaking their pants and already push Barnier to keep going. Markel cannot disappoint car industries in Germany and Macron big man who has been saying about no more talk with UK since year 3 I guess will curl like a baby when Markel slap him to shout up. It's all about business.

Bedides, worrying about Irish border shouldn't be EU concern. If UK put hard one there then they will have to deal with consequences.

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

Quelle surprise! The Brits residing in the Tory Fawlty Towers B&B have now made their lumpy Brexit beds and will have to lie in them and they'll soon get their full English Brexit (over)done and served up as promised by barmy Boris and his shower of incompetents. Guten Appetit!

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Number 10…… “Lord Frost has spoken to Michel Bernier to update the EU on the Prime Minister’s statement. as the PM had made clear, the European Council’s conclusions yesterday had left us without a basis to continue the trade talks without a fundamental change in the EU’s approach to these negotiation.so accordingly no basis for negotiations in London as of Monday”

Can you seriously imagine either the US or Japan politically joining such a Union?

That’s parliament is nothing more than a fake democracy, whose own ombudsman has demanded reform of the Council of Ministers opaque secretive legislative process. only to be ignored.

Do you really believe that either the America or Japanese electorate would vote to join?

And yet to democratically  vote to leave, is an act akin to xenophobia?

Remarkable

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

Continuing....

The only Prime Minster without his own head up his backside (not rude) is Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte…..

“We’re ready to compromise. We will not get what we want 100 percent – that’s impossible in a negotiation, you always have to find a compromise.”

Something that cannot be said about the cretinous posturing French President

 

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

Well good luck UK !

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

This spells the end of the UK, not only as an economic power but as a nation. Scotland will leave and Northern Ireland will revolt after being pressed into poverty.

Johnson and his cronies are still thinking that “ Britain rules the waves” and that illusionary platform will doom the country.

He will go down in history alright but For all the wrong reasons

6 ( +9 / -3 )

robert maes, your point, indeed there’s a deference between debate on governance and definition of the democratic mandate.

I am a firm believer in Scottish independence.

And I also believe that a positive vote by the people of Scotland to break, no, choose to decide course as a independent nation, to manage its own affairs, give Scotland it best chance to succeed.

That could mean swallow Scotland national debt.

Help with the currency issue, be friends not foes.

Be disappointed, but never belligerent. I have learnt that in business.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Can you seriously imagine either the US or Japan politically joining such a Union?

I can't imagine them being invited, and I can't see the point of either inviting them or of them joining. That's a no all round then, which has nothing to do with Britain's membership of the EU, or whether the EU itself is a good idea.

And yet to democratically vote to leave, is an act akin to xenophobia?

Obviously not. But this vote was based on a poorly handled referendum and a Vote Leave campaign that both exploited and encouraged xenophobia. The pressure to have a referendum in the first place came after a long tabloid-dominated press campaign that was itself deeply rooted in xenophobia.

So Brexit has been and remains xenophobic. The consequences will be shared by all, however, and the xenophobes can continue to blame the EU, immigrants, and ethnic minorities for the next 50 years. And they will, because Brexit was never about doing something positive or moving forward, it was about acting on resentment. The resentment isn't going to disappear.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Something that cannot be said about the cretinous posturing French President

Yes ,the French President is what is really bad about politics in Europe. He is slowly but surely making France an un-livable and no-tourist destination in the world.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

wipeout, I am obviously not aware your birth place, formal country of origin.

A Country/State has to apply to become a member. So lets assume for a moment that the Country has a formal democratic process to ask the people.

My question, wipeout, is simple, if you are a member of a third country do you believe your people would be prepared to join?

If so, would it then not, if the situation prevailed/omit be allowed without fear or favor the democratic choice to leave?

xenophobes? come on please

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

continuing.....

yakyak, I spent my early students (economics) years in Caluire (Lyon).

I adored the couture, the culture, the people, the country, the cuisine.

My beef, for want of a better word, is well, Macron.

And his petty politicking.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I fully expect to see the dissolution of the UK in my lifetime. Once a hard border goes up between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland and the Scots declare independence, UK will be consumed by internal civil wars. At that point the terms of trade with the EU will be of only minor importance in the larger scheme of things.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

No Deal please! It's the only way a clean break can be achieved.

It won't be a No Deal, though. Boris will cave as usual.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Desert Tortoise,

That has to be a parody of some comical sketch. a short of brain dead Monty Python.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

continuing ......

Tangerine2000, yes, but I believe it wont, the tone and bureaucracy is tethered to an Mary Poppins sing a long

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

With high hearts and with complete confidence, we will prepare to embrace the alternative and we will prosper mightily as an independent free trading nation, controlling and setting our own laws

Boris's Churchill moment?

Never in the field of human conning have so many been so duped by so few.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@Mickelicious

Excellent response to Johnson's typical pipe-dream bombast.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Once a hard border goes up between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland and the Scots declare independence, UK will be consumed by internal civil wars.

Um, okay. Back in the real world, business will always find a way and things will carry on.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Let's be in no doubt there be a hordes of private funded, registered, fishery protection vessels armed to the teeth.

Not with fisherman but with ex military service man, in essence mercenaries.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Yakyak. Your comment seems based on your opinions and NOT facts. You wrote about how bad a politician Macron is and how he is making France unliveable. What is the source of your information? Name one country in the world which has not suffered from no tourists due to Covid. Do you honestly think Boris Johnson is a better leader? You sound like a BrexItear with a lot of anger. Please get your facts right before you write in such an impulsive manner.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"No Deal please! It's the only way a clean break can be achieved."

Could not agree more.

At the same time, (please Japan), deport ALL the retired Brexiteers.

They must come back to experience, "in loco" what is coming.

10 ( +14 / -4 )

A Country/State has to apply to become a member. So lets assume for a moment that the Country has a formal democratic process to ask the people.

My question, wipeout, is simple, if you are a member of a third country do you believe your people would be prepared to join?

No, that's not a simple question. First, a country either has to be invited to join, or has to campaign to be invited to join. So far, and this doesn't look likely to change soon, the only countries considered eligible for membership are European, or in the case of Turkey (which for a variety of reasons on the EU side, remains disqualified), partially European. Cyprus is a somewhat minor geographical exception.

It is therefore pointless to consider your question seriously in terms of the first two countries you offered as examples, the United States and Japan. It is also pointless to consider it in terms of what you call "a third country" as if any country might be eligible: as it currently stands, the list of potential future states is a very short one, and is confined to countries that are indisputably European. In addition, no country can join without the unanimous agreement of the member states.

Ultimately your latest question to me boils down to, you're fishing for my nationality. It's not something I have made a secret of in JT, but I bring it up only when I choose (never on demand) and probably not with great frequency, because I tend to mention it when it may have - in my view - some useful bearing on the comment I am making. Most of the time it's not that important. But anyone who has been commenting here a few years probably knows it.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Um, okay. Back in the real world, business will always find a way and things will carry on.

This has little to do about business. It is a political problem. The Scots have made it pretty clear that if the UK leaves the EU, they want out of the UK. As for Northern Ireland, a hard customs border will of necessity go up if there is no agreement between UK and the EU. That is a direct violation of the Good Friday Accords and will lead to a resumption of the Troubles. The EU has already hinted that it will support Irish reunification so expect a lot of outside help to the Catholic rebels in Northern Ireland. A UK shorn of Northern Ireland and Scotland isn't much economically. Business goes where there is money to be made and politics are stable. Good luck UK but I honestly expect to see the end of the UK within the next ten to at most twenty years. They have nobody but themselves to blame.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

wipeout, thank you for your reply.

My question is conjectural. 

Yes, I am intrigued, mostly in respect I was being nosey. apology's I am working on that flaw.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes, I am intrigued, mostly in respect I was being nosey. apology's I am working on that flaw.

It doesn't bother me at all, my point really is that I couldn't answer that question without explaining my nationality.

The closest I could come to giving an answer anyway is that each country is different. There are very few candidates for future EU membership, Turkey was hoping to join about 10 or 15 years ago, but I'm not sure about its status now as it's been through a political upheaval since then. And there was a lot of reluctance on the EU side anyway, along with some things that, until such time as they are fixed, outright disqualified Turkey.

Other potential states are all European, I think at the moment all candidates are Balkan states, mostly former Yugoslavian, and I wouldn't know about public sentiment in any of them.

Your question as it applies to me can be considered this way: if I was Irish, I'd be from a country where that is already settled, they're a member of the EU and they're not itching to leave. If I was British, I'd be from a country that has already voted to leave. If I was Australian, no one would dream of asking my country to join, and we would not be asking to do so. Etc. The question doesn't really get us anywhere, and any answer I give wouldn't tell us anything about the viability of the EU, or its credibility now and in the future. Or whether other countries are going to vote to leave or join.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I choose to be hold a Japanese passport when the time required me to.

So I was not eligible to vote in UK referendum.

What I am requesting without any requirement to divulge your nationally, hypothetically.

Would you vote to join such a Union.

If yes I would like to debate that.

No trickery.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

No trickery.

I'm indifferent to whether you consider it trickery to have the weakness of the question about joining explained to you. You started by applying it to the United States and Japan, two countries that are not and never would be eligible for EU membership. You asked again in reference to "a third country", as if any country, and who gives a damn which continent it's in, could be in the running, which is obviously not the case.

If we consider countries that actually are eligible and may join in the future, there are at present about 5 candidates. Each has its own circumstances which may affect how the vote goes, and I don't have enough knowledge of them to speak on behalf of Albanians or Croatians, or an interest in doing so.

This is all by way of pointing out that what you said is a simple question, isn't. No matter how directly you address it to me. The UK, which is leaving, was a member of the EU long ago, and the Common Market before that. Considering whether I today, if British, would vote to join is about as pointless as considering whether a Scottish person or a Welsh person would vote to join the United Kingdom: a purely hypothetical situation that requires pretending that history had taken a different course. All to find out what my vote would be in a vote that isn't going to be held. I suspect that your real point is that you think my answer should be no. While my real point is that I think the question is close to meaningless, for the reasons, among others, that I have already made clear above.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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