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Britain tells EU to engage seriously on Brexit

13 Comments
By Alistair Smout

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13 Comments
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Article 50 clearly states that ‘negotiation’ may be part of the withdrawal process yet the EU doesn’t wish to engage!

Thus the intransigence is creating more and more discord within the UK.It is time to look for strong trade deals with the US and President Trump has already offered to aid the UK in this regard.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

UK creates a problem... and now others have to solve it for them?

Time to move out of your parents' basement, UK, and start taking some responsibility.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

It is not the U.K. with the problem!

The problem is that the EU is dysfunctional!

Colossal waste, beaureacratic unelected officials in charge of policy making for people in far away places,economic debacles ie Greece, excessive secrecy,ram rodding of legislation which the MEPs have little knowledge of, let alone time to debate!

There is more but I’m sure everyone gets the main gist.....

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The UK thinks that this a game. They are no longer a powerful empire. They should either get with the program or get on. The EU is the only side sticking to the rules of the contractual agreement.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The UK doesn't think this a game. This issue has split the country, it has even split family and friends apart.

The EU has made absolutely no comprosmises up to this point in time, so it isn't a negotiation in any sense. In contrast, May on behalf of the UK (without support mind you), has agreed to pay 40 billion pounds, extend freedom of movement, allow the ECHR and ECJ to have ultimate authority over UK law even after the UK has left.

After all of that, nothing. The EU simply wants to UK to capitulate on every point. The EU is not interested in negotiating.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

It is not the U.K. with the problem!

Yes it is. The UK now have to solve their own problems, on their own.

The problem is that the EU is dysfunctional!

When you divorce, you are no longer concerned with the laundry of your ex.

President Trump has already offered to aid the UK

He could give advice to rebuild Hadrian's wall.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 with Denmark and Ireland.

There it is. We signed up to be part of an economic community, not what the EU has morphed into today.

English people are fed with being told that they have to do.  What is the problem with that?

Japan gets to pick and choose who comes into their country and who doesn't.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Ms. May is not capable of dealing with this, and Mr. Macron was right in his assessment. British voters blindly believed whatever bilge Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage peddled. Needless to say, those 2 men have lots of money and no worries, regardless of the outcome. Everyone else? Not looking good. 

If UK doesn’t get its act together, and take the tough love it’s going to get, we will see the sun set on what’s left of the British Empire.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

CrazyJoe, don't just on the bandwagon and repeat that drivel that British voters were deceived. It's a popular thing to say but just not true. The general sentiment in England today is roughly the same as it was when people voted - 50/50.

52% of brits voted to leave, that is a majority. It's not nice, it's not pretty, but it is what it is and now we need to leave.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The United Kingdom joined the European Economic Community (as it then was) on 1 January 1973 with Denmark and Ireland.

There it is. We signed up to be part of an economic community, not what the EU has morphed into today.

Yep. My mother voted to join in the 70s but voted out in in the last referendum precisely because it morphed into a behemoth.

Just as an aside to those who like to stereotype out voters, my mum is a delightful elderly Irish lady and a mad Trotskyite who thinks Corbyn is a sell-out. I don’t think I’ve ever come across anyone further away from the small-minded, xenophobic, Daily Mail/Express reading Little Englander.

For anyone interested in looking outside the stereotype of the out voter, have a read of what the late, great, grand old leftie Tony Benn said about the European project.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Just a short question: Why would EU be interested in negotiation anything, and what does it have to win by conceding some points?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why would EU be interested in negotiation anything?

If the EU fails to attain a free trade agreement with the UK:

Germany's automotive industry will be adversely affected due to its reliance on UK suppliers and custom.

Malta, Cyprus and Luxembourg would be heavily affected due to their reliance on the UK's financial services.

In addition, it is commonly known that UK imports from the EU are worth £341 billion, whereas UK exports to the EU are worth £274 billion. Any introduction of tariffs will hit European businesses harder than the UK.

Finally, the EU would no longer recieve annual contributions from the UK, which in 2016 were £13.1 billion (£8.6 billion net). The UK is the second largest net financial contributor to the EU out of the 28 member states.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Bluff and double-bluff. EU is probably afraid of a UK hard Brexit.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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