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U.S. airlines warn of 'calamity' if 5G deployed near airports

32 Comments
By Daniel STUBLEN

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32 Comments
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This sounds pretty dangerous. I'm sure a two-mile radius around airports can be accommodated, right?

10 ( +10 / -0 )

5G has been on the radar (no pun intended) for many years. The airlines have been waving warning flags for years. Why wasn't this addressed years ago?

14 ( +14 / -0 )

Europe took care of this a long time ago.....Sounds like some country dropped the ball

11 ( +11 / -0 )

So they are just figuring this out. Great.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Fear mongering.

-13 ( +4 / -17 )

5G is harmful as scientists already mentioned so many time

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

Seems this problem is unique in the US

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Anyway with little info I think the answer lies with the radio filters.

Even if telcos agree and comply with additional regulations there still is the matter of the planes flying to airports of other countries.

Which leads to the question of why there seems to be no problems with the planes flying to countries already operating 5g

6 ( +6 / -0 )

5G is harmful as scientists already mentioned so many time

just like Asbestos, we might be using/eating things that will only be proven harmful in the future. Reason I still refuse to buy wireless earphones.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

5G is harmful as scientists already mentioned so many time

This is wrong, by the way.

just like Asbestos, we might be using/eating things that will only be proven harmful in the future. Reason I still refuse to buy wireless earphones.

It's because of things like asbestos that new products are today thoroughly tested to ensure that they're safe.

Sorry you've gotten your wires tangled, in more ways than one.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

The US version of 5G has frequencies closer to the bands used by airplanes altimeters then elsewhere. There is at least 200mhz separating them though. There likely is little to no risk here. Its really about passing cost. FAA vs FCC is in a fight about this.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Morons.... 5G's been out for years, Apple even sells a 5G phone, what have these guys been doing all these years?

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

But we were repeatedly and insisting told it’s nothing, harmless, healthy like any other xG. Oops…how come this urgent change of mind from?

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

But we were repeatedly and insisting told it’s nothing, harmless, healthy like any other xG. Oops…how come this urgent change of mind from?

There's nothing unhealthy about 5G. Do you think that they're worried about planes getting cancer?

8 ( +10 / -2 )

The ignorance is strong in this thread.

The airlines are at fault here.

Nothing wrong with 5G, learn to science.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

I have experienced calamity a few years ago and I do not want to experience it ever again.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The ignorance is strong in this thread.

The airlines are at fault here.

Nothing wrong with 5G, learn to science.

Just curious, why do you say the airlines are at fault?

The airlines have been operatiing all this time, why is it not the fault of those introducing the new service that could potentially knock planes out of the sky?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

The AvengerToday  12:19 pm JST

5G has been on the radar (no pun intended) for many years. The airlines have been waving warning flags for years. Why wasn't this addressed years ago?

The FCC is controlled by former telco lobbyists and lawyers. They act in the interest of the industry and abandoned the role of reigning in industry abuse. That and it simply didn't care what the FAA or pilots and airlines had to say.

They just wanted to sell the bandwidth.

The US 5G version is different than the rest of the world. It's higher power and closer to the bandwidth of radar altimeters. The industry was asked to voluntarily delay deployment to continue working on the issue, but simply refused.

The position of the airline industry is that they have been using this band for 40 years per the FCC and say the telcos need to pony up the money to have the aircraft modified.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

The US 5G version is different than the rest of the world. It's higher power and closer to the bandwidth of radar altimeters. The industry was asked to voluntarily delay deployment to continue working on the issue, but simply refused.

The position of the airline industry is that they have been using this band for 40 years per the FCC and say the telcos need to pony up the money to have the aircraft modified.

Seems the more straightforward solution would be to change US 5g standards to be similar with rest of the world. At present if the devices are activated then it will also interfere with planes from other countries.

Also, the 5g devices can't be used/sold in other countries as well.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

finally richToday  01:05 pm JST

Reason I still refuse to buy wireless earphones.

Interesting comment. Wireless earphones only receive, they don't transmit. Do you use a mobile or any kind of cordless 'phone?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Interesting comment. Wireless earphones only receive, they don't transmit.

They do transmit for pairing and keep a constant "heart beat" or "ping" to tell your device it's connected.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Cost shuffling and institutional blinkers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's possible that this is being used to restrict domestic US air travel. In Europe, governments are directly restricting domestic air travel and using Covid to limit international travel. The US has no internal flight borders, so it would need a 'Plan B' to reduce flying. This may be it. Or they were too lazy/cheap to deploy adequate filtering.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Addition: If Biden doesn't fix this, it's difficult to see him retaining any credibility.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

It's possible that this is being used to restrict domestic US air travel. In Europe, governments are directly restricting domestic air travel and using Covid to limit international travel.

Why are they trying to restrict air travel? You've got a deeper conspiracy theory in you so why don't you just spit it out?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Sounds like something that should have been ironed out far before a day before deployment

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Seems this problem is unique in the US

Other nations have prohibited 5G around their airports, which is what US airlines seek, however AT&T and Verizon will not cooperate.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The US has no internal flight borders, so it would need a 'Plan B' to reduce flying. 

The US has the same airspace restrictions as other nations have. Both coasts have ADIZ which if you enter with no flight plan and no communication with the controlling agency will get you intercepted by fighter aircraft. Same as any other ADIZ. If your airplane is coming from abroad you better have a flight clearance or you are not landing (or you might be forced by some friendly ANG F-16s to land at a military airfield and be arrested). Within the US there are restricted area for military operations. Immediately offshore are MOAs, Military Operating Areas you must have clearance for to fly through. Entering one of those without clearance will get the pilot flight violated and maybe forced down by those friendly ANG F-16 fighters. There are also Prohibited Areas where you will be shot down if you enter (example the White House or a President's home away from the White House).

But the idea that there is an official US policy to reduce air travel with all the economic and employment implications that creates is laughable. Why on Earth would the US government want to restrict air travel? To what end?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

CC & DT, I think he is referencing a reduction in their environmental impact.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So this is a problem the airlines have known about for awhile, yet didn't do much about until recently. Hmmm, reminds me of Y2K, where the problem was well-known with tech companies, yet nothing was done until a few years before zero hour.

Figures.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So this is a problem the airlines have known about for awhile, yet didn't do much about until recently. Hmmm, reminds me of Y2K, where the problem was well-known with tech companies, yet nothing was done until a few years before zero hour.

It has been well covered in the aviation and defense press for several years. There were efforts as far back as 2019 to stop the sale of that bandwidth. The DoD objected as the bandwidth overlaps GPS and will affect its accuracy. That has both civil and military ramifications. The FCC blew the DoD off and the President at the time sided with AT&T and Verizon. The FAA has even less clout in the Executive Branch than the DoD and their concerns were simply dismissed with a wave of the hand. The DoDs objections are still not addressed either except for the telephone companies to accuse the DoD of lying. This has been building for a few years now.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Considerations not being mentioned. 5G is not implemented identically around the world, just as TV and radio frequencies in other places are different from those in the US. The signal strength being proposed for use by AT&T and Verizon is much higher than that used in any other country with 5G. 5G signals in South Korea for example use about 5% of the power proposed for the US system. Nations like France impose buffers around their airports. Other nations such as Australia use different bands that are far from to those used by aircraft radar altimeters so there is no possibility of interference.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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