Abbeyroad45 comments

Posted in: Many Japanese companies are reluctant to hire even highly skilled foreigners because of fears that their local staff aren’t ready for colleagues from abroad. This is deterring foreign talent: In one recent survey, Japan was ranked the least attractive place to work in Asia. As countries from Taiwan to South Korea to Singapore — and even China — look abroad for labor, Japan needs to change its thinking. See in context

@Arrrgh-Type

Yes, exactly. I saw Chinese colleagues treated like garbage by people who had always treated me well. And Vietnamese were treated even worse. I’d say this fear is correct: many people are not willing to put aside their stereotypes of Chinese and other Asians long enough to work with them in a civil manner.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Posted in: Local governments struggling to secure childcare workers See in context

Good childcare workers are worth their weight in gold. I would happily pay more for my children’s care if it were to support higher salaries for the teachers. I am extremely grateful for everything they do for our family.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Final season of 'Game of Thrones' to premiere in April See in context

Yes, I can’t wait!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Trump says Japan treats U.S. unfairly on trade by not taking more American cars See in context

US automakers have said repeatedly that it’s not worth the cost to set up the dealer and service network that would be required to sell their cars competitively in Japan. Niche auto makers like Porsche, etc. have found it a worthwhile investment because their cars sell for much higher prices. But most people aren’t going to be willing to pay a much higher price for the same level of car with less service and support. So the manufacturers either have to go all in on setting up the sales and service network and just eat the costs while they try to market their cars, or they can just skip Japan and aim for less saturated markets that don’t have as high of service demands.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Posted in: Here today, ghosting tomorrow — workers just disappear See in context

This is pretty common at “black” companies. My husband used to work for one where this happened regularly. People would agree to start the job and then just never show up, or they would call out sick one day and never come back. But it’s understandable considering the way some employers treat people trying to leave. I worked for two different companies where the boss would try to browbeat and bully people into staying when they handed in their letter of resignation. No idea why they thought that would work, but I think they were just so used to bullying employees that they didn’t know how to turn it off.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Alan Alda to get lifetime achievement award See in context

Congratulations to one of my favorite actors!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Posted in: Rubella infection spikes in Japan See in context

Immunity for many vaccines only lasts around 30 years or so. Generally this is enough to get over childhood when the diseases are most dangerous, but with people having children later, lack of immunity to rubella can be a risk for pregnant women.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Posted in: Del Potro, Nadal, Serena win quarterfinals at U.S. Open; Stephens ousted See in context

Serena!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Serena Williams to face Kerber in her 10th Wimbledon final See in context

Yes! I love Serena, such incredible talent and such a pleasure to watch.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Police officer shot dead in koban; 19-year-old colleague arrested See in context

The police academy training is one year. This officer would have just graduated and be new to the job. The police academies have two courses: one for people who have graduated high school and one for people who have graduated from university. The high school graduates become patrol officers and the university graduates become detectives, etc. So yes, a 19-year old armed officer is nothing unusual.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Posted in: Man arrested for assaulting truck driver after tailgating him on expressway See in context

Had somebody try to do this to me once, but I saw him coming and locked my doors. He pounded on the windows and screamed for a while, but he ran away when he saw me dialing the police.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Trump says DACA deal for young immigrants is off See in context

He’s just tweeting garbage. Garbage in, garbage out. I wish people would stop getting so worked up about a senile old man tweeting about the garbage TV he watches, then maybe he would stop doing it. Until the constitution is amended to allow legislation by tweet, there is no point in everybody freaking out about the stream of consciousness live blog on Twitter.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Posted in: Criminal charge dropped against driver arrested for fatally hitting 2-year-old boy See in context

I remember this story, the boy was crossing a 4 lane road at night by himself because his grandparents lived on one side and parents on the other. It’s a busy road leading up to a highway, but it sounded like the family regularly let the boy cross by himself.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Family strife, threats preceded Texas church massacre by former U.S. airman See in context

These people always give many warning signs and red flags before these things happen. It’s not like he woke up one day and was like hm I think I’ll kill people. That’s why all the handwringing about “evil” is so useless. It’s just a dodge to avoid doing anything. The truth is there were probably many opportunities along the way to stop this, either with mental health support or gun control or both, but pretending it’s “evil” and not part of the human condition is a great way to avoid having to do anything about it.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Posted in: Trump says he'll push Japan for more 'reciprocal' trade, in a friendly way See in context

I love American meat when I’m in America but the meat that makes it over here is pure garbage. No wonder nobody wants to buy it. Why not export decent meat if they want people to buy it, instead of dumping the meat they can’t sell domestically in other countries?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Posted in: Doctor negligence suspected over death after delivery under anesthetic See in context

The problem is lack of experienced anesthesiologists to administer the epidural. In other countries there are staff with decades of experience administering them, so complications are very rare. Here the maternity clinics either hire a 9 to 5 anesthesiologist and induce labor to fit into the schedule, which adds a layer of danger, or obstetricians with insufficient anesthesia experience do it themselves.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Man arrested for causing death of two in Tomei Expressway crash following argument See in context

According to the local news, this guy had caused similar incidents in the past, possibly to collect the insurance money.

I’ve seen a few road rage incidents over the last few years. We got dash cams, and with the video from one I made a report of a road rage incident to the police. They didn’t care though, of course.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Trump hits back at late night shows critical of Republicans See in context

I can’t believe people are even entertaining the idea of a second Trump term. The guy is a shambling mess, complete basket case. I doubt he’ll be using the toilet by himself at the end of 4 years, much less running for re-election. It’s sad for him that the stress of being president appears to be accelerating the process of whatever dementia or age-related issue he has, but even just from January to now it’s pretty clear that he has gotten much worse.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Posted in: Gunman kills 59, injures 500, in Las Vegas concert attack; Trump calls it 'act of pure evil' See in context

There is a way to cut down on these kinds of incidents without taking guns from law abiding citizens, but it would involve investment in education and mental health care, particularly for children. So Republicans would just prefer to let people be gunned down.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Posted in: Gunman kills 59, injures 500, in Las Vegas concert attack; Trump calls it 'act of pure evil' See in context

Studies done of the people who do these things have shown a common link in childhood abuse/neglect, and with a bank robber father that is likely to apply here, too. Aggressive efforts in childhood education and health care, including mental health support for at-risk children and parents, would likely have an effect, but with Ms. Amway Devos defunding public education as fast as she can, it is unlikely this will ever happen. Add that to the ridiculous conflation of patriotism/freedom/masculinity with firearms that so many people have, and we can expect these incidents to continue, and keep getting worse.

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Posted in: San Francisco unveils memorial to WWII 'comfort women' See in context

I think the reason they keep building statues is adequately displayed in the comments on this thread.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Posted in: NBA, NFL and athletes hit back after Trump tirade See in context

People refused to listen to Black Lives Matter because they said they weren't respectful enough. So a man does a quiet, respectful protest, and they still don't want to listen. It's not the form of protest they are objecting to. By the way my grandfather was a proud WWII vet who also marched and protested for civil rights and believed deeply in equality, and I know he would support these players and be horrified that his memory is being used to continue the oppression of African Americans, something he was deeply against.

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Posted in: Japanese car rentals include stickers that read: 'A foreigner is driving' See in context

Posters worried about driving on the other side of the road must not have ever done it. It's very easy to switch, because most of driving is muscle memory. Your brain adapts automatically. The hardest thing to adjust to is the reversed position of the turn signal and windshield wipers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: New exhibition in Tokyo focuses on Japanese 'comfort women' See in context

These women were heavily stigmatized when they returned to Japan, because everyone knew who they were and where they had been. Would be nice to see some official acknowledgment of their suffering. Women who went to the front as nurses, cooks, etc. were also forced to sleep with a quota of soldiers daily. There has been much written about this by Japanese historians but it doesn't get much publicity.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Posted in: Japan's cutesy 'kei' cars hit rocky road See in context

They really aren't safe in a crash, as I have experienced personally. I like the economic value, but I could never put my kids in one.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Trump pardons ex-Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio See in context

Arpaio was by all accounts a failure of a sheriff. Far from fighting crime, 911 response times skyrocketed during his tenure because he had all his people working on illegal immigration and harassing his political opponents. It was basically a free for all for rape and other sex crimes, most of which weren't investigated at all. And yet he had no real effect on illegal immigration into the county anyway. He wasn't "just doing his job." He was doing a terrible job, besides being a racist nutbag, and the county was less safe with him in charge.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Posted in: Gov't studies safety of painless childbirth See in context

This has a lot to do with inexperience. Anesthesiologists at major hospitals who attend many C sections are experienced in giving epidurals, but these hospitals usually don't offer optional epidurals. The smaller private hospitals that do have a hard time finding anesthesiologists with enough relevant experience, creating a safety hazard. In countries where these practices are the norm, doctors get ample experience during residency. Another issue is they often insist on induction in order to suit the anesthesiologist's schedule, which adds a layer of complexity. I looked into this before having my own children and found there wasn't a hospital local to me that offered this in conditions I considered safe.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: 3-year-old boy left in car dies from heatstroke See in context

I don't let my inlaws drive my kids to nursery or watch them alone because of this kind of thing. They are far too inattentive and forgetful to be responsible for such young children. If they were 10 years younger it would be different, but the reality is that they can't do it anymore. There have been a few close calls because my spouse insists on giving them endless chances but at this point I have a good grasp of what they are and aren't capable of and I don't allow those lines to be crossed. When the kids are older and can look out for themselves better then they can stay at grandma's alone, but I can't bet their lives on grandma's ever encroaching senility.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Posted in: Court rules Korean school entitled to gov't tuition-free program See in context

It's not special privileges. The ruling is that they can't treat the schools differently than other private schools just because of the actions of the North Korean state. A fair ruling, since most of these schools have a long history in Japan that predates the North Korean state, and the private school subsidies can be used at other types of international schools.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Posted in: Boy dies from heatstroke after being left in car; 1-yr-old boy also dies in car while dad plays pachinko See in context

It's likely that he was doing something in the car, playing a game or reading or the like, and the mother told him to come along when he was ready, and he fell asleep or passed out when it got hot inside. I wouldn't expect a 9 year old to be a good judge of how long it would be safe to stay in the car. The mother letting him wait in the car by himself is perfectly safe in milder weather, but she should have checked up on him.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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