world

British PM to suspend parliament before Brexit; opposition denounces 'coup'

91 Comments
By William James and Kate Holton

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2019.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

91 Comments
Login to comment

A dangerous move by Johnson. And a delight for the enemies of the EU.

Boris is exactly what the UK has been looking for, & will prove to be 'a great one!' Love UK."

One of the enemies, there, meddling in the UK's affairs yet again.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

There is no such thing as a no-deal Brexit!

Parliament already has had ample time to debate the issue-years of debate-it has failed!

The EU refused to debate with ex PM May and left her literally in tears!

Boris is made of sterner stuff.

The departure has to be at the end of October.

Already there are doubts about UK democracy.

It seems that the failure of UK parliamentary democracy is the result of this debacle and might well change future UK politics...

-11 ( +6 / -17 )

A spokeswoman for the European Commission, when asked about the British suspension of parliament, said it was a matter for Britain to answer.

In other words, leave us out of this mess.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

And a delight for the enemies of the EU.

Of course they're enemies of the EU. And why shouldn't they be? The EU is a detriment to the UK.

-13 ( +7 / -20 )

"Democracy is so important. It's taught from such a young age as such a vital thing about being a British person and today just completely ruins that, tramples it and throws it out," said 17-year-old student Dylan Butlin, one of the protesters.

Poor Dylan, another victim of the English education system. I would suggest Dylan study about "British democracy" from non-British textbooks.

Let's see. An APPOINTED, not elected, but APPOINTED Prime Minister asks an unelected Queen for an approval of his decision to suspend the parliament so the few elected, among the most unelected, politicians can't block a deal that was voted by 53 percent of the population on the basis of lies, delusions and brutal ignorance? Did i get it right?

If this is what they call "democracy", then they need to invent another word for the system in Switzerland, France, and practically every other developed European country. Of course, when you have NO idea what's it like in other countries, it's easy to see how they would think their system is "democratic". Similar to the way many Japanese think Japan is the only country with 4 seasons, since they have no idea what's it like in other countries.

I am not defending Democracy, because as the American founding fathers said, that's the worst form of governance. Democracy, they said, is the rule of the mob. A republic, on the other hand, is a form of governance in which a certain set of rights are written and protected by the constitution that are not subject to vote, or majority approval. While most States in America have more referendums conducted each other than there ever have been in the entire history of England, those referendums are all on a local level, mostly county, occasionally a State, and they are almost always about decisions concerning public spending on local communities. Occasionally there are referendums on recalling elected officials. In California for example, any State policy related to Taxes cannot take effect without first being approved by a referendum.

I sympathize to an extend with Boris. People voted to Leave, and he gotta do what he gotta do to leave. That's what happens when your country is run by tabloid media.

Zichi will agree with me 100%.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

Goodbye Scotland, goodbye Northern Ireland, goodbye United Kingdom.

Congratulations, Great Britain, you elected yourself another trump. Why, oh, why couldn't you learn from our catastrophic mistake?

13 ( +20 / -7 )

Excellent decision by the PM. "Subverting democracy"?! Give me a break. The people truly subverting democracy are the Remainers who still refuse to accept the result of the referendum back in 2016. Here's hoping for a no-deal Brexit. Go Boris!

-14 ( +7 / -21 )

Just like with Japanese Emperor, British Queen is supposed to be a merely symbolic existence. This move symbolically puts a stain on her whole "clear" record which will be remembered both by the loyal subjects and everyone else.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

just get it done already so you can negotiate free trade deals without the EU shackle. The EU will be hit hard by Trump tariffs, get out now before you loose your shirt.

-10 ( +7 / -17 )

Who ever said UK was a democracy!!!???

Welcome to reality millennials! The Crown is and always has been the boss! That goes for Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Jamaica, and more. No time to explain it to you, go figure it out yourselves. hint, you will not get your answers on facebook or twitter.

-19 ( +3 / -22 )

Even pro-brexit people should be concerned by a move like this.

At least this should encourage the people of Scotland and Northern Ireland to rethink their views on independence.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Unlike Japan, the British Royal Crown in the Head Of State. They are the boss.

-12 ( +2 / -14 )

Just like with Japanese Emperor, British Queen is supposed to be a merely symbolic existence. This move symbolically puts a stain on her whole "clear" record which will be remembered both by the loyal subjects and everyone else.

Actually, in legal theory, the Queen still has the discretionary powers of the Tudors and Stuarts - near absolute power - and it's just by convention that it's never used. That's a far cry from the Emperor, who has been constitutionally neutralized. Of course, the British monarchy would last about an hour if she ever used those powers.

As it is, she is bound by convention to accept the advice of her chief minister. She hasn't taken a side, and anyone complaining about her for that are as dangerous as Johnson.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Goodbye Scotland, goodbye Northern Ireland, goodbye United Kingdom.

Congratulations, Great Britain, you elected yourself another trump. Why, oh, why couldn't you learn from our catastrophic mistake?

Get off the bandwagon. Brexit was voted for and Boris will get it done! Pity you lean so far left you can't see reality!

-16 ( +3 / -19 )

Steven she is endangering harmonic future and well-being of British citizens months from now, when the separation happens. I could not care less for this pathetic political spectacle once cunning Britain is suffering right now. But I do care about the fall-out from the irresponsibility of "leading" politicians, which once again will be felt by ordinary citizens. Who are not doing great by the way mind you.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Time to remove the political power of the monarch. Separation of church and state. Elected lower and upper houses. PM elected by the politicians. Proportional representation includes. Like here in Japan.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

So that's why Farage has been slagging off Prince Harry and Meghan Markle recently and Rupert Murdoch's global empire of filth has been all over Prince Andrew's Epstein connections. Farage/Murdoch knew this was coming and wanted to smear the Royals before it all kicked off.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Of course they're enemies of the EU. And why shouldn't they be? The EU is a detriment to the UK.

A naked assertion. I'm critical discourse amongst adults evidence is always required. Those that fail to probidevit are arguing in bad faith.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Signing petitions is all nice and dandy,but if they want to stop it, more concrete action needs to be taken.Like taking it to the streets if necessary.But like his boy Trump,Johnson is always ready for turning when it's convenient.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Some of these moves to "no-deal" may just be a ploy to shift the happy medium position to Theresa May's deal, which as we have seen would not pass on its own. The closest Parliament came to passing something were the indicative votes on the Nick Boles plan (the Norway, Brexit in name only, missed by three votes that the Lib Dems could have supplied) and the Ken Clarke one (Customs unions, also missed by a handful). This means that the happy medium at the moment is a way softer Brexit than May's deal, which was soundly rejected and will presumably continue to be unless the only alternative is worse (i.e., No Deal). The presentation of No Deal is classic Shock Doctrine tactics. You manufacture a crisis specifically to get people to accept the unacceptable. We've seen it all before.

Anyway, regardless of whether they are a genuine push for No Deal or not, these tactics are sowing yet more division and have roped in the Queen, almost certainly against her will. The Queen has managed to keep her head down for sixty years, and deserves better than this. This will be part of her legacy now. More important though is the way this is ripping ordinary British people apart. Leaders are supposed to bring people together. It is the worst leaders who set them onto each other.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Ruthless.......

The only people you have to look out for in life are the people that don't care about anything or anyone. These are the people that end up teaching your children.” ….........

Treasonous Remainders!”.........

I spent my early collage years as a research assistant, well at 31 not so many years ago, economics and finance, counting from one to ten, also as a subordinate speech writer of sorts, I managed to convince investors to risk there livelihoods, so more luck then judgement.

With a one seat working majority Johnson has thrown the dice. I don't know, three days could rightly or wrongly decide he future of UK future in the European Union

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Johnson in charge of the UK as we go through a no-deal Brexit is a possibility which should terrify anyone with at least half a brain.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Steven she is endangering harmonic future and well-being of British citizens months from now, when the separation happens. I could not care less for this pathetic political spectacle once cunning Britain is suffering right now. But I do care about the fall-out from the irresponsibility of "leading" politicians, which once again will be felt by ordinary citizens. Who are not doing great by the way mind you.

If the Queen intervened every time the people's "harmony and well-being" were threatened, she'd be an absolute monarch.

Requesting such a long suspension is unconventional, but expecting the Queen to respond by breaking an arguably more important convention is outrageous.

The British people made their bed when they gave Cameron his majority, and didn't give May hers. And they'll have another opportunity soon, this year probably. If Brexit happens before then, well, that's the bed they made.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Two points:

Firstly, Parliament has had three years to debate Brexit and yet has been unable to agree anything. Proroguing will deprive MPs of a mere four days to debate Brexit and whatever couldn't be achieved in three years is unlikely to be achieved in four days.

Secondly, suspending Parliament is hardly unheard of. The last time this was done was fore the general election in 2017. I don't recall hearing outraged squeals of protest on that occasion.

No. The real reason for the protests is not the proroguing - it is because Johnson has finally outmanoeuvred those who believe that they rule when, in fact, they are supposed to serve. That's right. Remainers.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

It's unconstitutional!

No, parliament is suspended almost every couple of years. In fact, this time, it's very overdue.

But, it's for 5 weeks! That's unheard of!

No, it's not. John Major prorogued parliament for 6 weeks in 1997.

It's a coup! It's undemocratic!

A constitutional procedure by the lawful government signed off by the head of state, in accordance with precedent, that does not change the government can in no meaningful way be described as a "coup".

Waaaaaaaaah!

A good whine is the product of many sour grapes.

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

The British public did not vote for a no-deal Brexit, they voted for a fantasy sold to them by Johnson, Farage and company and amplified by a Russian disinformation campaign. Furthermore, the vote was only advisory. The proper next step, now that the British public is better informed about the real consequences, is a second referendum. The reason that the UK and US have representative democracies is that common people do not have time to study the issues and trust their elected representatives to do due diligence.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

The shutdown in 1997 for six weeks was followed by a general election.

This time it’s about crashing the ship into the rocks with a no deal.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

It’s hardly a coup. The voters want this. Now if you ask me whether a no deal Brexit will be positive, I would say probably not, but that is certainly what will happen, so people need to work out a lot of stuff really quickly.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

If the Brexiters try to force Brexit without a proper accounting of whether or not it's what the people want to do, it's going to lead to the end of the the UK.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

LOL at the photo.

British "democracy" died when the people's will was overturned by the oligarchs who wanted a Brexit do-over.

"It appears the people have voted Leave. What shall we do?"

"Pretend to go along with it, then ignore their little referendum."

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

@Toasted

There will be a general election after the proroguement, though.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Sorry, meant Zichi

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The voters want this.

Um, how do you know? There's been no referendum nor election to find out how the voters feel. All there is are the results of a non-binding referendum three years ago. The people have had three years to get more information since then. The idea that opinions have shifted one direction of the other is to be frank, entirely boneheaded and stupid.

The idea that the country should make a move such as this, that will affect every citizen world-wide, and all future generations, without doing another check to find out if it is what the people actually want, is simply the idea of some people who are afraid to find out that the people don't want that anymore. So they're trying to force through their own desires over the desires of the UK as a whole.

Very anti-patriotic.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

There will be a general election after the proroguement, though.

it would be more accurate to state there may be an election after the Brexit.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Polls show that only 27% of the UK agree with the coup. that's a lot of Brexiteers that don't agree with the move. The revulsion to this move is cross party, many senior Tories are horrified. Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davison is resigning. Johnson has lied and been deceitful, when asked by journalists on Monday if there will be an attempt to prorogue, No 10 and the Cabinet denied it. Johnson never even bothered to inform the Speaker what he was doing. Disgraceful.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Congratulations, Great Britain, you elected yourself another trump.

A a few thousand members of the Conservative Party elected Johnson as PM, not 'Great Britain'.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@strangerland

The voters want this.

Um, how do you know?

Because 52% voted to leave to EU in 2016. It didn't say "Leave the European Union with a deal, but remain if one isn't possible" on the ballot paper. Parliament has voted down the EU's deal (although I would call it a treaty) three times. The deal has been rejected and so the only option left is to get another deal or leave without one.

@zichi

it would be more accurate to state there may be an election after the Brexit.

Yes. In which case, any of the politcal parties can feel free to campaign on a manifesto of holding another referendum to rejoin or stay out of the EU.

-9 ( +0 / -9 )

Look, the longer people pretend that this isn’t going to happen, the worse the transition will be. It WILL happen. SOON. It’s even too late to stall it more than a week or so.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The Leave campaigners said the EU was undemocratic.

The Leave campaigners said they would restore Parliamentary sovereignty (something they always had anyway)

The Leave campaigners have just undemocratically stopped Parliament from debating and voting beacuse they don't like what they want they want to debate and vote about.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

There'll be a vote of no confidence and the politicians will appeal to HRH Brenda, a woman who is now in her 90s and has enough her plate what with her favourite son, Andy, being in hot water.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The Leave campaigners said the EU was undemocratic.

It is. The EU Parliament is the only parliament in the world that cannot legislate. That is done by the unelected Commission.

The Leave campaigners said they would restore Parliamentary sovereignty (something they always had anyway)

It is being restored.

The Leave campaigners have just undemocratically stopped Parliament from debating and voting beacuse they don't like what they want they want to debate and vote about.

Parliament voted to have the referendum. Parliament voted to enact Article 50 (which means leaving on WTO terms by default if no deal is achieved). Parliament voted down May's deal three times. I think they've had their say.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

I think the most interesting views on proroguing are those of leading members of the current Johnson-led government. Some of these comments were made in the last three months.

 Javid: ‘You don’t deliver democracy by trashing democracy. We aren't selecting a dictator,’

Gove: ‘I will defend democracy. You can't take Britain out of EU against will of Parliament.'

Hancock: ‘“no-deal will not happen whether people want it or not… Proroguing Parliament undermines parliamentary democracy and risks a general election. I rule it out and call on all candidates to do the same”

Matt Hancock again: “A policy on Brexit to prorogue Parliament would mean the end of the Conservative Party as a serious party of government.”

Amber Rudd: “I think it’s outrageous to consider proroguing Parliament. We are not Stuart kings.”

Japan has some bad, just-say-anything politicians, Aso, Mori, etc. but this is worse than them. As with Trump reducing the POTUS status to someone who pays off prostitutes and gets into childish name-calling fights, this does real damage to politics. Human beings are much much better than this.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Because 52% voted to leave to EU in 2016.

Heh, I addressed this:

The idea that the country should make a move such as this, that will affect every citizen world-wide, and all future generations, without doing another check to find out if it is what the people actually want, is simply the idea of some people who are afraid to find out that the people don't want that anymore. So they're trying to force through their own desires over the desires of the UK as a whole.

Why so afraid to find out what the populace wants now? Don't you think that's more important than what they thought in 2016?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

ohh UK, what a mess... what a mess... sighs

6 ( +6 / -0 )

I sem to remember Theresa May consistently saying "No deal is better than a bad deal" thru the last election and after.  And still the other parties couldn't get a majority.

And while I think BJ is being a bit sneaky here, it's not like Parliament has managed to decide or achieve much over the past 3 years.

Britain needs out and if this is what it takes then shoganai.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Congratulations, Great Britain, you elected yourself another trump.

A a few thousand members of the Conservative Party elected Johnson as PM, not 'Great Britain'.

Why was this thumbed down?

Have we got to the stage in this debate where we thumb down statements of fact?

How childish.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Johnson launched his boldest move yet to take the country out of the European Union by Oct 31 with or without a divorce deal

The UK was supposed to be out of the EU by the end of March.

The majority voted to leave in the referendum. What gives?

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

@kohakuebisu

I think I saw part of your comment in the Guardian :-)

2 ( +3 / -1 )

And while I think BJ is being a bit sneaky here, it's not like Parliament has managed to decide or achieve much over the past 3 years.

He’s being very sneaky.

The argument that parliament hasn’t achieved much anyway is a dangerous one. I can think of a few occasions when parliament has dithered or scrapped like kids but that doesn’t mean you should attempt to bypass it.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Yes. In which case, any of the politcal parties can feel free to campaign on a manifesto of holding another referendum to rejoin or stay out of the EU.

That's pure gamesmanship because once the UK leaves that's it.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

If the referendum was held today it would produce a different outcome.

Johnson Should have asked for a delay and then go to the country with a general election.

He has no mandate from the 2017 election manifesto to leave the EU without a deal.

His position was decided by less than 100,000 people.

When there's a change of prime minister there should also be an election to follow it has the first course of business.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Parliament has had three years to debate Brexit and yet has been unable to agree anything. 

Sounds like a good reason to put it on the back burner until some agreement can reached; or acknowledge that the whole idea is and always was ludicrous, revoke Article 50 and apologise to our EU partners for throwing a wobbly.

52% voted to leave to EU in 2016.

In an advisory referendum. A legally-binding referendum would have had much stricter safeguards, like the stipulation of minimum turnout, minimum vote, etc. Not just 'one vote more than half' to throw the country into crisis.

any of the politcal parties can feel free to campaign on a manifesto of holding another referendum to rejoin

There is no guarantee that the 27 would contemplate having a dummy-throwing UK back in its midst, and even if they did, conditions would include adoption of the Euro and no rebate. Once we're out, there is no going back - even if we go back.

The majority voted to leave in the referendum. What gives?

You seem very interested in UK politics.

The majority voted for Hillary for Prez.. What gives?

Invalid CSRF

7 ( +8 / -1 )

yep, I copied the quotes over. I'm sure LedbyDonkeys will know some choice ones too. Johnson said two weeks ago that a no-deal was a "million to one" outcome. So why is he making it happen? You don't need many brain cells to realize it's a valid question.

In better times, people in responsibility would say things and the media would hold them to account. It shows how spineless and partisan journalism is now that it barely happens. It's all about image. A good politician now is someone who simply avoids the question. It's not about principals and certainly not about details.

It is also disingenous to say "parliament" has done nothing for three years. The Theresa May government unilaterally pursued a form of Brexit that every observer said would never pass. They were her "red lines" and her deal failed because the people behind Johnson stopped it. "Parliament" had no say whatsover in the way Theresa May's people negotiated with the EU. The current impasse is the fault of the previous administration, not "parliament".

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The majority voted to leave in the referendum. What gives?

Democracy. The backstop. Legal challenges. Abuses of power. Lies.

Do you think the GFA should be put in jeopardy in order to put through a no-deal Brexit?

Leave or remain, the electorate didn't vote for a no-deal in 2016.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@CrazyJoe

The British public did not vote for a no-deal Brexit

The British people voted for an exit, that's what they expect, deal or no deal. It's too late for anti-Brexiteurs to now debate about deal or no deal.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Stop blaming the Queen, she followed long established protocols, the anti-Brexiteurs are just a bunch of sore loosers and will do anything to hold Britain back. I can't believe with the looming tariffs on EU trade and people want to keep the UK in the EU. Sado much?

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

You seem very interested in UK politics.

Trump supporters have a thing for Brexit. They think it's a great idea but are unable to articulate as to why.

This suspension is not the right way to pursue a proper Brexit, it smacks of subverting the democratic process. The democratic process is something that's very important to leavers, so I'm a bit surprised that a few of them are perfectly fine with what's happened.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Trump supporters have a thing for Brexit. They think it's a great idea but are unable to articulate as to why.

Some Trump supporters have previously written they admire Putin, and also want the EU shattered. Some are also Bannon backers. They seem to think the EU is run by a group they call 'globalists', but won't say if they're using that term the same with the Nazis did in the 1930s. All I can figure is they want a different 'faction' to run Europe, but they won't say which that would be and who would run it. This is happening while Russia is developing its Eurasian Economic Union.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

You seem very interested in UK politics.

Trump supporters have a thing for Brexit. They think it's a great idea but are unable to articulate as to why.

I get the sense they think Trump will be able to cut a great deal with a country weakened and in such a poor position to negotiate, they’ll do very well out of it. America first. This does make some sense.

The stuff about being free is just regurgitated guff.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Johnson knows Parliament will not vote through a no-deal, and he knows he cannot get any deal that is significantly different from the one already rejected. And if he did put a new deal to Parliament, again he knows he would lose. He also fears facing and losing a vote of confidence, and he fears the risk that Parliament will take action to extend the deadline again or otherwise thwart him. Finally, he fears a second referendum. So preventing Parliament from doing its job of representing the people who elected it is the only option for Johnson. Ironically holding an election pre-Brexit might also be a reasonable option for him, as the Labour party is even now trying to sit on the fence and Johnson might do quite well. An election post a no-deal Brexit is much less likely to give Johnson a victory. Johnson, Farage, Gove and all the others stressed repeatedly before the referendum that there would never be a no-deal Brexit, and yet now they say the opposite. If they can change their minds, doesn't the electorate deserve the chance to?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

"Democracy is so important. It's taught from such a young age as such a vital thing about being a British person and today just completely ruins that, tramples it and throws it out," said

.....More than three years after the United Kingdom voted 52% to 48% to quit the European Union, it is still unclear on what terms the bloc's second largest economy will leave the club it joined in 1973.

I'm not sure that some elected representatives in Parliament understand how a democracy actually works.

Voting to exit the E.U. was the result of a very democratic action undertaken by the voters of G.B.. That's what democracies do. They vote. And then they expect their elected representatives to SUPPORT the results of that democratic vote. But that's not what has happened in Parliament. Elected representatives refused to support the results of that democratic vote. For over three years elected representatives have fought against the very idea of supporting the democratically arrived at will of the people.

Now the newly selected PM has requested that the Queen suspend Parliment for several weeks, and she acquiesced to his request. And the very same elected representatives who have repeatedly refused to support the democratic vote results to leave the E.U. are now claiming that it's actually the other elected representaives who are undemocratic for actually trying to carry out the will of the voters.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Toasted Heretic - Democracy. The backstop. Legal challenges. Abuses of power. Lies.

Do you think the GFA should be put in jeopardy in order to put through a no-deal Brexit?

Leave or remain, the electorate didn't vote for a no-deal in 2016.

The majority voted to leave in the referendum. The electorate expected to leave. How G.B. left was up to it's elected representatives. Elected representatives who have repeatedly failed to make that happen. If there is a plan, or no plan, or a failure to exit, the blame falls squarely on the shoulders of those elected representatives who FAILED to support the will of the voters.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Even the Queen of England agrees with Boris Johnson to promulgate Brexit! That leaves the posters here who continually whine about Brexit looking rather foolish...

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

the blame falls squarely on the shoulders of those elected representatives who FAILED to support the will of the voters.

Johnson wasn't elected by the voters. Neither were the DUP (The latter were brought into the debacle by May).

And yet they stalled at every opportunity. The UK could have left the EU, by now.

How G.B. left was up to it's elected representatives. 

How GB left? So you agree that the majority of voters in NI have been hard done by, given they voted to remain.

Do you think the DUP were representing that majority or pushing their own agenda?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Even the Queen of England agrees with Boris Johnson to promulgate Brexit! 

She has no choice. She has zero political power. It's a formality that she goes through.

That leaves the posters here who continually whine about Brexit looking rather foolish...

I disagree. I think posters who believe that Brenda has any real power (other than decorative trimmings for whichever govt is in Number 10) might need to do a bit more research.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Taking a country that was for centuries at the center of world trade, culture and politics, and making it economically, culturally, and politically irrelevant. Cameron, May and Johnson will go down as the three worst PMs in British history.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

The problem with the monarchy head of states is,

"it's her government" "her prime minister" "her ministers" "her laws".

Time to remove the monarch from the political equation has is in Japan.

The referendum in 2016, didn't ask if the UK should leave the EU without a deal. It only asked yes or no on leaving.

In the 2017 general election there was nothing in the conservative manifesto about leaving without a deal.

There is no mandate.

It would be better for the country to delay leaving than without a deal and if Johnson was a honest man, he would call an election now!

Millions have descended on parliament in outrage and protest.

Send for the Peaky Blinders.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Send for the Peaky Blinders.

Lol! Long as it's Tommy Shelby and not Tommy Robinson ;-)

The referendum in 2016, didn't ask if the UK should leave the EU without a deal. It only asked yes or no on leaving.

In the 2017 general election there was nothing in the conservative manifesto about leaving without a deal.

There is no mandate.

Absolutely. Pushing this no-deal that was never part of the referendum is dishonest and un-democratic.

I'm not saying do another referendum, btw. Just saying do it properly and don't lie to the people in the rush to leave.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I spent my early collage years, apologies for my appalling spelling, and lack of a spell checker. Just to confirm I don't glue my opinions to formulate artwork.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@Toasted Heretic

Then you should learn more about geopolitics then!

When heads of state bow and genuflect in front of QEll, don’t you wonder why?

I don’t....

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

*the right way to pursue a *proper Brexit

There you go with oxymorons again.

Voting to exit the E.U. was the result of a very democratic action undertaken by the voters of G.B

No, it was the result of an attempt by Cameron to get UKIP off his back and Tory voters back in the fold. Democracy had little if anything to do with it.

the blame falls squarely on the shoulders of those elected representatives who FAILED to support the will of the voters.

Is it the will of the voters to scrap the GFA, put immigration and customs posts all along the EU/NI border, and fire up The Troubles again? It's certainly not the will of the voters living in Northern Ireland; they voted to remain.

When the 'will of the voters' is for unicorns and pots of gold for all, it's not the fault of the elected representatives if the unicorns and pots of gold are not forthcoming.

When heads of state bow and genuflect in front of QEll, don’t you wonder why?

I don’t....

Maybe you should. It's all show, leftovers from times when it was real. Now it's all just literally pomp and pageantry.

Invalid CSRF

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Time to remove the political power of the monarch.

She already has no political power. Even John McDonnell, an anti-monarchist, expressed sympathy for the Queen's position in this. A change to parliamentary procedure should be all that is needed to require the House of Commons rather than the government to agree to a suspension.

Parliament already has had ample time to debate the issue-years of debate-it has failed! The EU refused to debate with ex PM May and left her literally in tears!

But there has been little debate in parliament. May took it upon herself to try to reach a deal without consulting other political parties. Her "red lines" gave the EU little room for negotiation, in particular, ruling out customs union and single market options. That made an immediate no-go of some of the leave campaigners' claims that a Norway-like deal would be a great thing.

It’s hardly a coup. The voters want this.

How do we know what the voters want? Too late now, but May should have stated early on that she would seek a deal and put that to a new referendum, along with options for a no-deal or to remain.

The Speaker of the House of Commons described the government's move as a "constitutional outrage". I wonder what the reaction would have been if the Queen had used the same words.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Toasted Heretic

Then you should learn more about geopolitics then!

No need to project. You clearly don't comprehend the workings of parliament and the non-power that the monarch has.

When heads of state bow and genuflect in front of QEll, don’t you wonder why?

I don’t....

It's decorum. It doesn't mean she has any say on constitutional matters in the UK. And I believe it's curtsy, rather than genuflect. The latter is something one does in front of a Catholic church altar.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Elizabeth is worth 100s of millions of pounds-interests in the UK,Australia,Canada and New Zealand etc with creative accounting,ensure that her whole wealth cannot be accurately assessed in any one country but the ‘oh, she has no political power’ is pure rubbish!

She has title and economic might not subject to electoral checks...much better!

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Elizabeth is worth 100s of millions of pounds-interests in the UK,Australia,Canada and New Zealand etc with creative accounting,ensure that her whole wealth cannot be accurately assessed in any one country but the ‘oh, she has no political power’ is pure rubbish!

She is a ceremonial figurehead. She does not wield political power, she acts on the advice of whoever is PM.

She has title and economic might not subject to electoral checks...much better!

Her wealth has no bearing on ordinary people in Derry or Glasgow or anywhere else in the UK.

Do you honestly think she has a say on the GFA, or the backstop?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

About 60 more shopping days ...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Trump supporters have a thing for Brexit. They think it's a great idea but are unable to articulate as to why.

They don't like the EU because as an economic block it is as big as the USA and is therefore seen as a challenge to Trump's power.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

There will be a general election after the proroguement, though.

Only in case there is still a United Kingdom at that time. UK-xits could happen faster than Brexit.

The Crown is and always has been the boss! 

Not in recent history. The granny is just a puppet.

Elizabeth is worth 100s of millions of pounds

The cat of Karl Lagerfeld is worth millions too....

Elizabeth cannot say no to PM's demands as even if she tried to change one line in the speech, the micro would be cut within 10 seconds. Bojo doesn't need to ask anyone to suspend her and ground her in one of her castles. But I agree it's not a democracy when you have hereditary lords.

About 60 more shopping days ...

True. From Paris, it's a day trip to Harrods, but the pound has not crashed that much yet.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Toasted heretic:

Absolutely. Pushing this no-deal that was never part of the referendum is dishonest and un-democratic.

The referendum was on Brexit, period. Not on "hard" or "soft" Brexit (which in case of Mays so-called deal would be been a non-Brexit).

Here is an easy prediction: If the remainers are unsuccessful in their attempt to reverse the referendum and you get a "no deal brexit", it will not be the end of the world, contrary to the endless globalist propaganda we are fed by the corporate globalist media.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

If the referendum was held today it would produce a different outcome.

Maybe. And if another one is held 3 years from now, that might produce a different outcome.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

This is interesting -

Farage on why he's concerned with Boris Johnson's Brexit plan

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh1Y3TbCHQw

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Here is an easy prediction: If the remainers are unsuccessful in their attempt to reverse the referendum and you get a "no deal brexit", it will not be the end of the world, contrary to the endless globalist propaganda we are fed by the corporate globalist media.

Surely you could’ve slipped another ‘globalist’ in there and hit a hat-trick.

I haven’t read anything saying it will be Armageddon if we leave on WTO terms. Are you arguing with yourself again?

I’ve read various predictions ranging from what seem like inevitable short-term problems to wildly different predictions for the long term. Some good, some bad.

Globalists, rightists, leftists, conspiracy theorists or whoever all seem to be urinating in the wind.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Even some of PM Bozo's own cabinet ministers have been on TV opposing the shutdown, so he didn't even hold a cabinet meeting.

When the 2016 was the referendum was held very few had the knowledge and understanding that they now have after 3 years of debate.

The debate needs to continue rather than rushing to the cliff edge like lemmings.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

PM Bozo is planning to introduce a new national holiday (Bank Holiday) to further prevent MP's from stopping the no deal Brexit.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Must be a good news for Mr.Putin! The crumbling European union is good for Russia to get back those lost lands of the Soviet Union !

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The previous PM couldn't get a deal because Boris, and Parliament, wouldn't let them. Boris knows how to solve that problem.......get rid of the legitimate opposition.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Must be a good news for Mr.Putin! The crumbling European union is good for Russia to get back those lost lands of the Soviet Union !

I have heard stories about Russia's involvement in Brexit. And, once the UK leaves, and the problems (the real ones, in which the towns and hamlets were being left in the dust by capitalism 101--the same problem here in Japan) don't go away by this, who then to blame, what to do? Maybe England will put up a wall between Wales and Scotland, that might be the solution. Hah! These people are so benighted that they can't discern what is really the source of their problems and lash out and blame others. I am getting my popcorn ready for October, when the UK self-destructs, and there are lorries (trucks is the correct word, I believe) lined up at the border, the English tunnel, waiting for inspection and visas, (HA HA HA), and then these tariffs have to be levied, (HA HA HA) and then the Brits are expelled from their permanent residency status in SPAIN (HA HA HA) and so on and so on. The fun will NEVER end, and let us not get into the IRISH question. That too will be a howl. Brits can be so stupid, but the Americans are NOT far behind!!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Cameron, May and Johnson will go down as the three worst PMs in British history.

Gimme a break. None come close to Blair, who conspired to spin a web of lies to get the country embroiled in a pointless war whose devastation is still felt nearly two decades later.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@TH

Her wealth has no bearing on ordinary people in Derry or Glasgow or anywhere else in the UK.

Do you honestly think she has a say on the GFA, or the backstop?

Do you mean ‘Londonderry’ - that is the official name isn’t it?

London where the queen resides for a good part of the year, home to parliament etc.

And in Londonderry where a large number of residents will wave the Union Jack without a thought to welcome Elizabeth HRH.

And to answer your question.

Yes, I do think that the monarchy has a strong bearing on many national and international situations.

We may not see the overt influence but there is a strong covert one.

As an example of present day influence to consider, I’d suggest following the Andrew/Epstein case.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

JeffLeeToday 06:36 am JSTCameron, May and Johnson will go down as the three worst PMs in British history.

Gimme a break. None come close to Blair, who conspired to spin a web of lies to get the country embroiled in a pointless war whose devastation is still felt nearly two decades later.

OK, I said Neville Chamberlin for kissing up to Hitler. And yes, let's add 'Tony B. Liar' too. He did spin a web of lies ('sexed it up' as the US media put it) to get his country involved into a pointless war that led to nothing but more devastation and troubles - economically, socially, politically for the UK, US, Middle East and more. The instability it caused led to the rise of ISIL (remember that?) and now America is involved in 'Vietnam #2'.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good thumbnail backstory from WAPO:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2019/08/30/why-boris-johnson-is-so-eager-lock-parliament-out/

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites