flacteMnaD comments

Posted in: Record 832 foreigners in Japan lose residency status in 2018 See in context

"Child of a Japanese National" means exactly that... Someone who is born to a Japanese National, but also no longer has Japanese citizenship. My wife, after living in the US for 25 years became a US citizen. When returning to Japan to help her aging parents the consulate performed rigorous checks and declared she was no longer a Japanese citizen. (A sad day, but that's the Japanese law as it stands now. If we could get that dual citizenship fixed in Japan it would be terrific, but that's another article.)

Anyway, she obtained a visa: "Child of a Japanese National". As her spouse I obtained a visa: "Long Term Resident"

If our marriage was a fraud the government would void both visas and send us packing. (30 years of marriage is anything but a fraud though, so I think we're okay! We both have permanent residence now.)

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Posted in: Craft sake takes experimental turn in U.S. as popularity grows See in context

"What is the difference between craft sake and jizake?"

Japanese Sake or Seishu is defined as having the following ingredients: rice, rice-koji, water, sometimes brewers alcohol. Only "regular sake" is allowed additional flavoring agents of sweetener, acids and amino acids.

Jizake merely means locally produced sake. Often the term is used in reference to smaller brewers.

Craft Sake, per the current USA use of the term sometimes adds things like hops, fruit, and other non-traditional ingredients. With the addition of those ingredients it ceases to be called Nihon-shu or Seishu in Japan and becomes an "other alcohol" category drink. Not really the same class of drink at that point. I think craft brewers are frequently making both standard definition Sake and flavored Sake. Still, a wonderful product, and sure to bring out some interesting ideas with their background in craft brewed beers.

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Posted in: Craft sake takes experimental turn in U.S. as popularity grows See in context

Insane Wayne - "Competition will make foreign made sake better than Japanese sake."

I think you are forgetting the heavy rivalry amongst the 1200+ breweries in Japan right now. Competition doesn't get much tighter than that! Techniques and lessons learned over the past 1300 years today produce an amazing array of flavors, textures and products. It's doubtful that foreign breweries will easily rise to this level of competition.

Much like craft beer changed the image of beer in America, craft sake will lead to new sensations and methods. Foreign breweries are sure to forge ahead on their own paths, making new and interesting sake. It's an exciting time to see new innovation in the field, and I look forward to the opportunity to taste some of these new products. Interesting times ahead.

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