world

U.S. charges WikiLeaks founder Assange with espionage

19 Comments
By Sarah N Lynch and Mark Hosenball

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2019.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

19 Comments
Login to comment

Donny turning in those that helped him win the presidency.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

True journalism does three things; it curates information, allows rebuttal, and provides context. A dump of documents is not publication, and definitely not journalistic publication.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Julian Assange, member of Trump's campaign team who worked with Trump "buddy" Roger Stone to release Russian stolen e-mails - shows he's a typical Trump supporter by being indicted on over 18 different crimes...

Just like any crime family, you prove your worth in Trump-world by showing how many laws you can break...

Or how close you can work with Russians...

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

This is terrifying, and an overreach of power and suppression of basic press freedom one would expect from China or the USSR. And, if these comments are any indication, some people are fine with it. Sad that people will literally turn their country into a police state out of spite for one politician they don't like.

True journalism does three things; it curates information, allows rebuttal, and provides context. 

That's your own personal definition of journalism. The founding fathers made no such distinctions. Neither do honest journalists, many of whom have spoken out against this action. Freedom of press is just that. If you allow the government to modify it by creating their own definition of what the press is, then that freedom is gone. Why are people so eager to defend an extensive secret police apparatus?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The charges which Assange had thought would be bought have arrived so I hope the UK will refuse his extradition to America where he will be imprisoned for life.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This is terrifying, and an overreach of power and suppression of basic press freedom one would expect from China or the USSR. And, if these comments are any indication, some people are fine with it. Sad that people will literally turn their country into a police state out of spite for one politician they don't like.

Damn right. I loathe Trump and his gang but the likes of Assange and Chelsea Manning are heroes of the modern age, journalists and whistleblowers exposing the war crimes of the US. The silence of the corporate media over what's being done to these people is an utter disgrace.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Japan has a Directorate for Signals Intelligence, which is basically the Japanese NSA.

Imagine if Assange had been in contact with someone on the inside, convinced that person to remove Top Secret files, then transmit them overseas where they would be placed on the internet for anyone in the world to see by Assange. Next, suppose 20 Japanese living abroad (probably most in China) were arrested and killed because of those leaks.

What charges would Assange be charged with by Japan?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Nice. It proves (if anybody needed such proof) that the whole story with "rapes" in Sweden was a hoax and just an excuse to prosecute Assange for revealing U.S. dirty linen. But if the U.S wants to prosecute non-American citizens for that it also must admit the right of other countries to hunt down and prosecute American citizens for "espionage", just like they did with Assange.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

That's your own personal definition of journalism. The founding fathers made no such distinctions. Neither do honest journalists, many of whom have spoken out against this action. Freedom of press is just that. If you allow the government to modify it by creating their own definition of what the press is, then that freedom is gone. Why are people so eager to defend an extensive secret police apparatus?

Have you read the caselaw regarding the free press?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Have you read the caselaw regarding the free press?

Is the denial of basic freedoms and rights OK if it's supported by case law? China uses case law, too. That's a very bureaucratic and narrow way of looking at an important issue.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Strange (or maybe not) how this Reuters report fails to mention that Assange has been charged with violating the 1917 Espionage Act, the most discredited piece of anti-democratic legislation ( bar the 1918 Sedition Act) passed by panicked American politicians , and which after slavery and the decimation of the Native American population and the shameful internment of American citizens of Japanese origins is the most outrageous assault on human rights in the history of the Republic. Assange can expect no more justice than John Walker Lindh, dubbed "The American Taliban" by a jingoistic press, who was railroaded on trumped up charges, put before a kangeroo court and given a draconian 20 yr sentence. The Brits need to stand up to the vindictive right-wing warmongers of Amerika whose war crimes Assange and Manning exposed and refuse to hand him over. Since the treacherous Tories can only fawn, bow and scrape to their Amerikan "friends", it will be up to Prime Minister Corbyn to tell Trump and the Pentagon cabal of war criminals where to shove their Espionage Act.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The charges.

https://apps.npr.org/documents/document.html?id=6024868-Assange-Superseding-Indictment

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is the denial of basic freedoms and rights OK if it's supported by case law? China uses case law, too. That's a very bureaucratic and narrow way of looking at an important issue.

I'll take that as a no.

Aloreciate the virtue-signaling rebuke. Unfortunately, you assume far too much.

The caselaw is the current law of the land, which means it's the starting point for all conversations regarding a free press.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

He talked tough and defiant, all the way until they dragged him out of the embassy, kicking and screaming like a little girl. Sorry Julian, it's time to pay the piper, there is a jail cell in Leavenworth with your name on it.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Assange is Wikileaks.

An investigation by the Associated Press

has found the names and addresses of teenage rape victims, people who have suffered sexual abuse, and information about individuals suffering mental illness in documents on Wikileaks.

Human rights groups have asked Wikileaks many times to do more to censor information found in documents. They fear reprisals against aid workers, activists and civilians named in the leaked data.

Wikileaks' 2007 exposure of widespread corruption in Kenya influenced violence during national elections that led to 1,300 deaths.

https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-37165230

This is not some great person, though some of the leaked documents have been an overall "good" for the world.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This below bothers me far more than what he exposed, showing his total lack of mercy for the weak.

Quote: "...he jeopardized the lives of human sources that included Afghans, Iraqis, journalists, religious leaders, human rights advocates and political dissidents from repressive regimes by publishing their identities. Law enforcement officials said on Thursday that the State Department had pleaded with Assange not to reveal the identities of such sources, but Wikileaks ignored the warning."

Why can't they reveal what they know about other things, such as Malaysian Flight 370, for example?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

> Aloreciate the virtue-signaling rebuke. Unfortunately, you assume far too much.

The caselaw is the current law of the land, which means it's the starting point for all conversations regarding a free press.

I had to Google aloreciate. Surprised that the same guy who never heard of crisps could know a word I didn't. Almost had me there.

Yes, case law is the law of the land. No, that doesn't mean it's the starting point of all conversations on a free press, unless you want it to be. Free speech is recognized as a basic human right by almost all free societies. Case law is just a collection of previous decisions by flawed judges in what may well have been a flawed system. As I said, China and just about any other authoritarian regime can cite how they are abiding by the "law of the land." Stalin, Hitler, you name it... they all followed the law of the land at the time. That's how meaningless case law is when talking about more important concepts such as freedom of speech and the press.

If you were really familiar with case law, you would understand this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

President Trump used to say he likes "WikiLeaks"

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/11/politics/wikileaks-donald-trump-julian-assange-campaign/index.html

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/04/donald-trump-wikileaks-julian-assange-arrest

though now hes sort of distanced himself from that. Perhaps he can make amends, by giving Assange a Presidential Pardon under the excuse of saving Tax Payers money (particularly since he doesnt pay Tax).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

(Continued)... he can point towards the Controversial issues as being Democrat caused, and were rightly exposed,. (Friendly Fire/Innocents being Targeted/Waterboarding/etc)

Also he could say that as he doesn't pay tax himself, he's doing it for the rest of the US Tax "payers" who do pay tax monies.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites