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May seeks to end Brexit stalemate after winning confidence vote

23 Comments
By Kylie MacLellan and William James

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23 Comments
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Whatever one thinks of the Brexit vote, the majority of voters did vote for Brexit. The government told the voters that the results would be respected and implemented, whatever the results were.

This is how democracy and elections work. That is democracy in action and whatever one thinks of the results, democracy can only survive if the rule of law is respected.

Imagine if every election was subject to a do-over or the results could be ignored if the results were not as one would wish?!

That is a recipe for tyranny.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

No deal Brexit, Ms May. Get it done.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Imagine if every election was subject to a do-over or the results could be ignored if the results were not as one would wish?!

I'd say it's not such a problem. If a government ignores the results of a referendum (on free ice cream, say), voters have a chance to get rid of the government at the next election. An elected government implementing a proposal it doesn't support is a recipe for chaos. Tyranny doesn't come into it.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Would hardly call May staying as Premier a victory.Not after that resounding hell no to her Brexit proposal.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Imagine if every election was subject to a do-over or the results could be ignored if the results were not as one would wish?!

Iirc, it happened with the Maastricht and Nice referenda for Denmark and Ireland, respectively.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Iirc, it happened with the Maastricht and Nice referenda for Denmark and Ireland, respectively.

Indeed it did. Which clearly is what the EU is pushing for here as well.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Indeed it did. Which clearly is what the EU is pushing for here as well.

I think the people who voted remain are pushing for a second vote, rather than the mandarins in Brussells.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The Brexit vote should never have been a simple majority. For such a major decision, with massive long-term ramifications, something like a two-thirds majority should have been the way to go. For the record, if I were still living in the UK, my vote would always have been to Remain. But sometimes you just have to accept it - the other side wins.

I think the only way the UK can remain - and it could work out this way - is if the whole Brexit process just proves entirely unworkable and there's no alternative to another referendum. But if Remain did win a second vote, that will leave a whole lot of UK citizens utterly pissed off with what they'll see as nothing more than a betrayal of their own rights and opinions. Troubles ahead, no matter which way you go.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I really admire May's resilience in this brexit farce. Most leaders would've resigned or accepted the situation "as it is"

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I think the people who voted remain are pushing for a second vote, rather than the mandarins in Brussells.

Well, yes, they are. Because, of course, they lost, so they want a do-over. Another bite at the apple.

And rest assured, they will assure that the do-over is fixed in such a way as to ensure that Brexit doesn't happen.

Whereas, the EU basically just wants the UK to decide to abandon Brexit altogether.

Both Remainers and the EU want the same thing: for the UK to remain in the EU. The Remainers just want to put some veneer of "democracy" on it. The EU cares not one whit about democracy or what the citizens really want.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

No deal can work because the EU has made it abundantly clear there is no room for discussions, and amending the backstop is logically impossible. So it's remain or no-deal. Now that the choice is clear, unlike before when people could hide behind the "of course the EU will give us a sweetheart deal" fakery, the only way to decide is through a popular vote.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

So it's remain or no-deal.

The voters voted to Leave. So, if the only way to Leave is no deal, then Leave on no deal terms it is.

WTO terms it is.

So, just get on with it!!

The EU will suffer far more than the UK will as a result, and UK MPs job is to represent what their constituencies voted for.

Which was:

Leave!!!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The EU will suffer far more than the UK will as a result

Please explain this. I don’t think the question of who will suffer most is a particularly useful one in the first place, but I’d still be interested in your reasons why.

and UK MPs job is to represent what their constituencies voted for.

I have some sympathy for this idea. I think too many MPs, particularly high-ranking and/or ambitious ones, can forget they are elected first and foremost to represent the people of their constituencies.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

British democracy is formally based on the principal of cultural conventions, statute law, case law, and enshrined in in a legislative parliamentary sovereignty.

Fundamentally Government is directly accountable to Parliament, Parliament is directly accountable to the people.

There is no place or need in British democracy, for an EU federalist superstate.

The whole economic debate for ever closer union/cooperation revolves around a common fiscal policy, harmonisation, to centralise the whole decision making process not only for monetary policy but also for political integration. Without debt mutilation, or fiscal/monetary transfers. Germany politically, economically would be in a position to dominate the agenda.

All in complete disregard for public opinion and. devoid of any democratic mandate.

The synopsis that suggest either a soft or hard brexit is an illusionary pretence to manipulate and steer a bogus and fraudulent people vote, to cheat the electorate into continued membership of a broken and flawed Union.

There is no provision contained within the Lisbon Treaty for soft or hard withdrawal.

By it's very nature and design, the Lisbon Treaty is a rules based legislative framework A member state is either in or out.

So a clean break is the only opinion to membership.

Don't be frightened of change. A clean sheet, a visionary global trade policy, coupled with the complete dismantling of the EU Common Agricultural Policy, and a review/reform of EU regulations will give businesses and consumers choice.

EEA/ETFA membership is an anthems for the UK, the UK economy contributes close to 20% to the single market.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@Toasted

Only some of those who voted Remain are pushing for a second referendum. Many of the people who voted remain don't wish to see a re-run. So, I think it's fair to say that it is mostly the Establishment who are pushing for it.

@theeastisred

Leaving was decided in 2016. Despite people who oppose Brexit saying "people didn't know what they were voting for" and "we know so much more now", it has been decided.

There shouldn't be any talk of remaining. As has been pointed out here before, if Remain had won by even a single vote, there'd be no discussion about the possibility of having a second referendum with Leave as an option.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Everyone knows that if there were a 2nd referendum, many of the jokesters who voted Leave would change to Remain,tilting a Remain. So instead of taxpayers monies being wasted,just unilaterally cancel the Brexit. Democracy is starting to look outdated of recent anyway going by world leaders.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

After the results of the confidence vote were announced to cheers from Conservative lawmakers, May said she believed parliament had a duty to find a solution that that delivered on the 2016 Brexit referendum result.

Is that what she believes? Because she's spent her entire time in power sabotaging Brexit, rather than delivering on the result. She's been trying to get us to change our minds, to back out on what we voted for. If she'd actually been trying to deliver on the referendum result, we wouldn't be in this mess. The negotiations would have concluded, on our end at least, though the EU would still be trying to tempt us (without success) to stay. Instead, May and her pro-EU flunkies destroyed the referendum result, with assistance from the EU itself.

But with lawmakers deadlocked on the way forward, the United Kingdom could face a disorderly "no-deal" Brexit, a delay to Brexit, or even another referendum on membership.

May will be doing everything she can to incur the second of these outcomes while pushing to make the third: the second referendum, a reality. This must not be allowed to happen. Delaying will only drag out the inevitable, hurting our economy in the process, while a second referendum would be heavily (and covertly) influenced by the EU, who will no doubt allocate funds towards propoganda to try and sway those who originally voted Leave. Thanks to May, our only realistic option for upholding the Leave vote is to take a no-deal exit. It'll be rough, but we'll recover from it.

However, opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said no positive talks were possible unless a no-deal Brexit was ruled out.

That Nazi-sympathising, veteran snubbing piece of work can go take a long walk off a short pier. The no-deal option is our only hope of getting out of the EU intact, thanks to May's sabotage.

Tuesday's crushing defeat appears to have killed off May's two-year strategy of forging an amicable divorce

That's not what her two-year strategy has been. It's what she's claimed it's been, but that's a lie. Her strategy was to betray the voters, destroy Brexit, secure a second referendum and see us remain trapped in a failing EU that pretends to be a democracy but is far from that.

For the EU, already reeling from crises over debt and refugees, Brexit is possibly the biggest blow in its 60-year history, though its 27 other members have shown remarkable unity on the issue.

Which is the main reason the EU is fighting so hard to stop us leaving. They want our taxpayer money to help pay off the debts incurred by other nations whose economies collapsed through poor decisions by poor leaders. Britain is little more than a cash pinata to the EU, and they can't afford to let us go. If we leave, the EU's economy will collapse entirely. It's only through a combination of joining the 27 other nations and the EU's policies on trade negotiations that allow it to outperform the UK in terms of economic clout. If the UK were independent though, we'd be able to forge all the trade deals we'd want and end up overtaking the EU once more. That's why the EU has been pushing so hard to make more and more trade deals outside the continent, like with Japan: they're trying to get ahead of us on the trade deals to stop us from surviving without them. It's a very cowardly tactic to employ. Also, I'd like to point out that the 27 other nations aren't that united. There's a strong anti-EU sentiment in Germany, France, Poland and several other European countries, and that sentiment is growing stronger, especially since the referendum. Freedom from the EU oligarchy, and freedom from debts incurred by other nations, is sorely tempting. The EU is a failed project. A good concept, but poorly executed. More and more people are seeing this and want out. It is only the leaders and MEPs, in other words: the people being bribed by the EU, who show any unity, and will continue to do so as long as they're getting paid to act that way. No act can last forever though.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The law making process in the EU consists of the MEPs rubber stamping laws that not only do they not understand but also which they do not debate-laws which affect all member states!

Only a complete moron would acquiescence to such a charade....

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It's like a divorce where Europe just wants to move on with their life, but UK's personal issues are bogging down the divorce process

0 ( +1 / -1 )

For the EU, already reeling from crises over debt and refugees, Brexit is possibly the biggest blow in its 60-year history, though its 27 other members have shown remarkable unity on the issue.

Calls have grown from pro-EU lawmakers from both her own party and the opposition for another referendum with an option to cancel Brexit. Labour has said it will rule nothing out if it fails to bring May down.

I'm beginning to suspect that the Britain's movers and shakers, and the EU powerbrokers would like to drag this out until the Brits can hold another vote on whether or not Brits should leave the EU. And they're hoping the Brits will stay with the E.U..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

the EU powerbrokers would like to drag this out until the Brits can hold another vote on whether or not Brits should leave the EU.

The EU definitely prefers the UK to stay, but whether the UK stays or goes, the last thing the EU wants is a dragged-out process

The EU didn't want this headache in the first place - they already have other headaches they have to deal with. The UK created this headache, and the last thing the EU would want is to get dragged out by UK's headache while paralyzing many affairs of the EU as it waits for the UK to decide one way or another

Like a headache, the EU just wants it over with --whether to heal it or cut it off-- so that the body is no longer paralyzed by the headache and thus can move on with its life and do what it's gotta do

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Only some of those who voted Remain are pushing for a second referendum. Many of the people who voted remain don't wish to see a re-run. So, I think it's fair to say that it is mostly the Establishment who are pushing for it.

Incorrect. Some leavers and remainers are pushing for a second referendum. And some aren't.

It really isn't as black and white as some seem to think it is.

I was in the remain camp but I feel that the people spoke - however badly they were informed - so the result should be respected.

That said, many left wing voters opted to leave. It's a mess, for sure.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Sorry, let me re-phrase. Not entirely correct, as opposed to my absolute "incorrect".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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