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As unrest sweeps Egypt, president refuses to quit

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I hope all these protesters, as well as the ones in Tunisia and Yemen beware because Islamic fundamentalists are waiting in the shadows to grab power. Al-Qaida must be loving the current turmoil.

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This is why CUBA, Venezuela etc..are also so strict against the internet, me thinks.

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CNN reported that the "Internet was down". Brainiac journalists...

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This is why CUBA, Venezuela etc..are also so strict against the internet, me thinks." One day, you'll need to come to my house when my mom is here... she'll tell you about the days in Cuba when every time the phone was picked up, it was being listened to.

This is why the gov needs to keep its hands off in terms of being able to turn it on or off

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Didn't the Pres. go to Cario and do a speech? Well I guess his words struck through and the liberty movements are flowing.

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Didn't the Pres. go to Cario and do a speech?

Actually, Condi Rice did it first.

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Actually, Condi Rice did it first.

manforamerica: you are correct. But she didn't do it as her first speech after winning an election, and promising to go there, to go there to get the feel of the muslim world to Main Street USA. But you are right she did.

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Reports coming out now say the leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood have been rounded up and arrested, yesterday and overnight I guess. Wall Street Journal says at least 20 arrests.

Let's see, there is corruption, oppression, unemployment, food price inflation, religious extremism. That is quite a mix, a possible perfect storm brewing. However it plays out today, hopefully it happens without innocent people getting hurt or killed.

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I am glad to see the people at least protesting that there is corruption in their government. I hope that they don't go to the extreme and roll back some of the gains under Mubarak.

It would be great if these countries could change leaders in peaceful means and through elections, but I guess when you live in a place with a ruling class that stamps out freedoms this will occur.

I guess Saudi Arabia is watching and getting nervous.

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I wonder how much gold the criminals will try to steal this time? How much gold can you fit into 97 suitcases?

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Rumors saying Mubarak clan has decamped to London.

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Protests,good for Egypt,it will do more good for Egypt,in the long run.

Now world knows,Egypt woes,good start to improve Egypt.

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While I agree with most sentiments here about it being good that the people of Egypt are protesting against corruption, I just can't stop the nagging doubt in the back of my mind that this may all end badly and we may just end up with a far more extreme Islamic government. I guess all we can do is support the will of the people and work with whoever is left in charge when its all over.

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I find it quite interesting that those demonstrators are seen as heroes. If this would happen in our western world,a demonstration against our sick political system, we would be seen as left extremists. In any case, good luck to them and let's just hope no extreme Islamic state will come out of it.

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Mubarak needs to retire and make way for another strongman, lol.

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I just wish them the most democratic and peaceful outcome possible. But sometimes those two things don't happen simultaneously.

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Alphabee:

" Didn't the Pres. go to Cario and do a speech? Well I guess his words struck through and the liberty movements are flowing. "

LOL! Thanks for a laugh.

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Superlib:

" I just wish them the most democratic and peaceful outcome possible. But sometimes those two things don't happen simultaneously. "

Careful what you wish for. A "most democratic" outcome in Egypt would mean the Muslim Brotherhood in power, aka another Shariah theocracy.

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What happens if AFTER this current government will be just chaos, crisis, suicide bombings,refugees...? Yes ,be careful what you wish for, indeed.

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Gosh! I want to go over to Egypt and help out our fellow democracy loving Egyptians too! Down with the bastard Mubarak!

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What if the outcome starkly contradicts the portrayal of the region, its peoples and their religion (which is inseparable from their politics) that Obama insisted on explaining to America and the world - from Cairo no less.Is there a cute, gimmicky "reset button" Hillary can push to get the media to believe the current administration has a plan?

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So President Obama gave a speech in Cairo and the unrest is all his fault? Please enlighten us and tell us what he's guilty of, encouraging democracy or endangering your favorite dictator?

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So much for the Obama agitprop that the number one issue in the region was the Israel - Palestine issue, eh.

Axelrod is lookiing like one of those 8-armed Hindu deities right now, spinning furiosly the idea that Obama has pushing Mubarak relentlessly!, for two years, not on Palestine, but on domesstic reform.

Sheriff joe Biden, meanwhile, can always be counted on to embarrass anyone foolish enough to have requested his services: "Mubarak is not a dictator!"

LOL. Obama is so flustered he told the press yesterday that combat operations have ended - in Afghanistan.

Gas prices are already responding. Fears about the region have a way of doing that.

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"So President Obama gave a speech in Cairo and the unrest is all his fault? Please enlighten us and tell us what he's guilty of, encouraging democracy or endangering your favorite dictator?"

Hour and half later, I'm still waiting for an answer from the usual anti-Obama posters. Let me sdd something snd put this in perspective: Ronald Reagon became president on Jan. 20th, 1981, Hosni Mubarak became president on Oct. 14th, 1981.

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Am I wrong in thinking this story is about Egypt? What on earth does this have to do with Obama/Bush/Biden/Reagan? Seriously, people, the various obsessions/hatreds about whatever branch of U.S. politics you believe in is becoming unhealthy for some. This story is not about U.S. politics nor is U.S. politics a significant factor in it. Is it becoming too difficult to focus our minds on the issue here..?

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Mubarack seems incapable of taking a hint.

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President Obama is actually doing well so far. Early on Hillary was hedging her bets and backing Mubarak but they have been moving away and being more supportive of the peoples right to self-determination. As for Obama's speech in Cairo, his speech follows Condi Rice's speech six years ago calling for freedom in the Middle East. Obama needs to just keep himself from showing any support for a dictator like Mubarak - and then hope like hell that the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood doesn't somehow take power - that would be a disaster.

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It is unlikely that the Muslim Brotherhood would take power in Egypt; they lack support both from secular opposition groups and the governments of the wider region. They've stood as independent candidates in the past and not received a large share of the vote. Mostly, Mubarak has used the spectre of the Brotherhood seizing power to stay in office.

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So President Obama gave a speech in Cairo and the unrest is all his fault? Please enlighten us and tell us what he's guilty of, encouraging democracy or endangering your favorite dictator?

Propping up this dictatorial regime, that's what!

The reason the Egyptians have not had democracy (ya know, that thing that the USA stands for) is because American imperialism has been backing dictators for too long.

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"Propping up this dictatorial regime, that's what!"

AuntyAmerican; Mubarak in office 30 years. Obama in office 2 years.

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Murbarak is the alike the Shah in 1979 and the arbs world wasnt the only egypt was corrupted and useless, there were a list of these countries. I wonder uncle Beloucciconi,maybe he is next!

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Those frustration of Murbarak was just 'tip of an iceberg' the whole picture is anti-US presents in middleeast'! Like the British in Egypt, america draws more resentment from the arabs world!

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AuntyAmerican; Mubarak in office 30 years. Obama in office 2 years.

AuntyAmerican was referring to American imperialism, not just Obama.

Obama is just a puppet, nothing has changed since he got in. The US is responsible for keeping this dictator in power.

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"Let me sdd something snd put this in perspective: Ronald Reagon became president on Jan. 20th, 1981, Hosni Mubarak became president on Oct. 14th, 1981."

Meaningless correlation. Sadat was assassinated by the Islamists. Mubarak succeeded him.He had been his vp since 76.

"This story is not about U.S. politics nor is U.S. politics a significant factor in it. "

The Telegraph claims that the US is supporting the opposition.

And like I said above the price of oil will be affected by the outcomes in Egypt, Tunisia and the other over-populated under-developed nations in the region we see trying to work out their conflicting desires to have the best of the modern world while clinging to the medieval delusions and comforts Mohammedism holds for them.

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"So President Obama gave a speech in Cairo and the unrest is all his fault? Please enlighten us and tell us what he's guilty of, encouraging democracy or endangering your favorite dictator?"

I don't think Mubarak is encouraging democracy, and Obama is not my favorite dictator. If I had to choose a favorite from the category I suppose it would be Ataturk.

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what if?

What if they demand a return to monarchy?

King Faud II is alive and in Switzerland...

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The reason the Egyptians have not had democracy (ya know, that thing that the USA stands for) is because American imperialism has been backing dictators for too long.

Where was the left when their was a democracy movement in Iran a year ago? Everyone seemed to keep quiet then. Also, where was the left and all those pundits on places like MSNBC when the coptic (i.e. Christian) churches were being burned in Egypt a few months ago.

If Mubarak does fall, and whatever form of government fills in (I am leaning towards the Muslim Brotherhood type) and they control that end of the Red Sea/Suez Canal, and Yemen falls at the other end, get ready for sky high gas prices since the Suez Canal will be cut off.

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Alphaape:

" If Mubarak does fall, and whatever form of government fills in (I am leaning towards the Muslim Brotherhood type) and they control that end of the Red Sea/Suez Canal, and Yemen falls at the other end, get ready for sky high gas prices since the Suez Canal will be cut off. "

It is likely that Mubarak does fall, and it is likely that Muslim Brotherhood will take over. I agree with that. But I don´t think they will cut off the Suez Kanal. Their priorites will be change Egypts secular structures into a brutal Sharia state. Expect a genocide for Egypts Copt minority, and expect that the peace treaty with Israel will be revoked. With Egypt in Muslim Brotherhood hands, Israel will have another power enemy who will work to destroy the Jewish state.

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Most of these people are revolting because of the food situation (50% on food stamps/gov handouts) = the rising food costs and Gov cut-backs (austerity) have caused them to get active. Look at the Al Jeezera footage = this people are thin in body but big at heart.

Suez has probably the worst fighting and will have the highest fighting death rate. Biggest asset in country = target for outsiders to control. I don't see the US having enough power over these people to set up another Saudi Arabia "sharia state" and in fact you may see people trying to revolt in Saudia Arabia also. --> This is not a pro-Sharia issue.

Al Jazeera has the best news people for something like this. =They are #1 in this area of the world by far and are independent.

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Early election,free and fair elections,with plenty of appeasing reforms ,needed in Egypt.

They need to appease,the people power protestors.

More investment/loans from other nations,could help make jobs and make economy more better.

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Obama needs to just keep himself from showing any support for a dictator like Mubarak -

I think it's too late for that. After all, he did go to Egypt and delivered a speech in Cairo, and Mubarak was still in problem and Obama called him and Egypt a strong ally. Now that things have gotten too hot, he wants to distance himself and the US.

I hate to say this, but the US can't have it both ways. As many have said in the past about Bush and his war against Saddam, yes he was an ally of the US, but then we just shifte allegance and many on the left threw a fit. It looks like it's just politics as normal for the US, and this sends a message to all of our allies. If things get too tough, we will cut and run.

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Unrest in Egypt: What’s going on? By Zachary Roth

Michele Dunne is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for Peace. She has served as a specialist on Middle East affairs with the White House and the State Department, and has written widely on Arab politics, and political and economic reform. The Lookout asked her to explain what's going on in Egypt, and what it means for America.

LOOKOUT: What are the protesters angry about, and what do they want done?

M.D.: Protesters have a large number of economic, political, and human-rights grievances. Widespread youth unemployment, rigged parliamentary elections in November 2010, and the prospect of President Mubarak (in power since 1981) beginning another term--or being replaced by his son--are the sparks that set these demonstrations off. The demonstrators are asking for Mubarak to step down and make way for an interim government to prepare for free elections.

LOOKOUT: How might a shift in power affect U.S. interests?

M.D.: U.S. interests are being challenged here. The United States has been tepid in supporting human rights and democracy in Egypt for years and has to deal with the resentment among Egyptians because of that.

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I hate to say this, but the US can't have it both ways.

Why do you 'Hate to say this...'? The USA has backed Egypt to the tune of $1.5Bn every year including military training and equipment. That's $1.5BN to prop up an authoritarian, non-democratic, torturing regime.

Arabs are rebelling not just against decrepit autocrats but the foreign backers who kept them in power

Now hear Americans complain of the Muslim brotherhood gaining power - they wont, but it suits the USA to now attempt to instil fear of what the outcome might be. The Muslim brotherhood is only strong, as is Hamas, because of the years of corruption in these Arab states - fully supported by American Dollars and military.

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"Hosni Mubarak"

How many U.S. tax dollars have been sucked up by Egypt during this guy's rule?

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"How many U.S. tax dollars have been sucked up by Egypt during this guy's rule?"

A lot. Egypt is the second largest recipient of American aid after Israel. It's been that way ever since Egypt recognized Israel. A democratically elected government, in contrast to the Mubarak regime, wouldn't necessarily do that despite the cash pay-off. In a nutshell: US geopolitical interest collide here with support for "freedom."

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The Muslim brotherhood is only strong, as is Hamas, because of the years of corruption in these Arab states - fully supported by American Dollars and military.

The Muslim brotherhood is strong partially because the US poured huge amounts of direct aid into anti-Marxist/anti Third World nationalist Islamic extremists during the Cold War which inadvertently positioned those very same extremists to become our next great enemy. The actions of the US during the Cold War helped to create Al Queda, Hamas, Hezbollah, the Taliban, and various other Muslim fundamentalist groups both local and international.

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How many U.S. tax dollars have been sucked up by Egypt during this guy's rule?

Sucked up!? They were very willingly donated in the interests of regioal stability.

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So it looks like people are sifting through the information and aligning whatever pieces they need to attack whichever party they have the biggest gripe against. Business as usual.

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"As many have said in the past about Bush and his war against Saddam, yes he was an ally of the US, but then we just shifte allegance and many on the left threw a fit."

What "the left" objected to was the justification used to topple Saddam: he was a ruthless dictator who murdered his own people. Yeah, but he'd done it while as ally of the US and we looked the other way because it was in our geopolitical interests to support him. When those interests changed, we conveniently forgot our earlier support for the guy.

'[T]his sends a message to all of our allies. If things get too tough, we will cut and run." Things are tough because Mubarak's own people are rising up against him. So you're saying we should support repressive measures against a "people power" revolution of the type that swept Ferdinand Marcos from power?

Mubarak has been grooming his son to succeed him. He knows what awaits most dictators in retirement: there's already a warrant out for Tunisia's Ben Ali's arrest.

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When there was a rebellion by moderates against the mullahs in Iran, the Potus sided with the mullahs.

Now that the secular regime in Egypt is being topped and the Muslim Brotherhood gets ready to take power, guess who Barack Hussein and Hillary side with.... yep, the islamists.

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In good old American fashion. US has long traditions supporting fascist corrupt dictators like Mubarak. And not democratic movements. USA who like to babble about democracy and human rights, should stop supporting and aiding decadent and repressive regimes. Human rights organizations have long complained about the lack of freedom and the gross human right abuses carried out in Egypt with the full knowledge and support of USA. If US is to respect democracy and freedom they should put their money where the mouth is.

Mubarak is like Marcos or Pinochet in Chile. Greedy corrupt thuggish dictators. USA´s favorite type of politicians.

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"In good old American fashion. US has long traditions supporting fascist corrupt dictators like Mubarak. And not democratic movements"

Lets face it ppl like u would criticize the US no matter what. If we don't 'support' a country we are accused of negligence or indiffernece to the suffering of the third world. If we do are made the scapegoat for all the shortcomings of countryX or the depredations of its dictator /presidente for Life .

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@SolidariTea

You are giving US too much credit. If US wants to be a respectable nation all it needs to do is to stop bribing fascist dictators and racist governments and embrace democracy and solidarity with it´s people.

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Mubarak is like Marcos or Pinochet in Chile. Greedy corrupt thuggish dictators. USA´s favorite type of politicians.

I would not say favorite type. However, the US is very much in to realpolitik. They prefer good guys, but if none are available, we'll take someone who agrees to be on "our" side, despite the serious flaws they have. Most of that is a holdover from the cold war where the absolute enemy was anyone aligned with the soviets and so dubious characters were supported in lieu of democracy when none was available.

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"You are giving US too much credit. If US wants to be a respectable nation all it needs to do is to stop bribing fascist dictators and racist governments and embrace democracy and solidarity with it´s people."

The US sided WITH Egypt and against the colonial powers of France and Britain in the Suez crisis. Eisenhower - yeah, an old white dude - was president. History did not start with the late 1960s , where u probably get your world view from...

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Salvador Allende was a democratic elected leader who was then overthrown by a US backed military coup, instead of actually embracing and supporting democracy US did just the opposite by supporting and aiding a brutal fascist dictator. This is what US always has been doing and keeps doing. They will come with various reasons in order to not support democracy. Now for some comddy coming out of the White House. USA´s latest outburst.

Mubarak has been an ally of ours in a number of things. I would not refer to him as a dictator

I hope Americans have a good sense of self irony. Would also like to ask, how Americans define "dictator"? USA needs to embrace freedom and democracy. 2 core values which shouldn´t be difficult for Americans to embrace.

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Allende? Egypt ? I fail to see any coneection. The Mid east is not South America.

"I hope Americans have a good sense of self irony"

Why? You lost yours?_

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events conspiring to make Obama look like a Jimmy Carter.

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@SolidariTea

Is Mubarak a dictator or not? You are an American. Please amuse me.

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Mubarak's sons, including the one he was grooming to be next leader, have fled the country, but not to America.

They have landed in London.

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Hmm, things must be just about over for Mubarak. Exile coming up...

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The whole world sees the US for what it really is, and so do some of it's people that aren't easily persuaded by propaganda (even though they don't like to admit it). I think Japan and the US have one thing in common, their citizens embrace the expression "shouganai".

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