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Describing a real possibility based on scientific studies is not fear mongering, people can make better decisions thanks to that, the only ones in fear are those that systematically reject science and any knowledge that threatens the way they need reality to be.

Textbook fearmongering,

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/fearmongering

What kind of better decisions would these people hypothetically make? You leave out that detail in place of a broad generalization.

Here's a tip---if you see a sandstorm brewing outside, stay in.

Posted in: Sandstorms pose serious risk to human health See in context

In spite of the effects Covid has on society, as any medical professional would know. As usual, you provide no statistical data to support your "claims".

Articles here where you have commented have made it the sole point of discussion the policy negative effects on their economy, pretending not to know these sources do not work when they contain your participation.

New Zealand, which copied China's zero covid policy at the start of the crisis, went into a recession

Thus proving the policy is bad for the economy, a perfect contradiction of your postion.

And when it eased restrictions, its infections and related deaths zoomed to some of the highest rates in the world, while China was the lowest.

That never happened, the one that went to the highest rates in the world was Hong Kong, which obviously is in China and became overnight one of the places with the highest death rates, does this mean China abandoned the zero covid policy?

Last year, China had the biggest growth in GDP since 1992. China is doing fine, despite your ant-facts denials

The point is that an unnecessary policy is detrimental to China, and other countries have done better with even lower death rates without needing it. That means keeping with a bad policy even if it is not efficient and even if better options are available.

Posted in: Dazzling but empty stadiums a symbol of China's fading soccer dream See in context

Wrong.

The question is about the root cause of a failing immune system. Not about pathogens "adapting."

That is the point, there is no "failing" of the immune system, there is infection, which is a natural process product from the adaptation of the pathogens.

One of the root causes of the failing immune system is the ability of white blood (phagocytes, and lymphocytes) cells to be active enough to either produce enzymes to fight off pathogens, or to produce antibodies to basically slow down pathogens so that phagocytes can destroy the pathogens.

Something that do not apply at all for the outbreak of monkeypox because it does not require any kind of failing of the immune system, it can infect normal, healthy people.

Posted in: Scientists baffled by monkeypox cases in Europe, U.S. See in context

Are they sure it wasn't a flip phone?

Posted in: Man arrested for threatening schoolgirl with knife See in context

Those tires are pretty ugly.

Beauty is as beauty does. For a time when there were still some new homes being built around where I live we called one street "Puncture Place" and stayed off it. It seemed every time we used that street we would end up with a flat tire. Plus having to drag the compressor out every two weeks or so to air up tires is a chore.

Posted in: Manufacturers getting to grips with airless tires See in context

BroncoMay 21  05:10 pm JST

What is the root cause of the immune system failing which then allows the virus to take hold?

Good question.

The same cause as in every infection, pathogens are adapted to defeat the immunity.

Wrong.

The question is about the root cause of a failing immune system. Not about pathogens "adapting."

One of the root causes of the failing immune system is the ability of white blood (phagocytes, and lymphocytes) cells to be active enough to either produce enzymes to fight off pathogens, or to produce antibodies to basically slow down pathogens so that phagocytes can destroy the pathogens.

Of course, things like age, medications and so forth can weaken the immune system and inhibit the white blood cells activity.

Experts have stressed they do not know if the disease is being spread through sex or other close contact related to sex.

Some do know.

Posted in: Scientists baffled by monkeypox cases in Europe, U.S. See in context

In my mind, people should be free, but as for democracy, each person usually gets a vote. Not different rules for different people.

Who represents the interests of Aboriginal communities in the Australian Parliament? White members who's districts overlap Aboriginal lands. But their constituencies are mostly non Aboriginal and because of this the needs of Aboriginal communities are drown out by louder voices of a the non Aboriginal majority. Are there majority Aboriginal Parliament districts in Australia? None that I am aware of. They effectively have no representation.

Posted in: Australian PM-elect Albanese says Quad meeting in Tokyo 'absolute priority' See in context

Not without China.

What are your loyalties? Why do you always cheer lead China?

Posted in: Australian PM-elect Albanese says Quad meeting in Tokyo 'absolute priority' See in context

You've got me there. I've no idea. But is it a case of the immune system failing or simply not existing for certain people in regard to certain diseases? We're not all the same

I doubt what we are seeing is any kind of failure of the immune system. If you consider the many billions of times a pathogen like Monkeypox reproduces itself each year, the chance that every reproductive event goes perfectly is essentially zero. There will be mutations and defects in some instances. In most cases these defects and mutations do not give the pathogen any advantage, some will even worsen its ability to survive and reproduce, and the mutation dies off quickly. Other times a mutation is neutral, neither harming or helping survival and that mutation continues to turn up from time to time. But once in a while there will be a mutation that gives the pathogen an edge over its un-mutated cousins in terms of survival or ability to reproduce. In addition there can be cases where there is a change in the pathogen's environment, say the introduction of antibiotics or anti-viral drugs and one finds that a previously neutral mutation floating around in the gene pool endows the holders of that mutation an advantage in this newly altered environment. An example would be a white bear in an oak woodland would not be a good thing. But throw in an ice age and suddenly being a white bear has a major survival advantage over brown and black bears. I think we are experiencing something similar here, but genetically sequencing samples of the virus taken from current patients will determine if there was a survival enhancing change in the virus samples taken from sufferers.

Posted in: Scientists baffled by monkeypox cases in Europe, U.S. See in context

Unfortunately this possibility is what can make developed countries actually try and do something about it,

Dude, developed nations like the US have had big sandstorms like this since they were founded. It is part of life in the desert. Places like Phoenix Arizona get smothered by massive "Haboobs" with some frequency. My insurance just repainted and replaced most of the windows and headlights on our van after it was sandblasted in a desert sand storm so bad we were down to about 40 kph creeping along in low visibility while you could hear the rocks cracking off the sides of the van and the windows. In the first 25 km we saw four big semi trailers and two fifth wheel travel trailers blown over. Further down the road another two semis and four more contractor or personal travel trailers were flipped over by the wind. The dirt gets in your nose and mouth. Even with windows and doors closed it finds ways to get into your home and piles up in little dunes. Annoyingly if manages to get into the air conditioning of the car so when the fan is on it's blowing sand out of the dashboard vents. If you can, you stay indoors because everyone out here knows breathing that stuff isn't healthy but that day we had no choice. You have to have a hard shell like a Desert Tortoise to thrive in the desert. But sandstorms are as old as the desert.

Posted in: Sandstorms pose serious risk to human health See in context

I have been to a number of displays, both in Japan and New Zealand.

I get goosebumps every time.

Posted in: 'Straight to your soul': Japan's taiko reinvents drum tradition See in context

As we don't show off money to the public, If we don't want to have the money stolen. Women shouldn't wear such bathing suits. No men asked to wear such bathing suits. That's true to everyday life. Women always figure out what appeals to men. thats why women wear clothes to show off their legs and body. then they are satisfied with that. If they dont want to be a victim of sexism, they should cover their body and face as much as possible like Taliban controlled Afghanistan.

Posted in: Ex-Olympic medalist Kotani battles objectification of women in sport See in context

Killing a fellow human for convince, economic or otherwise is wrong and imoral period.

Keeping the elderly healthy, safe, comfortable and pain free should be the focus and compared the the USA Japan does a much better job at it in my opinion.

As countries like Japan and the USA spend billions of dollars helping others throughout the world I can only help to think our priorities are skewed and much of that money would be better spent taking care of its own citizens. Just my thoughts.

Posted in: Kill Japan's elderly? Cannes film probes chilling idea See in context

There's no hand-over period? Two days after the election and he's sworn in? That seems crazy for the leader of a country. Wouldn't a month be needed to get things in order and move?

I still like Albanese Gummy bear candy. ;)

Posted in: Albanese sworn in as PM in Australia ahead of Tokyo Quad summit See in context

You are the one saying that professionals are able to know their institutions are wrong but keep quiet even if that puts their family and friends in danger by doing it.

Never said that. You just keep throwing strawmans left and right, instead of actually engaging in the points I said or asking for clarification if you are not sure what I said.

Professionals ARE talking about these things, there are discussions happening RIGHT NOW, like that fact that the

Posted in: If the current inoculation rate continues, we’ll have no choice but to dispose of some of the vaccine. See in context

The police respond quickly in this country.

Posted in: Man arrested for threatening schoolgirl with knife See in context

NFTs were the ultimate (and perhaps most ephemeral) tech bubble. So many fakes were produced (not sold by the owner of the original), so quickly, that you had to get in and out really early to bank a profit.

Crypto will rise and fall according to market sentiment, eventually collapsing when it gets criminalised by governments.

Stablecoins are only stable if they are pegged to a reliable real world currency. A 'Stablecoin' pegged to crypto is not a Stablecoin - it is a crypto proxy.

Deglobalisation, nationalism and the inevitable consequences, will hammer the global economy. Although most finance (stocks/crypto) has an element of artificial value and can function as if detached from reality, it will hit the wall at some point.

Whatever your money is in, make sure you are able to cash out very quickly when reality hits home.

Posted in: 'Enormously risky': How NFTs lost their luster See in context

Maybe not be so sensitive about people looking at pictures of someone competing as an "artistic swimmer".

Posted in: Ex-Olympic medalist Kotani battles objectification of women in sport See in context

Ban photos completely at the competition and use artists just like in courtrooms. Problem solved!

Posted in: Ex-Olympic medalist Kotani battles objectification of women in sport See in context

Can’t say, how often. I am too lazy and also see no reason for counting that. lol

Posted in: How often do you wear face masks? See in context

Ah... so China is now "Afraid" hence it's sudden backlash... good.

Posted in: China slams U.S. Asia strategy as Biden visits S Korea, Japan See in context

Bob FosseToday  02:14 pm JST

At least Australians aren’t crying fake election. Still complaining but at least accepting.

Credit to the Aussies for holding a valid election.

Posted in: Albanese sworn in as PM in Australia ahead of Tokyo Quad summit See in context

how about the politicians give up their privilege of dining out at our expense

I ‘admire’ those senseless proposals. Just think about it for a minute or two. They can set their income in parliament votings and decisions and all of it is then paid by the taxpayers, like in all democracies. Now tell me where the difference is, if they go out dining from that money just the way they do it like now, or if they instead raise their self-set income by the amount of restaurant costs and then pay it officially and separately and with printed receipts, but now from their income, that has been increased by the restaurant costs. A little hint, there’s no difference at the end, and again the taxpayers pay everything and minimum the same as before of course (in fact even more, because you now even have more bureaucracy efforts and costs to check and manage all those payments and receipts). You see, that will turn out an own goal, so to say.

Posted in: Private-initiative soup kitchens spring up to deal with child poverty See in context

"Elvis", which premieres on Wednesday, stars newcomer Austin Butler in the lead role and Tom Hanks as his infamous manager, Colonel Tom Parker.

Not enthralled with Tom Hanks in this role.

Posted in: Elvis' granddaughter says watching new biopic 'very intense' See in context

I do when in the supermarket or a crowded place, which I try to avoid. I’m old and have lung issues and have managed to not get Covid.

I’m usually the only one not wearing a mask wherever I go where I live. Masks were dropped last year.

I had one snarling woman ask me in the supermarket why I was still wearing a mask. I told her it was a reminder for people to mind their own business.

Posted in: How often do you wear face masks? See in context

Inclusion of the self-ruled island of Taiwan, which China claims as its own, would have irked Beijing.

Hilarious! Don't want to irk China now, do we?

https://japantoday.com/category/politics/Biden-says-U.S.-would-respond-militarily-if-China-invades-Taiwan-announces-IPEF-members

More Biden bungling on this issue.

Posted in: Taiwan not included in launch of new Biden Indo-Pacific pact See in context

Well, this thread didn’t age well. Nobody backpedaling off the bandwagon though.

Nevermind, there’ll be something else to fire them up tomorrow.

Posted in: Taiwan not included in launch of new Biden Indo-Pacific pact See in context

Thiem isn't the only one out. Our dear Naomi is out too, in the first round. Now, she's thinking of skipping Wimbledon because there are no ranking points on offer thanks to Wimbledon's idiotic cancel culture. How convenient. No doubt we'll read more of this on JT tomorrow.

Posted in: Thiem out of sync, out of French Open with 10th loss in row See in context

Nice try, but a stronger American beat her today.

Get ready for Wimbledon.

Posted in: Naomi Osaka at French Open news conference: 'I think I'm OK' See in context

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