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Wuhan's wet markets struggle after virus lockdown

29 Comments
By Jing Xuan TENG

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© 2020 AFP

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29 Comments
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Good.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Good.

You beat me to it!

8 ( +10 / -2 )

The guy in the middle, not much use wearing a mask like that! Just like some of the people here in Japan.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Wet markets must be shut down, humans must obtain their food in a more humane way, or we will continue to pay the price. This would do the rest of the beings in the world a gigantic favor; it's just a shame that conscientious people will go down with those complicit. Truthfully, factory farms in this country and elsewhere are barely better, often cruel beyond belief, and the food is contaminated and unhealthy. Yet the vast majority of people still aid and abet cruelty with their purchases, not seeking humane alternatives.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

wet markets are just so.....misunderstood.

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/04/14/asia/china-wet-market-coronavirus-intl-hnk/index.html

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

These wet markets that sell exotic live animals for food or fresh kills are not hygienic and in most developed nations they would not be allowed. So either china wants to be part of the modern developed world or not?

China can not be forgiven so easily.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Back in the day it may have been fine when it was the hermit kingdom and made in China viruses stayed there. No, however, the world is too interlinked to allow such a biologically dangerous practice to continue in a "developed" country.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

'Fresh' and 'hygienic' are not the same thing.

I've seen similar markets in China, and they're nasty. Even the 'fresh animal sections' in supermarkets there are nasty and harrowing (frogs, lizzards, snakes, fish in very tight containers, suffocating, injured, battling to get out) . Then again piles of raw meat and e.g.chicken legs without containers, in the warm open air, in supermarkets. How exactly is even that hygienic? Fresh yes, hygienic, no.

For me, these markets and supermarket sections are a huge problem foremost for the reason of animal welfare; the absolute lack of it.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It's starting to be taken seriously now that the virus "actually did" get released out of a Lab in Wuhan and the wet market thing was just a cover up. You're busted China!

Actually both are plausible.

1) It could have been a developing bioweapon, so the CCP could remove unwanted ethnicities like in the Western regions, get a foothold in strategic countries for geopolitical reasons, or defeat countries that China doesn't want to engage in a direct conflict.

2) Unsanitary conditions for processing live animals for consumption created the idea environment for a super virus to develop naturally.

The former makes CCP government look worse in the eyes of the Chinese people and international community.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

wasn't tsukiji one big "wet market?" the difference is cleanliness. china is ten million light years away from being a clean country. even their major cities are glossed over cesspools of uncleanliness.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The lack of cleanliness at markets may explain why Chinese food is often fried and heavily spiced, as opposed to Japanese food which often includes raw fish and subtle tastes. In the US you can imagine why we have chili. Out on the range you needed to eat whatever was available and spice the heck out of it.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Nice try China. The PR move is far too late. Everyone knows that within a year or so, the wet markets (or whatever they referred to) will be back. The demand for 'freshness' supercedes a concern for health.

Moreover, interesting how this article came about. I thought China had kicked out all the U.S. reporters? Alas, China is trying to 'show' how they've cleaned up their act (ha, ha, ha!).

Kind of like how China is 'trying' to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. Rather, they are reducing the annual INCREASE in their annual emissions. So, instead of polluting at 70 kph, they are now polluting at 50 kph, but still increasing the overall output of emissions.

CCP, no one trusts you.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

However, China has been the source of numerous epidemics throughout history.

Grant and I’m reading Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year (1722 on London 1665). That is only circumstantial evidence; you might be able to trace the Bubonic Plague to China. Not denying the possibilities of the wet market but making a case to look into the Institute of Virology. Among the initial infected in Wuhan, some had connections with the seafood market but others had no connections at all.

If the US is responsible enough to shut down the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, in Fort Detrick, Md due to safety concerns, shouldn’t China be held accountable for its negligence in accidents of the lab in Wuhan?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Just shut them down. They’re a disgrace and the cause of all the crap happening in the world today. Oh the poor things are struggling with business?

Good. Struggle.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@quercetum

Grant and I’m reading Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year (1722 on London 1665). That is only circumstantial evidence; you might be able to trace the Bubonic Plague to China. Not denying the possibilities of the wet market but making a case to look into the Institute of Virology. Among the initial infected in Wuhan, some had connections with the seafood market but others had no connections at all.

From an article published in 2010, the Great Plague, lasting from 1665 to 1666, was the last major epidemic of the bubonic plague to occur in England. It happened within the centuries-long Second Pandemic, a period of intermittent bubonic plague epidemics which originated in China in 1331, the first year of the Black Death, an outbreak which included other forms such as pneumonic plague, and lasted until 1750.

Haensch, Stephanie; et al. (2010), "Distinct Clones of Yersinia pestis Caused the Black Death", PLoS Pathogens6 (10): e1001134, doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1001134, PMC 2951374, PMID 20949072

This may be true! However, China has been the source of numerous epidemics throughout history.

1) Asian flu

2) Hong Kong Flu

3) Bird flu

4) SARS

5) Wuhan virus

*What's known as the Great Plague (Black Death) of London actually started in China in 1334 and spread along trade routes (Silk Road), wiping out entire towns. Florence, Italy, lost a third of its 90,000 residents in the first six months. Overall, Europe lost 25 million people.***

DEADLY DISEASES: Epidemics throughout History

https://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2014/10/health/epidemics-through-history/

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It IS unfathomable that they were allowed to reopen, but I guess it should be more unfathomable that there is any demand. We are doomed as a species.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Chances are that the coronavirus originated in bats, and that one of the animals in this market had been infected by a bite, developed a virus, and it spread. Question of allowing these markets to continue in business aside, it's best to avoid eating any sort of mammal, no matter where it came from.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The top medical specialist for the U.S. government, Anthony Fauci, told Fox News

The nationalistic state-run Global Times

https://twitter.com/tomgauld/status/571994690289061888

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Numan

Thanks for the links. My point is that what you’ve raised only establishes the source being in China 1331. That’s it. Where is the “wildlife” in this equation? And your point is that there have been epidemics in China.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

sanctions on China until the CCP ends ALL wet markets NOW!!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Chances are that the coronavirus originated in bats, and that one of the animals in this market had been infected by a bite, developed a virus, and it spread. Question of allowing these markets to continue in business aside, it's best to avoid eating any sort of mammal, no matter where it came from.

Its possible. We don’t even know if they sell bats in that seafood market. Does anyone? All we have is that it’s nasty and dirty.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Bats should be banned. Too dangerous. Ducks should. be closely regualted.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Go vegan!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Let’s hope this is the end of a vile custom.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Diffrent names for the virus

Covad-19

Wuhan virus

China virus

Dont eat bats virus

https://www.ibtimes.sg/watch-this-woman-eating-bat-fancy-wuhan-restaurant-ignoring-uproar-over-natural-hosts-coronavirus-38197

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Dude with the chin mask/cigarette combo doesn’t look like a paragon of good hygiene.

The manspreader scratching his nose doesn’t inspire confidence either.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Yeah, the 'food' is fresh because the animal is alive but freshness is irrelevant if the animal has a disease. Haven't we just learnt that the very hard way?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@queretum

Thanks for the links. My point is that what you’ve raised only establishes the source being in China 1331. That’s it. Where is the “wildlife” in this equation?

Are you saying that the Bubonic plague has no animal factor? You think that it was developed in a lab in 1331? Was it not spread through fleas and rats?

Is that not the animal factor that allowed it to reach town to town all the way to Europe?

I never said a wet market is the source of the Bubonic plague. No one has said that.

Everyone has said that unsanitary conditions around animals increases the chances of spreading viruses.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Like I said before, both situations are plausible.

1) From a lab - From the lab after worker was exposed in the lab where animals were being tested with virus, that worker shopped in the markets and infected others.

2) From highly unsanitary environment like those wet markets -The animals being used in the lab to test the coronavirus were sold to the Wet market after testing and death.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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