daito_hak comments

Posted in: New Omicron variant stokes world fears; triggers travel bans See in context

Omicron. What a ridiculous naming, this is pathetically silly and tells a lot about our period of mediocrity.

And what a hysteria. What a hysteria. The world has really come to a sad state where fear rules more than anything else.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

Posted in: Tokyo ranked 3rd most attractive city in Global Power Index See in context

All these cities are insanely expensive to rent a place to live that would barely qualify as living in dignity and are overpopulated. But somehow they are deemed "attractive".

14 ( +19 / -5 )

Posted in: Tokyo Tower lights up in celebration of Ohtani MVP award See in context

Ridiculous waste of energy and money. For some silly patriotism.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Posted in: Japan to administer COVID-19 booster shots from Dec 1 See in context

Completely false, one because natural infection comes with all the risks you avoid with vaccination, which by definition would make it worse, and because it can be less effective and last for shorter time, which would make reinfections a greater risk than infections after vaccination. Just expressing irrational wishes as if they were facts do not make them so.

Makes no sense and it is factually not true. You are again just persuaded on what you are saying without the beginning of a scientific based argumentation with real data. There isn't a consensus on what is better in term of protection. Infection-induced immunity or vaccine-induced immunity. A recent report from CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/science-briefs/vaccine-induced-immunity.html#anchor_1635539757101

concluded that both infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity are durable for at least six months — but that vaccines are more consistent in their protection and offer a boost in antibodies for people previously infected. However the pool of data was small. An analysis of the data showed that 7,348 people, or a little over 3 percent of the participants, met the study criteria. Among the 6,328 people who were fully vaccinated, 324 (or 5.1 percent) had a positive COVID-19 PCR test. Among the 1,020 who were unvaccinated and who had previously had the infection, 89 (or 8.7 percent) had a positive COVID-19 PCR test.

However a recent study from a team in Israel has published a study (pending peer-reviewing) which completely contradicts the CDC results.

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.08.24.21262415v1

What makes this study important is that it comes not only from a country that has been upfront in publishing a lot of data in this topic but it is also one of the most vaccinated country in the world. As a result, their study is based on a way bigger data set. The study used 10 times more people than the CDC one, they primarily used the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. In the U.S., three are approved, including the Pfizer, the Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines. The Israeli study period was March 1, 2020 to August 14, 2021. They used a database of Maccabi Healthcare Services (MHS), Israel’s second largest Health Maintenance Organization. Overall, 673,676 MHS members 16 years and older were eligible for the study group of fully vaccinated SARS-CoV-2-naïve individuals; 62,883 were eligible for the study group of unvaccinated previously infected individuals and 42,099 individuals were eligible for the study group of previously infected and single-dose vaccines.

The study concluded that natural immunity is 13 times more effective than vaccines in protecting individuals, in other words, SARS-CoV-2-naïve vaccines had a 13-fold increased risk for breakthrough infection with the Indian variant compared to those previously infected. Although there was waning natural immunity identified as well, vaccinated individuals had a 5.96-fold increased risk for breakthrough infection and a 7.13-fold increased risk for symptomatic disease. This study demonstrated that natural immunity confers longer lasting and stronger protection against infection, symptomatic disease and hospitalization caused by the Indian variant of SARS-CoV-2, compared to the BNT162b2 two-dose vaccine-induced immunity. Individuals who were both previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 and given a single dose of the vaccine gained additional protection against the Indian variant.

In fact 15 studies have showed the effectiveness of infection-induced immunity.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2021/09/15/natural-immunity-vaccine-mandate/

Here are some of them

https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abh1766

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-22034-1

https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/224/1/31/6179975

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03647-4

You may not like it being locked up in your distorted reality, but that's the way it is. Just stop your vaccine extremism and start to look at the data the way they should be looked at. In a rational and scientific perpective instead of a partisan and ideologic way. That does not mean that vaccine are not an important tool. They absolutely are. They are what they are essentially designed for. They help to prevent the population and more precisely the most vulnerable ones to develop severe forms of the infection. They are not magical tools. In fact we know now (which I told you many months ago and I was right) that they are not very good at preventing infection and the spread of the virus in the long term. But this is ok, the virus is basically now endemic (as I also told you it would become which you wrongly refuted) so I do no think that we need to worry about that. That's fine, we still don't to need to run after useless booster shots for the whole population. This is ridiculous.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

Posted in: Singapore to stop paying medical bills for those who choose to be unvaccinated See in context

Why people can't have a rational argument instead of just being hysterics and extremists? Saying oh yeah it's the way to go and calling it the day is not sufficient and just shows a lack of judgement if not basic intelligence. I call this decision tyrannic, hugely disproportional and profoundly unfair. That's not surprising coming from a state known to be authoritative, but this is going too far given the implications.

Those people did not have the right for health insurance benefits out of thin air. Singapore’s public healthcare is funded by taxes, which cover about one-fourth of Singapore’s total health costs. Individuals and their employers pay for the rest in the form of mandatory life insurance schemes and deductions from the compulsory savings plan, or the Central Provident Fund (CPF). Medishield and Medisave are the core of Singapore’s health insurance system. Medishield: For big expenses, Singaporeans can access their Medishield Life, a basic health insurance scheme that all permanent residents and citizens can use to pay for large bills, as well as costly outpatient treatments like kidney dialysis. Those seeking to top up their Medishield Life plans can purchase Private Integrated Shield Plans, which are designed and managed by private health insurance companies. Medisave: This is a mandatory savings plan that consumes between 7 and 9.5 percent of a worker’s wages. Singaporeans can use their Medisave accounts to pay for some types of routine care.

So citizens and permanent residents pay routine expenses out of their Medisave account, and if things get bad enough that they hit their deductible, they begin using the Medishield account.

In any case, people work, paid and are paying for having those benefits (in addition to their private plans). The government can't just decide to refuse health care for ANY reason to people who have paid for it. This is not ethical. A virus doesn't justify that, people refusing to get vaccinated does not justify that. The access to their health care to which they are paying has never been defined to be conditioned on anything. They contribute to it, they have the right for it. Changing so suddenly and without any real justification besides irrational fear the way the health system is fundamentally defined just shows how crazy so many countries have become in just two years. But if the Singapore government insists on that, then they should refund people for the cost of their health insurance.

1 ( +9 / -8 )

Posted in: 'Stock up', China says, amid new COVID outbreak See in context

More brutality in a ugly dictatorship regime that has found the perfect excuse with a virus for more brutality and oppression against the population.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

Posted in: Man in Joker costume with knife injures 17 people on Tokyo train; starts fire See in context

But are you making a blanket statement that a skilled martial artist

Again martial artist means really nothing. It’s a blank term that has no proper connection to reality. You find a lot of people calling themselves skilled martial artist and being total joke. Defending against a knife attack imply a robust conditioning with real knifes implemented in serious trainings. Only a bunch of people train really like that and are usually in special forces.

Yeah sure. One can take his chance and try something. For example taking the attacker by surprise. But even that, you would need enough skills to put him down and safely disarm him. But the risk of being seriously injured is very high if you don’t know what you are doing. Being brave isn’t enough. And when it come to strong guy, well you are in Japan, just look around you how many there are.

Not really, especially in such a case, when the knife-wielding guy is highly probably an amateur too and not a survival training pro or militarily skilled special team member or so.

Sorry but this is a very weak argument coming from someone who presumably have little experience in this. Knife attacks are dangerous because they are chaotic. You don’t need to be a military to be very dangerous with a knife. Anybody can throw stabs in all directions randomly at very high speed. It’s basically driven by instinct and anybody can do it very effectively.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Posted in: Man in Joker costume with knife injures 17 people on Tokyo train; starts fire See in context

You'd think that in a country where so many people learn martial arts

This is frankly totally wrong. This is just a old stereotype. Not that many people know how to fight here, even if some would happen to do a martial art, that would be one of the totally usuels ones.

someone with a reasonable grounding in aikido, judo or karate

No way, just no way. None of those teach people how to fight with someone armed with a knife in any realistic way whatsoever. Aikido is total fake, just focusing on magic and weird philosophy. Judo and karate focus on competition and are basically mostly useless in real fights, let alone against a knife.

Going after someone with a knife requires a lot of skills. A lot. Otherwise it’s death awaiting. Being myself a very long time practitioner of styles useable in real fights, I wouldn’t go against someone with a knife unless I can’t back up and go to a safe spot. Knife attacks are no jokes, and none of those traditional Japanese martial arts practitioners can deal with them without being killed.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Posted in: Over 70% fully vaccinated in Japan; among top 3 in G7 See in context

Over 70% fully vaccinated in Japan; among top 3 in G7

I don’t really see what giving wrong informations really helps for besides silly propaganda and nationalism. it’s certainly not among top 3 in G7.

France had vaccinated 74.4% of its population and 86.5% of the population aged more than 12 years old. UK has fully vaccinated 79.9% of its population.

https://covidtracker.fr/vaccintracker/

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/

5 ( +19 / -14 )

Posted in: Plastic additives found in 52% of seabirds around the globe: study See in context

Plastic additives found in 52% of seabirds around the globe: study

Oh yeah is that a surprise?

Humanity should make a choice at some point and stop to be hypocritical. Meaning the situation has been made worse with the generalization of the use of disposable face masks without any policy whatsoever to handle the generated waste. As of 2020 alone, it is estimated that billions of used masks have found their way into the ocean.

Disposable face masks (single use face masks) are produced from polymers such as polypropylene, polyurethane, polyacrylonitrile, polystyrene, polycarbonate, polyethylene, or polyester and therefore dramatically adding to the vast plastic and plastic particle waste in the environment.

Make a choice and stop to be all hypocrites including the so-called environment protection advocates that have totally disappeared on that subject because of the fear of publicly putting into question the mask.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Posted in: Tokyo reports 143 coronavirus cases See in context

Ever since the numbers have been coming down significantly, JT has not reported on the NUMBER OF TESTS performed like they used to before...

BS! This has been the case for a while now. For example here when the number of positive cases surpassed 5000.

https://japantoday.com/category/national/Tokyo-reports-record-high-5-042-coronavirus-cases-nationwide-tally-15-263

Just stop with the silly conspiracy theories.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Posted in: Gov't to shorten quarantine period for vaccinated travelers See in context

This is what happens when hysteria rules rather than rationality and science. We end up in grotesque situations or worse in hygienist tyrannies like China, Australia or New Zealand.

The change from 14 days to 10 days is peanuts, this is pathetic. It's insane that vaccinated people must be isolated for so long with severe penalties against foreigners if they don't. What the f.. point to be vaccinated if at least it does not help to not to have to go through that silly mess. In fact vaccinated people should not be imposed any restrictions any more. From being quarantined to wearing a mask. That's enough now with this ridiculous sh.. show, it has to stop.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Posted in: COVID-19 deaths of people aged under 60 soar in Japan due to Delta variant See in context

Silly fear mongering as usual in again a poorly and confusing article.

A total of 29 people aged 39 or younger died due to COVID-19 in the fifth wave, accounting for nearly half of the cumulative total fatalities of 63 in the same age group since the start of the pandemic, the ministry said.

So what? It absolutely not surprising. The Indian variant is more contiguous, this is not surprising that it can reach a larger population including more vulnerable people since most of them had health conditions or comorbidities. Death is unavoidable even in young population groups for any decease. What matters is whether there is an excess mortality. The data shows it isn't the case whatsoever.

20.6 percent of the total COVID-19 deaths of 860, with the rate jumping more than fivefold from 3.8 percent of the death toll reported before early February, according to the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry.

3.8% of how many? Makes not sense to compare like that and make it dramatic by saying a fivefold jump.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Posted in: Virus lockdown extended for Australia's capital by 4 weeks See in context

This is the safest path forward and it will lead to a safer Christmas, a safer summer holiday period and a safer 2022," he told reporters.

Yeah you said exactly the same thing a year ago when you should have planned for a campaign of vaccination instead of following a non-scientific BS based zero-COVID strategy.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Posted in: China races to squash new COVID-19 cluster among schoolchildren See in context

Yeah so we have hygienism and hysteria combined with China authoritarianism and dictatorship, what can go possibly wrong? Well a brutal and criminal regime given even more power for the sake of the called "zero-COVID".

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Posted in: Tokyo reports 1,675 coronavirus cases; nationwide tally 10,400 See in context

Just yesterday a boy died in Osaka due to Covid-19. Fatalities may be low in kids, but it’s not a given they will just recover.

This is fallacious thinking and so typical of the hysteria around COVID. A single case does not make a general rule as the data suggests that the mortality in Japan is low even until 50 years old.

http://www.ipss.go.jp/projects/j/choju/covid19/index-en.asp

And death among children from a particular decease is not new with COVID. It's relatively rare but it does exist for many other deceases like flu, common cold coronavirus infections, bacterial infections, cancer, cardio-vascular failures, genetic decease, etc. That's the universe where we live, it's like this. It's not the norm but it does exist.

0 ( +15 / -15 )

Posted in: Tokyo reports 1,675 coronavirus cases; nationwide tally 10,400 See in context

The hospitalization of children is growing around the world.

Present data show that although hospitalizations has increased in some countries (eg. USA) and not "around the world" as you said without any data to back that up, there is no significant increase of the number of children aged 0-17 with severe complications that require care at ICUs. A recent study from the CDC in US done between March 1 last year and Aug. 14 this year showed that weekly hospitalizations of children aged 0-17 were at their lowest between June 12 and July 3, at 0.3 per 100,000, before rising to 1.4 per 100,000 in the week ending Aug. 14 — a 4.7-fold increase but still very low. However the percentage of children with severe indicators and admitted to intensive care was 26.5% pre-delta and 23.2% post; the percent placed on ventilators was 6.1% pre-delta and 9.8% post; and the percent who died was 0.7% pre-delta and 1.8% post. These differences did not rise to the level of statistical significance.

-2 ( +12 / -14 )

Posted in: Sydney floats pub promise to boost double-dose vaccination rate See in context

If the target is reached in October, Sydney residents would have spent up to four months under stay-at-home orders.

Stupid country. They were wrong, flat wrong to think that they could have zero-covid in the long run. How could this be even possible in an open world where the virus has become endemic? Only stupid people could believe that (and apparently there are still a lot them in some states there). The only rational solution was the vaccination with priority given first to the vulnerable population. Thinking that somehow a virus can't circulate is not science, that's fanaticism. But no, the stupids did not listen, they were locked in their dogmatism and hygienism.

One would think that their blatant mistakes would make them more humble and reconsider their hysteric and tyrannic way of doing things. But no, four months under say-at-home orders. The leaders in Australia are fanatics, nobody with a minimum of rationality can defend that this is right.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Posted in: Takaichi joins race to be next PM; outlines 'Sanaenomics' policy See in context

She has my vote!

You missed again your chance to not write a totally silly post. Congratulations.

For a change, why not elect a woman to be Japan's new premier?

The fact she is a woman does not matter. She is literally insane and hence have no business to lead this country. I don’t care she is a woman.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Posted in: New Zealand police kill man after he stabs 6 people at supermarket See in context

The same people bitching about this guy not being jailed for his thoughts are the same people who moan how NZ is a police state because of its COVID restrictions.

Consistent in their hypocrisy.

It’s the total opposite, how could you write such a stupid post, it’s alarmist hilarious. The point is that NZ is being easily authoritarian to lock people down for a virus but can’t be enough tough to keep a dangerous person in prison. NZ was tough enough to close its borders for the virus but can’t close them to dangerous terrorists. Instead of that, witch Ardern was more than open to welcome everyone with her stupid progressive dogma.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Posted in: Nagoya mayor who bit Olympian's gold medal tests positive for COVID See in context

has not developed any symptoms and is resting at home

If he has no symptoms (he is also probably vaccinated I presume) then there is no point to say he is resting at home. He is resting from what? Just stop to always dramatize things when they don't need to be. He is at home because he is forced to stay there for isolation, not because for the sake of just resting.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Posted in: Record 98 pregnant women in Tokyo had COVID-19 in July: study See in context

The incident has underscored the strain on hospitals due to the explosive spread of COVID-19.

This basically means nothing and it’s almost misinformation. She was rejected because the hospitals who refused her claimed that they would not be able to protect against an infection spread in their establishment since she was positive. They did not refuse her because they could not provide care from being overwhelmed from the COVID. It’s was purely from fear than any other rational reason.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

Posted in: Japan's governors call for COVID lockdown See in context

It’s been wildly successful in Australia and NZ.

That’s even quit debatable. Australia used strict lockdowns last winter. If lockdowns work, why are they again in lockdown for basically all the winter this year too? And that’s even not mentioning the catastrophic social and economical consequences of lockdowns which are now well documented.

But besides the point whether lockdowns work or not, the question is more profound than that. It’s philosophical and morality. How far a state can go in brutality and authoritarianism for the name of health? Australia’s government is basically saying to its population that it knows what’s good for them and people are going to listen whether they like it or not.

It really doesn’t require a lot of intelligence, moral and humanity to understand that Australia and New Zealand are not doing the right thing. They are wrong, they are disgraceful.

This article describes it well. Please read it and please just take the time to think at least five minutes about it.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion/2021/08/19/commentary/world-commentary/australia-authoritarian-covid-19-response/

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Posted in: Sydney extends lockdown for another month; imposes partial curfew See in context

Stay-at-home orders will now remain in place across the city until the end of September and residents in virus hotspots will also be subject to a nighttime curfew and limited to one hour of outdoor exercise a day.

Better to call this country China, not Australia anymore. What a disgrace, what a disgrace for Australia (and New Zealand too). What a government of fanatics and primitive idiots. And the majority of the population is just accepting this situation without resistance despite the fact that this shameful and disgusting lockdown imposed on them without any democratic consultation is the result of the complete and utter incompetence of the government which failed to vaccinate the population. They failed, failed miserably and now have the nerds to come up with disgusting authoritarian measures for the name of what? A few hundred positive cases and hygienism? If they are so fearful towards the virus, they should have vaccinated the population, not believing in the utopia of zero COVID. Idiots!

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Posted in: Woman with COVID-19 loses baby after being forced to give birth prematurely at home See in context

Medical institutions that can take on a pregnant woman with COVID-19 are limited due to more complications related to preventing the virus from spreading within the hospital.

It's just the COVID hysteria all over again that cost the life of a baby. She does not have the plague for the sake of rationality. Of course it was safe to bring her to any general hospital or maternity hospital with a the adequate protective measures which really are not rocket science difficult. Tired to hear in these countries, Japan and others, people hiding behind the COVID to justify systemic failures of their health system.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Posted in: New Zealand says it has solved COVID outbreak puzzle See in context

Ardern ordered a three-day national lockdown

What an hysteric woman. She is crazy.

-18 ( +15 / -33 )

Posted in: China rejects need for further WHO coronavirus origins probe See in context

Meanwhile, Danish scientist Peter Ben Embarek, who led the international mission to Wuhan, said a lab employee infected while taking samples in the field falls under one of the likely hypotheses as to how the virus passed from bats to humans.

Keeping it to the science, looking scientifically at it could only lead to this hypothesis as being one of the most realistic or at least worth to consider and investigate seriously. But then the political ones, the ones who have no background in science (one of them often in this site forum will recognize himself) came to the discussion with again no scientific thinking and motivated purely by politics to call the people who have a scientific background conspiracy theorists.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Posted in: Australia's capital Canberra enters 7-day lockdown See in context

What an awful country to live in.

-7 ( +12 / -19 )

Posted in: 84 COVID-19 patients died at home in Japan over 6 months: gov't See in context

Completely the opposite, variants have appeared in the middle of huge peak of cases that could have been prevented by vaccination, immunity (even imperfect) inhibits the virus to keep replication for a long time (something that lets the virus mutate continuously until a variant that can escape better the immunity is selected) it also makes it more difficult for any variant to be transmitted to other people.

Again please stop to try to comment about something you don’t understand and provide instead links to publications that would be infinitely more convincing than this pile of words you put together randomly. Your embarrassing lack of science vocabulary and phrasing skills makes your post not much worthier than an opinion formulated by a elementary school student.

This also applies to all your other poorly written and often totally wrong posts on this page.

-10 ( +5 / -15 )

Posted in: Gov't policy to only hospitalize critical COVID patients draws flak See in context

but not hospitalizing patients that have respiratory distress is even worse

Do you even understand the words you use? Distress means that patients would be in serious danger and in peril. I don’t think that the government is saying that such patients should not be hospitalized. The issue is about moderate patients. For mild patients, this is clear, they shouldn’t be hospitalized.

Moderate patients are classified into two groups. Moderate I - who have difficulty breathing and have signs of pneumonia; and moderate II - who can’t breathe sufficiently on their own. Moderate II patients will presumably continue to be hospitalized. Moderate I patients will be hospitalized depending on whether they are at risk for further complications.

You can then argue whether this is an adequate decision. But stop throwing words randomly without fully understanding the issue.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

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