Capt USA comments

Posted in: Disney's 'Peter Pan,' 'Aristocats,' 'Dumbo' get racism advisories See in context

@Reynard

Actually, that's exactly what I'm arguing.

Being acceptable at that time and place is the determiner of what is right in that time and place (that's not to say 'good', which is another concept entirely).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Disney's 'Peter Pan,' 'Aristocats,' 'Dumbo' get racism advisories See in context

I am usually put off by Disney's obsession with political correctness, but this approach is fairly sensible, I suppose.

Though I wonder about that phrase "it was wrong then and it's wrong now.". Was it wrong then? I don't think many people, if any (including the black actors who voiced the crows in 'Dumbo') would have thought that was wrong at the time. The people who made these movies were the Leftists and progressives of their day.

This is an important point, relevant to many controversies about how history should be remembered.

The Left reflexively believes that the moral values of 2020 contain some sort of absolute or intrinsic truth which could have been grasped by people 50 or 500 years ago, had they simply thought about it enough, perhaps.

This a grossly fallacious, and harmful idea to be propagating The Left thus far only applies it selectively to targets of choice, but taken to it's logical conclusions it would render ALL people of the past immoral.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Posted in: Japan, U.S. start talks on cost of hosting American troops See in context

@Otacon

If it really was such a bad deal for Japan, don't you think they might know that?

They are a sovereign nation, and can ask the US to leave at any time.

All of you claiming the security pact is bad for Japan are obviously a lot smarter than Japan's leaders. Maybe you should be in charge.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Posted in: Japan, U.S. start talks on cost of hosting American troops See in context

Today 09:27 am JST

From 6 to 9 minutes. That’s how long the first wave of missiles from China would take to hit Japan.

Maybe, but don't you think China knows what would happen to them 6 minutes after that? It's called a deterrent.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Posted in: Pompeo calls Suga 'force for good' during visit to boost solidarity against China See in context

-------Yes clearly it is so truly democratic here that posts on news websites with factual but 'inconvenient' information are deleted. How right your are.-----

So, Japan doesn't allow criticism of its government? Funny.... there seems to be an awful lot of that posted here. Maybe they haven't gotten to it yet?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Pompeo calls Suga 'force for good' during visit to boost solidarity against China See in context

-moonbloom

Yes, it was nefarious and not something either government is proud of. I always feel a bit sickened whenever I read about our giving the likes of Kishi and other war criminals the VIP treatment.

But should it not have been done? Sure, with hindsight one can posit that the Cold War might have been won without this or that CIA coup, but one must remember the geopolitical situation in the 50s.

The Soviet Union and its beneficiaries were not much less a threat to the world than Germany and Japan had been, and they certainly didn't play by the rules, so we could hardly afford to, either.

It's far more significant that America, by imposing democratic rule, gave the Japanese people sovereignty over their nation; something their own leaders never did. Not to mention freedom of speech, equality of women, etc.

And the LDP, for all its faults, did raise the standard of living of Japanese people to among the highest in the world, after all.

As for your assertion that Japan is 'antagonizing' its neighbors (i.e. NKorea and China), I confess i've never heard that one before. I'd love to hear more.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Posted in: Pompeo calls Suga 'force for good' during visit to boost solidarity against China See in context

Funny that you 'respect' countries where people cannot choose their leaders and have no rights, yet refer to people who in democratic societies as 'under dominion.'

13 ( +19 / -6 )

Posted in: 5 things to know about Japan's World War II surrender See in context

SOME of Japan's leaders were considering "negotiations" (call them 'peace talks' if it serves one's purpose) on terms they found favorable given their situation. Namely, they insisted on retention of the Japanese polity, meaning they keep their grip on power.

Of course the allies found this unacceptable. And not unreasonably so.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Posted in: 5 things to know about Japan's World War II surrender See in context

@Cristopher Glen and Vanessa Carlisle

I'm with y'all on that one.  The biggest problem with the argument that the atomic bombs ended the war is that this presumes the leaders of Japan were that concerned with the lives of their citizens. There's little evidence they were.

After all that Japan had lost in the war up to that point, the lives of 100,000 civilians would not have altered their resolve.  Invasion by the Soviets was a far graver threat, and this weighed much heavier in the minds of the Army command, who held the real power.  And once Hirohito heard that he would be spared, that was enough to satisfy him.

After years of studying this, I too came to the realization that the atomic bombings merely did something like give them a public excuse to surrender.   

Could the surrender have been brought without the atomic bombs?  Would the Soviet invasion, and American concession to keep Hirohito on the throne, been enough?   

Japanese leaders, in post-war interviews, gave varying and contradictory opinions on this question.  Some said it could have happened without the atomic bombs, but most said it couldn't have.   

That's about the closest thing to a final answer we're ever going to get, I'm afraid.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Posted in: 5 things to know about Japan's World War II surrender See in context

It's telling that revisionists will always quote such remorseful US officials when seeking to show the Japanese were 'about to surrender'.

They will never present any Japanese evidence of such an intention. That's because none exists. All the records of meetings and even private discussions among the war council and the emperor show the opposite was true.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Posted in: 5 things to know about Japan's World War II surrender See in context

(surprise), the Japanese leadership.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Posted in: 5 things to know about Japan's World War II surrender See in context

@Peter Neil

One can indeed find high-ranking US officials who offered opinions years after the war that Japan was ready to surrender, or had even offered to do so. Presenting such quotes is a common approach to portraying the atomic bombings as unjustified.

The problem is, even figures as authoritative as Leahy, King, and Nimitz can offer no evidence to support these opinions (not that they were pressed to by their interviewers). I don't know why they said these things. Perhaps they were, understandably, disturbed by the scenes of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

I think you'll agree that if one were trying to learn the intentions of the Japanese leadership regarding possible surrender, one should simply look to the the records and statements of (s

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Posted in: 5 things to know about Japan's World War II surrender See in context

@Peter Neil

The Japanese offered to surrender in April? That is complete nonsense.

I can only suppose you are referring to the abortive plan hatched by some members in the Japanese oligarchy to approach Stalin with the idea that he might facilitate "negotiations" (NOT surrender) with the US.

They envisioned something like "OK, we've won a few, you've won a few, let's wind this thing down. How bout this: you can have the Philippines and Indonesia back, but we keep Taiwan, Korea and Manchuria. And of course the Army and emperor retain total control here at home. That sounds fair, don't you think?"

To be clear; No One in the amorphous Japanese leadership even considered giving up all conquered territory, much less consenting to letting the US remove them from power, try them for war crimes, and turn Japan into a democracy. And please, don't take my word for it, they are all on record saying exactly this, time and time again throughout the final months of the war.

There never was a Japanese offer of surrender, nor anything even resembling one, prior to the atomic bombings and Soviet declaration of war, no matter how much some people with ulterior motives would like to imagine there was.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Posted in: Female-centric 'Star Wars' series in works: reports See in context

@Bugle Boy

I think you're right. They have used the reprehensible comments of a few cretins online to scapegoat racism/misogyny for the failure of the new trilogy, when in truth they were just flat, forgettable movies.

(OK, relative failure; I know they made billions, but does anyone really care about these movies? Do people wear Rise of Skywalker T-shirts? Like Avatar, everyone saw it but nobody remembers it. They aren't building on the legacy, they're just selling it out, and the Disney execs know they can't do that for long.)

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Posted in: 25th anniversary of Great Hanshin Earthquake observed See in context

I think I remember reading that something like 80 or 90 percent of the houses that collapsed were built before 1971, when construction codes were introduced. At least that's encouraging for anyone living in a building less than 50 years old.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Leia has key role as 'Star Wars' wraps Skywalker saga See in context

Not going to see this. And I saw the original 9 times in the theater in '77 when I was a 4th grader.

I know some people think the new ones are great because of their post-modern angst and irony, but I couldn't bring myself to care about very much of it. It looks like Star Wars, but doesn't feel like it. I think I have never enjoyed a movie less than I did The Last Jedi. I just kept thinking "make it stop, please.". And I never thought that watching the prequels, flawed as they were.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Posted in: Researchers find second Japanese warship sunk in Battle of Midway See in context

because they had deliberately enticed the attack, and wanted a heavy loss of life in order to change US public's attitude into joining in WWII. They had been setting increasingly powerful sanctions against Japan for a year, before Japan bit the bait. Read 'Day of Deceit' by Robert B. Stinnett.

Sorry? How exactly did the US "entice" the attack?

You're suggesting America should have continued selling oil to a hostile nation?

And Stinnett's book has been widely dismissed as nonsense by historians.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Japan to dispatch SDF to Strait of Hormuz instead of joining U.S.-led coalition See in context

Nice picture of the Kaga here. Named after the great old WWII carrier.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Posted in: U.S. beats Netherlands 2-0 to win 4th Women's World Cup title See in context

Athletes' salaries depend on the revenue they generate, not on their success within that sport.

Womens' soccer does not generate a fraction of what mens' soccer does. This is a reflection of a lack of public interest on the part of both women and men, not discrimination.

Male athletes are paid more because people are willing to pay ridiculous (stupid, even) amounts of money for tickets and merchandise.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Posted in: Russell says Abrams' new 'Star Wars' script made her cry See in context

The Force Awakens was neither good nor bad, seemingly by design. They made something totally risk-averse to avoid the kind of scorn levelled at the prequels.

The Last Jedi was possibly the worst movie I have ever seen.

I'm not planning to see this new one. Star Wars is dead to me now.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Posted in: Canadian English teacher filmed hitting 2-year-old child at daycare facility See in context

To the posters here defending this teacher's actions; you seem unaware of what children are capable of at a given age.

This child is TWO YEARS OLD. He was completely unaware a 'lesson' was even taking place, much less that he was expected to behave properly. And, no, he did not 'learn' anything from this spasm of violence.

The phrase 'unlicensed daycare' pretty much tells you all you need to know about this situation.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Posted in: Scientists set to unveil first picture of a black hole See in context

Yeah.

If you know anything about black holes, you know not to expect very much from this soon to be released picture.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Posted in: 'Star Wars' producer Kennedy wants new movie voices 'to bring world to its senses' See in context

Star Wars was supposed to be about ancient mythical and legendary themes. That's what made it unique.

Kennedy has made it all about post-modern angst and irony, the antithesis of what it was.

They cashed in on the name for a few movies, but good will is rapidly fading now. She's literally killing the franchise, and I hope that's what she'll be remembered for.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Posted in: Nippon Steel rebuffs S Korean lawyers in forced labor row See in context

That is a completely ridiculous statement.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Posted in: Nippon Steel rebuffs S Korean lawyers in forced labor row See in context

@Takeshi Hasegawa

There is a huge cultural difference in how Western countries believe past wrongs should be addressed. 

Japan issues an apology, pays some money, then tries as hard as possible to forget the whole thing. Far from "epoch-making," to Western countries this seems to be severly inadequate.  

Western countries generally believe it is more important to remember past wrongs, understand why they happened, and teach their children the horrible truth to instill a sense of remorse and humility.

In short, Westerners believe it's better to actually BE sorry than to just SAY sorry. 

This probably sounds empty to you, but consider that Western countries all have good relations with former colonies, whereas Japan can't get along with it's neighbors. (I'm not saying it's all Japan's fault; Korea and China teach their children to hate Japan, which is outrageous).

My only point is that your assertion, that Japan has done more than Western countries to atone for the past, is far shakier than you seem to realize.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Posted in: South Korea pushes back at Japan in forced World War II labor row See in context

Technically speaking, Japan is right that the issue was resolved by the 1965 treaty.

But, the Korean government that signed that treaty was just a military dictatorship that was looking only at the short term gains of signing (namely, a ton of money).

That Korean government was not a democracy, and so Koreans today can say that government didn't speak for them.

Now, about that Comfort Women agreement signed a few years ago.... this would seem to point to competency issues in the Korean govt.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

Posted in: Chinese 'gait recognition' tech IDs people by how they walk See in context

Pretty chilling to hear them all speak with such enthusiasm for surveillance.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Posted in: British woman sues Japanese university over power harassment See in context

Though I agree with Maria that the thing about saying her doctorate was forged sounds bizzare, and possibly indicative of some kind of bullying if they had no concrete reason for saying it.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Posted in: British woman sues Japanese university over power harassment See in context

MikeH -

How on Earth do you know the criticism was baseless?

I've lived in Japan a long time, and have witnessed countless times Western people (men and women alike) behaving in ways that, though normal in our own culture, are not considered appropriate in Japan.

Acting high-handed and forcing one's options on others would be classic examples of this. Doing this shows either an inability or unwillingness to understand Japanese culture.

Such a person, man or woman, is obviously not likely to be favored for promotion.

Of course, knowing Japan, she may very well have been treated unreasonably. You just can't tell from the article.

2 ( +12 / -10 )

Posted in: British woman sues Japanese university over power harassment See in context

Though I admit you can't get any sense of the situation from the article, these remarks hardly strike me as an egregious violation of one's rights.

A: "You're too high-handed sometimes."

B: "Did you really just say that? I want $700,000."

Sounds ridiculous. Though I say again, we don't really know what all went on here.

-7 ( +14 / -21 )

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