Alice comments

Posted in: 1st exam held in Japan for foreigners seeking new work visa See in context

It will be interesting to see how many will pass this year, I think. I also think that the Japanese approach here is prudent. It's common practice in several countries that foreign workers have to demonstrate adequate language proficiency and knowledge in order to obtain a work visa, especially when seeking employment where interaction with native-born people is required, for example in health care or education. Some countries may require foreigners to pass a test in social studies too. The same countries may however make exceptions for specialists when the work language is non-native, or when work tasks don't demand much interaction with the native population.

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Posted in: Retiring late: More Japanese opt to prolong employment See in context

@Disillusioned

@M3M3M3

Most countries require a certain number of years of work before you can claim a full state pension, usually 25-30 years. If you've worked in Japan and paid your pension contributions, this time can count towards the 25-30 years even in your home country (depending which country you're from).

@Disillusioned

Which countries are you referring to? Do you have any links to consolidate these claims? I know this is not the case where I come from.

Norway is one such country where you have to work for a minimum of 40 years in order to receive a full state pension. Many other European countries have similar schemes and criteria as the ones I describe here, especially the Scandinavian countries. The retirement age in Norway is 67 years, but it's possible to retire as early as 52 depending on occupation etc. It's also possible to continue working after the age of 67, but payouts from the pension scheme will be reduced or may stop entirely.

A person may gain accreditation for work done abroad if the person has been a volunteer member of the Norwegian pension scheme while working abroad, meaning that the person have to pay pension contributions to Norway during that time. A person may also receive a minimum state pension if lived in Norway for a minimum of 40 years after reaching the age of 20. If a person has less than 40 years in any of the categories, the pension will be reduced accordingly, but it's possible to claim combinations of eligibility as well.

Rules and criteria for foreigners and immigrants may vary significantly depending on national agreements and the recipient's citizenship at the time of the first payout. It's worth noting that all immigrants in Norway who enter the country as refugees, they're exempt from all criteria and will always receive the maximum state pension, no matter the time spent in Norway or contributions paid.

In terms of payouts from the pension scheme, these can be made to any country in the world. However, if the recipient was born in Norway but lives abroad, the recipient has to pay an additional 15.9% tax penalty in addition to Norwegian income tax.

My Norwegian skills aren't the best, but that's how everything was explained to me. And here are some links for those who would like to compare the rules with Japanese ones and other countries: 

https://www.nav.no/no/Person/Pensjon/Alderspensjon/Relatert+informasjon/garantipensjon--428407

https://www.nav.no/en/Home

https://www.skatteetaten.no/en/person/

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Posted in: 30% of young Japanese say Diet not helping people's lives See in context

@BigYen

Yeah, I'm fairly sure that a massive majority of 18-25 year olds in any country in the world would say their democratic assembly wasn't helping them either.

I agree with you. Also, I was surprised that only 30% of young Japanese said that the Diet isn't helping people's lives. This number is actually rather low, at least when compared to similar surveys made in western countries.

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Posted in: Record 2.73 mil foreign residents registered living in Japan in 2018 See in context

@zichi

Robots don't pay income taxes......

That's true, and I think that's one of the big challenges in regards to automation. Maybe more automation in the public sector as well will offset the potential reduction in income taxes. Levies on general production activities may also be a suitable remedy to any loss of taxes, as long as the overall cost of production when automated still remains lower than before.

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Posted in: Record 2.73 mil foreign residents registered living in Japan in 2018 See in context

@MiaTanaka

I agree with your post. By the way, I have a small correction. About 11% of the population in Norway were born in Africa or Asia, or have two parents born in those regions. About 18% of the total population were born outside of Norway or are children of two immigrant parents. In addition biracial people make up a large part of the younger generation.

While Norway is becoming a country that will be inherited by immigrants just like Sweden and most other western countries, Japan will never find itself in a similar situation, I think. Its culture is strong enough to withstand external social pressures. I also think that Japan won't need many immigrants in the future despite its somewhat low birth rate, mainly because investments in automation and other technologies will reduce its need for workers.

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Posted in: 49 killed, more than 20 wounded in 2 New Zealand mosque shootings; 4 suspects in custody See in context

@Silvafan

You are picking a choosing only certain parts of his manifesto. As someone pointed out above.

I'm not sure what you mean, but your comment is a very weak rebuttal if that's even what it's supposed to be. I'm pointing to the relevant parts of his past and in his manifesto in reference to how the person is being portrayed in media, hence my statement. The other parts of his personal history and his manifesto don't change the fact that he has more in common with left-wing radicalism than any other political leanings.

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Posted in: 49 killed, more than 20 wounded in 2 New Zealand mosque shootings; 4 suspects in custody See in context

Many things have already been said here, although I don't really understand why they call the shooter a 'far-right supporter'. He has long been an eco-terrorist very much opposed to corporatism and private ownership. And even in his so-called manifest, he strongly denounces conservatism and its reliance on western traditional values. So basically he seems far more like a left-wing radical to me. In any case, I think media play their part in exacerbating the political and social conflicts which will eventually tear down and destroy western societies.

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