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Erdogan declares Hagia Sophia a mosque after Turkish court ruling

11 Comments
By Daren Butler and Ece Toksabay

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UNESCO World Heritage Site

One of the most amazing buildings I've ever seen. Erdogan like other authoritarians is appealing to his demographic pushing ultra-nationalistic fervor and 'cultural heritage', going in a different direction from Ataturk's secularism. Erdogan's trying to re-establish a modern version of the Ottoman Empire.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

This is the greatest church of early Christianity. A magnificent building - one of the greatest in the world.

It was converted into a mosque before and attaturk did a great think in making it a museum.

I feel sad for the world. Religious extremism is growing all over. America and the middle east in particular.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It's a shame they built it in Turkey.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

it isn't like there is a huge mosque just a 2 minute walk away from Hagia Sophia - oh - that's right - there is.

One more set of proofs why leaders should be limited for no more than 10 yrs in any high office. 17 yrs is much too long. I'm still missing some Turkish friends after Erdogan rounded up 50,000 political enemies. AKP is on the way out.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

One of the most amazing buildings I've ever seen. Erdogan like other authoritarians is appealing to his demographic pushing ultra-nationalistic fervor and 'cultural heritage', going in a different direction from Ataturk's secularism. Erdogan's trying to re-establish a modern version of the Ottoman Empire.

I mean, it’s in Turkey, what would you suspect?

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Erdogan like other authoritarians is appealing to his demographic pushing ultra-nationalistic fervor and 'cultural heritage', going in a different direction from Ataturk's secularism. Erdogan's trying to re-establish a modern version of the Ottoman Empire. 

I mean, it’s in Turkey, what would you suspect?

Sounds kind of familiar though....lemme think where have I seen that recently?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I think it was best as a museum. Erdogan is pushing the populist angle again.

Not that one can't visit mosques. Have done so a couple of times, although not in Turkey but London and Nicosia.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Not that one can't visit mosques.

The equally gorgeous 'Blue' Mosque a few minutes walk from Hagia Sophia allows visitors.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Mosques in America allow visitors. I've been to a few and they are works of art and architecture in themselves. I've been to a number of houses of worship in that manner.

Notre Dame in Montreal, the New Vrindiban temple in West Virginia, the Temple of 10000 Buddhas in Niagara Falls, Canada, etc.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The equally gorgeous 'Blue' Mosque a few minutes walk from Hagia Sophia allows visitors.

I think all Mosques allow visitors normally, though COVID has changed many things. The 5x daily call to prayer can be deafening depending on where you happen to be at the time.

I think the Blue Mosque aka Sultan Ahmet Camii is prettier from the outside than Ayasofya. Personal opinion. The inside is sorta disappointing with repeating pattern carpet and women are forced to pray at the back. I suppose that could be good, if the choice was theirs.

But the inside of Ayasofya is amazing - or at least it was with the Christian wall hangings that Muhammad says are forbidden. About a mile away is the "New Mosque", also beautiful from the outside and impressive courtyard inside ... "new" means it is only 500 yrs old.

Erdogan's political party lost in the last election for Mayor of Istanbul, a good sign. The city has higher GDP than many countries, so as Istanbul goes, often the rest of the country will follow.

Turkey has been at the crossroads for human commerce for millennia. Around every corner is a history lesson. Beware if you are allergic to cats. In Instanbul, the cats "adopt" a shop and often get a chair or pillow for their trouble. Cats are good at solving any rodent problems humans seem to attract.

Amazing food in Turkey, BTW. They've certainly perfected dishes from around the world regardless of origin, though I can skip the runny, bland, yogurt drink.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Turkey has been at the crossroads for human commerce for millennia

Turkey hasn't been around for millennia. Thrace, on the other hand, has. The Turks are newcomers to the region.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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