world

Opposition to block British PM Johnson's early election bid

66 Comments
By Kylie MacLellan and Guy Faulconbridge

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2019.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

66 Comments
Login to comment

The politicians who have delayed Brexit should go to prison for circumventing the will of the people.

For taking part in lawful parliamentary votes - the exact thing our democracy is built on? I don't follow your logic.

How could that result in a prison sentence?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

SerranoSep. 7  10:44 pm JST

Pffft! The politicians who have delayed Brexit should go to prison for circumventing the will of the people.

It's also "the will of the people" that elected those politicians in the 2017 general election. Or should they go to prison for reflecting the views of their constituents?

StrangerlandSep. 7  10:47 pm JST

Non-binding referendum mate. That's not the will of the people.

Indeed not, the general election is a more recent reflection of their views.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Good grief!

Westminster voting intention:

CON: 31% (+10)

LAB: 28% (-3)

LDEM: 19% (+6)

BREX: 15% (-4)

GRN: 2% (-3)

via @Panelbase, 05 - 06 Sep

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Just behind the bull, the brexit is about to drop.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@zichi

Yes. Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union outlines the procedure for leaving the EU. The ECJ case originally started in a Scottish court, which asked the Court of Justice to clarify the issue of revocation of the intention to withdraw from the EU, this is in line with the Vienna Convention on International Treaties which governs all treaties between states.

One thing that was clear that whatever happens it must be decided through the British political system.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yes, I agree there too, but one should never say things are certain.

nothing isc ertain, but if I had to give odds that Boris will succeed in a no deal Brexit, youd be a brave person to place a bet on that, care to wager!?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Lucas Simms

ok so the Article 50 is the legal document for leaving the EU but the UK Parliament can also cancel it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@zichi

The European Court of Justice disagreed with that. It has ruled that a withdrawing member state may revoke its intention to withdraw from the EU unilaterally, meaning that  the revocation decision is not subject to the unanimous consent of the European Council, the European institution representing the member states. The court added that the court added that the decision to revoke Article 50 must be “unequivocal and unconditional”. This means that the member state has to make it clear that it wishes to maintain its EU membership.

https://theconversation.com/article-50-can-be-revoked-heres-what-it-means-for-brexit-108522

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Q. What would happen if the entire Government Resigned ?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

On 29 March 2017, the EU Commission stated "It is up to the United Kingdom to trigger Article 50. But once triggered, it cannot be unilaterally reversed. Notification is a point of no return. Article 50 does not provide for the unilateral withdrawal of notification."

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

For the benefit of the willfully ignorant and the hard of thinking;

Misconduct in public office is a criminal offence: cps.gov.uk/legal-guidance/misconduct-public-office , as is conspiracy to commit the same. This is the law, Prime Ministers are not exempt.

Deliberately seeking to break the law as a public official would be an offence with serious prison time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The last time Johnson was this close to jail was when the Bullingdon trashed a restaurant.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Pffft! The politicians who have delayed Brexit should go to prison for circumventing the will of the people.

Non-binding referendum mate. That's not the will of the people.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Boris Johnson could go to prison if he refuses to delay Brexit

Pffft! The politicians who have delayed Brexit should go to prison for circumventing the will of the people.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Boris Johnson could go to prison if he refuses to delay Brexit, former Director of Public Prosecutions Lord MacDonald says

I wonder if he’ll ruffle his hair up for visits.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Doesn't look as if you read the rest of the comment.

I did read it. I don't entirely disagree.

I think virtually everyone else knows what she'll do.

Yes, I agree there too, but one should never say things are certain.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Boris Johnson could go to prison if he refuses to delay Brexit, former Director of Public Prosecutions Lord MacDonald says

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Tangerine2000Today  10:13 pm JST

"We no longer live in the world of Stuart monarchs."

"This gets really tiresome. You cannot even be arsed to see what I was replying to."

Doesn't look as if you read the rest of the comment.

I have no idea whether the Queen will give Royal Assent on Monday morning or not.

I think virtually everyone else knows what she'll do.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I have no idea whether the Queen will give Royal Assent on Monday morning or not.

My guess is she will.

Don’t let desperation cloud your judgement.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

We no longer live in the world of Stuart monarchs.

This gets really tiresome. You cannot even be arsed to see what I was replying to.

I have no idea whether the Queen will give Royal Assent on Monday morning or not. But, if she doesn't, I am going to laugh so hard.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

According to reports in UK media, a group of MPs opposed to no deal asked the EU if an extension was possible, the answer being yes.

And for those who think Johnson is the totalitarian dictator of their dreams and is untouchable, a former Director of Public Prosecution told Sky News earlier that Johnson can definately go to prison if he does not request an extension.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Brexit is a special circumstance.

Special according to a definition of convenience applied by you, or special in some legally or constitutionally applicable way?

Just a few years later in 1707, Queen Anne went against Parliament and refused Royal Assent.

We no longer live in the world of Stuart monarchs. There is zero chance that the current monarch will break with modern practice (and crap on a legacy she has painstakingly built over 60 years) to deliver a victory over Parliament to a crummy spiv like Johnson. Our royals aren't renowned for their sharp intellectual powers, but she should be as aware as most of us that he could so easily be gone by Christmas. Or next week.

Hardly someone worth hitching her reputation to, is it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

What BJ says has as much credibility as DJT's fatuous fabrications, but the difference is that the former can't get away with it, as his stunt using police officers for a background to his electioneering proved. The credulity of the Brits will not stretch so far as to allow a Trump-like character to triumph with bull of that ilk.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Didn't say "most important event in 400 years".

Did say "Brexit is a special circumstance".

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Brexit is a special circumstance.

The most important for over 400 years? Please, get some perspective Four hundred years ago, Britain was just emerging from its time as an absolute monarchy, and conditionally we have moved on a lot since then. We are talking about the way we implement a marginal vote to leave a free trade zone.

To suggest that the PM can ask the Queen to not sign acts of parliament is ludicrous and would quickly lead to the end of the Queen in her current constitutional position.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Well, Mr Johnson. I’d rather be Japanese than a citizen of a post-Brexit UK run by you.

And my wish is more and more likely to come true....

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Are Britain's political class serving the interests of the country?

Yes 13%

No 75%

Don't know 12%

Corbyn or No Deal. Which is your preferred option?

No Deal 52%

Corbyn 31%

Don't know 17%

now 17%

Questions designed to illicit a pro-Brexit response.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It's not the law yet. It first has to receiev Royal Assent, which it hasn't. The Queen can withhold Royal Assent on the advice of her ministers (i.e. Boris).2) A court of law cannot compel the PM to do anything.2)

It will receive Royal Assent on Monday. It's a formality. The monarch can listen to the advice of her governemnt but she cannot ignore the will of Parliament. She knows the monarchy will be on dodgy ground if she does.

A court of law cannot compel the PM to do anything.

A court of law cannot compel anyone to do anything, but if you break the law you will be punished for it. No one is above the law, even the PM.

MPs are currently planning legal action if Johnson has not written to the EU requesting an extension by October 19th.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Brexit is more special than most laws but nothing like an act of war, and I would bet you anything the queen gives her assent on Monday.

Yes, the judge decided it was a political issue, not a legal one, so of course it was not in his remit to judge. But what he decided, whatever it was, would have been binding, just like when the Supreme Court told May she needed parliament's consent to trigger A50

2 ( +2 / -0 )

May's Brexit deal had a lot of Britons saying, "I'd rather be dead in a ditch," like Boris said the other day.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Queen Anne's case was in very special circumstances,

Brexit is a special circumstance.

and its still not been refused since

It kind if has. Tony Blair blocked Royal Assent three times.

It was the judges decision! Can you not see that?

Erm....the judge said that judges couldn't make the decision because it is not within their power.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Queen Anne's case was in very special circumstances, in potential wartime, and its still not been refused since 1707, 412 years. Not much chance of that changing now.

You've proved your own case with the proroguement example. It was the judges decision! Can you not see that?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@miss_oikawa

True, but the monarch does not go against parliament. Remember 1640..

Poor example. Just a few years later in 1707, Queen Anne went against Parliament and refused Royal Assent.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/bbc_parliament/2327561.stm

2) Yes, it most certainly can.

No it cannot.

Even in the court case in Edinburgh earlier this week, the Judge refused the hearing against Boris proroguement because as he stated "Accountability for the advise is to parliament and ultimately the electorate and not to the courts"..."It is a political matter, not a legal one."

Please show me where it says that the PM can go to prison for refusing an extension.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

The courts have order parliament before as in the Article 50

"In a judgment that sets a far-reaching constitutional precedent and upholds parliamentary sovereignty, the court ruled by a majority of eight justices to three that MPs and peers must give their consent before the government can trigger article 50 and formally initiate Brexit."

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jan/24/supreme-court-brexit-ruling-parliament-vote-article-50

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Britain is NOT 'first in line' for a post-Brexit U.S. trade deal, White House warns Boris Johnson as Donald Trump's top economic aide says UK will NOT be ready for one soon

1 ( +2 / -1 )

1) True, but the monarch does not go against parliament. Remember 1640..

2) Yes, it most certainly can.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

1) It's not the law yet. It first has to receiev Royal Assent, which it hasn't. The Queen can withhold Royal Assent on the advice of her ministers (i.e. Boris).

2) A court of law cannot compel the PM to do anything.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

It's not "parliament's instructions" . It's the law.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@miss_oikawa

Most certainly not true. Prime ministers can't break the law just as no-one else can. BJ could go to prison if he refused to ask for an extension.

If he broke the law, like murder or arson, then yes, he could be arrested.

But that isn't the case here. A PM cannot be arrested for refusing to follow Parliament's instructions. If you can show me where it states otherwise, I would like to see it.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Tangerine 2000

Most certainly not true. Prime ministers can't break the law just as no-one else can. BJ could go to prison if he refused to ask for an extension.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

If Boris ignores the law and refuses to negotiate a deal he can, in theory, be prosecuted. Interestingly, although Tories are talking about ignoring the law, one ominously told a journalist 'judges don't control the army and the police', the civil service will obey the law and cannot work on anything that results in a no deal. Everything will grind to a halt.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

because its the law and yes the law can force a PM to just that.

https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/role/sovereignty/

"Courts cannot overrule its legislation and no Parliament can pass laws that future Parliaments cannot change."

No court can order Parliament or a PM to do anything. Parliament also cannot force a PM to do anything, if a PM is using the Royal prerogative.

Definition of Royal prerogative:

The monarch is regarded internally as the absolute authority, or "sole prerogative", and prerogative the source of many of the executive powers of the British government.

"So what stops PMs turning into dictators by using the Royal prerogative to do anything they want?", I hear you ask.

If a PM ignores Parliament, they can call a VoNC anytime they like. This makes sure that no PM can get away with abusing the power they wield.

Problem is, Parliament is trying everything in its power to avoid a VoNC (Vote of No Confidence).

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Always thought the Queen could over rule the politicians on matters like this because British Parliament is clearly not working and it would be in the British voters best interests to have parliament dissolved by the Queen and allow the voter decide.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

What are Parliament going to do when Boris refuses to ask for an extension? This is a genuine question.

just in

Brexit: MPs willing to go to court to enforce delay

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-49618242

so since theyve already passed legislation that doesnt allow a No deal Brexit their chance of success is very high, afterall the courts can only make decision based on the laws of the UK. So the question should be will Boris defy the new legislation and the courts!?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Parliament cannot force the PM to do anything if what they legislate conflicts with Royal prerogative.

because its the law and yes the law can force a PM to just that. Boris even stated in a tweet that hed abide by the law and the constitution. If he refuses then he is breaking the law and should resign, his vice PM can take his place. A election takes 2/3 majority , hell never get that number so his options are abide by the law or resign. Trying to waste time will force MP to make new legislation, like a law to force the PM to make a decision before the 31st October.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Corbyn or No Deal. Which is your preferred option?

well thats a stupid question, the question should be

No Deal Brexit

Deal Brexit

of course any sane person should be aiming for a deal with the EU, trying to use a no deal Brexit as the basis of your negotiating power will and has failed miserably. The facts are now that the UK will leave the EU its just depends and how good of a deal they can negotiate with the EU. UK wasnt and isnt in a position to cherry pick the conditions of an EU deal , anybody with half and brain and foresight could have seen this coming. UK voted for Brexit now they have to live with the repercussions of that decision......

that 10,000yen bet is looking pretty good about now.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

British politicians really suck.

at least they have the will and power to stand up to their leader, a leader with no fear of reprisals or circumventing the government isnt a democracy its a dictatorship

3 ( +3 / -0 )

From the post photo who is the biggest bully?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wenger in!!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

SerranoToday  12:36 pm JST

"Brexit remains up in the air more than three years after Britons voted to leave the EU in a 2016 referendum"

"British politicians really suck."

Why do you even care? Worried that your hero the greatest US President of all time is going to look a fool when it turns out he's backed a loser?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

British politicians really suck.

American ones don't?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Brexit remains up in the air more than three years after Britons voted to leave the EU in a 2016 referendum

British politicians really suck.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

If Bozo fails to carry out the will of Parliament, he risks being taken to court and, if a judge ordered him to obey Parliament, he could be held in contempt and even jailed for refusing.

Asked if he would obey the new law's demand for him to write to EU leaders requesting more time, Mr Johnson said: 'I will not. I don't want a delay.'

Bozo could be set to use the election manoeuvring to his advantage by quitting Number 10 in order to hand power to Mr Corbyn, forcing him to call for a Brexit delay and face the backlash from leave voters at the next election.

Bozo will resign and not break the law.

Polls don't matter anymore, we are past all of that.

It only matters what is happening in the elected parliament.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

More polling by Survation:

Should MPs have blocked an election?

Yes 35%

No 43%

Don't know 21%

Should there be an early election?

Yes 48%

No 31%

Don't know 20%

Are Britain's political class serving the interests of the country?

Yes 13%

No 75%

Don't know 12%

Corbyn or No Deal. Which is your preferred option?

No Deal 52%

Corbyn 31%

Don't know 17%

https://twitter.com/Survation/status/1167562146198241280

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

What are Parliament going to do when Boris refuses to ask for an extension? This is a genuine question.

Parliament cannot force the PM to do anything if what they legislate conflicts with Royal prerogative.

I really would like to know. They would have to have a motion of no confidence, which would lead to an election. But in the meantime, if the election is held after October 31, Boris can just press ahead with Brexit.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

PM Bozo has had a week of massive failures one upon the other. Yesterday, saying he would rather die in a ditch than ask for an extension. His only step left is to resign and be one of the shortest term prime ministers.

We had a winter of discontent so this must be the summer of discontent.

Sacking the rebel tories, his bros resigning, defeat in the commons, defeat in the Lords.

Do or die time for Bozo.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Brexit or get off the pot.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

So itll be law soon that requires Brexit with a deal, a no deal Brexit will be illegal. The PM will be rquired by law to negotiate an extention and a deal with the EU, if Boris refuses hell be breaking the law and should resign,

Im still waiting to see all the cards the Brexiteers say the UK holds over the EU in negotiations or the threat of a no deal Brexit may have had. LOL

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Yes, like it says it went through the HofC a day or two ago and has now gone through the House of Lords. It just needs Royal Consent on Monday, which should be a formality.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So do they have the votes to force the delay request?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I wrote this here back in July,

I don't get it. Boris has no chance of coming out of this with both a) his reputation upheld, which if the UK leaves without a deal and Scotland or Ireland leave the union will be the worst in history, and b) his reputation among Leave-supporters intact, which it won't be if he reneges on leaving on Oct 31st, which will be without a deal if it is on that date. He can't win. I really don't see why he's put himself in this position, unless he doesn't really want to be in it but literally can't say no anymore, and has been pushed into it by force of momentum.

but even I didn't think BJ would show much of a wtat he would prove himself to be to the entire world..

Is there anyone left who still says the bumbling moron persona is an "act"?? lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuJHmBW_bgU

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Boris attempting to lead the country by the nose towards disaster.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Photo caption; Just when you thought that there was enough bovine excrement ....

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What a massive load of bull.

I'm refering to the picture, not the words of the PM, but you may well choose a different interpretation.
1 ( +1 / -0 )

Boris Johnson would do anything, no matter how despicable, for Boris Johnson.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I like UK. When you think politics is all rigid and serious, they remind you sometimes it's just a shame.

But good on people for standing up to power abuse, democratic process circumventing and backboneless, incompetent royalty.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites