Gooch comments

Posted in: We are seeing more cases of late-stage cancers than usual, possibly due to a decline in screenings. People should go to the hospital without hesitation if they have any symptoms, and also undergo regular examinations. See in context

No, that is what happens when science deniers and people that promote the idea that "if you are healthy you should continue living normally" cause with widespread infection in the general population. The scientific consensus is that the pandemic is real, is dangerous and strong measures have to be taken to prevent infection that escalate in the same proportion as the infection becomes common in the population.

Er, no. It's as Wobot said: people have had the bejeezus scared out of them through the fear campaign, and hospitals were discouraging people from coming in for checkups and screenings owing to COVID fears and keeping beds available for COVID patients at the expense of just about everything else.

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Posted in: Tokyo Gas to install 19 offshore wind turbines in carbon-free push See in context

Ooooh, a new subsidy farm! So, can the Tokyo Gas state whether renewable energy will be used to construct and decommission these turbines, and whether the magnets contained in them will use rare earths sourced from China?

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Posted in: Would you support a boycott of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics? See in context

Yup. China as a whole should be boycotted until the CCP is dead and buried.

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Posted in: Hyogo Prefecture to give 320,000 fans to restaurants for customers to cover mouths, dine 'safely' See in context

Peak stupid continues to out-peak itself.

Does someone at the Hyogo prefectural assembly have a relative with a fan-making business?

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Posted in: What’s it like to shop at FamilyMart’s first 'unmanned' convenience store in Japan? See in context

Laguna Today  12:20 pm JST

Woulda been nice if the article informed how the register knew the quantities and identities of the purchase.

All products would have an RFID tag that scanners detect so the company can track inventory.

Not my cup of tea. Prefer to deal with people when I go shopping.

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Posted in: Suga to designate Tokyo for stronger anti-virus steps as infections spike See in context

LagunaToday  04:16 pm JST

Love the jackets. You could probably buy one at Daiso, but I'm guessing they spent several tens of thousand yen apiece.

If Japan loves anything, it's a uniform. High cost, and probably sourced from a company owned by a relative of a city councillor.

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Posted in: Australia says politicians no longer exempt from sexual harassment rules See in context

These are the same people supposedly protecting the country from a virus. This will end well.

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Posted in: Red alert See in context

Embarrassed, the Tower of the Sun throws its arms up in exasperation.

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Posted in: United Airlines prepares to shake up white, male-dominated pilot population See in context

Welcome aboard, passengers. The captain for your flight today is a visually challenged, vertically disadvantaged intersex person of color who has just passed their flight exams thanks to the joys of standardization. And you'll be pleased to know that all diversity boxes have been ticked.

Sit down, buckle up and hang on!

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Posted in: China warns Washington not to boycott Winter Olympics See in context

Looks like China has thrown IP law to the wind with those uniforms. Santa may sue.

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Posted in: Osaka declares COVID medical emergency with 878 new cases See in context

Dietary deficiencies have been know from the beginning as part of the preexisting conditions that influence the appearance of complications, vitamin D is no different from other nutrients, if you don't have enough your immune system is not at 100%. What has no evidence behind is supplementing vitamin D once you have normal levels.

What makes you an expert?

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Posted in: Osaka declares COVID medical emergency with 878 new cases See in context

Richard GallagherApr. 7  10:28 pm JST

As for the individual trumpeting HCQ, which has been proven numerous times to not be effective and the absurd notion of Vitamin D & Zinc, which has also proven NOT to have any effect in preventing the spread of the virus - such is the half-baked, nonsense that contributes to the increase in cases. Scientific researc, peer-reviewed, indicated none of those measures are effective, at all.

In this carefully worded report, some experts would dare to differ.

https://www.rte.ie/documents/news/2021/04/2021-04-07-report-on-addressing-vitamin-d-deficiency-as-a-public-health-measure-in-ireland-en.pdf

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Posted in: Osaka declares COVID medical emergency with 878 new cases See in context

WobotToday  08:43 am JST

How many of you actually live in Osaka or even know any people here? I do and everyone I know thinks it's it's overblown. They can see barely anybody is dying from it so none of the universities or schools are going to close.

Stop panicking, most people are testing positive with the snuffles. You don't have to go out if you don't want to

I do as well. Never met anyone who has had it. Know a few who are nervous about it, but they're generally nervous people anyway, but most are tired of the fear campaign.

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Posted in: Australia blames EU supply issues for slow vaccine rollout See in context

AntiquesavingToday  06:52 pm JST

But this wasn't supposed to be about the money, right? It's all about "humanitarianism."

Did I mention there's a bridge for sale across Sydney Harbor? PM me if you're interested

Then the right jump up and down get their knickers in a twist when governments intervene, goes about mandating local production, imposing price controls and nationalisese certain essential industries.

Just to be clear, I was basically agreeing with you.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

VR, if you're going to draw an analogy, with emphasis on the first two syllables, do try and make it coherent. Claiming I can't understand your analogy because it's nonsense isn't a reflection on me. The rest of your post sounds like an angry schoolteacher who's been humiliated by a pupil when trying to justify tyranny because we know what's best for you. End of story.

Governments consist of people, and people are fallible. They get things right some of the time and wrong some of the time, and aren't immune to making decisions that benefit themselves and their friends ahead of the general population. Happens all the time in every country. Same with some scientists who manipulate data to get grants and publicity, helped along by rubber-stamping peer reviewers. Perhaps if governments, the media, corporations and senior bureaucrats didn't blatantly lie so often when it wasn't necessary, more people would believe them when it was. They, and you, only have themselves to blame for the skepticism around this whole affair.

That's why some nations were established with constitutional limits on government power, to ensure the balance of power doesn't swing too far in one direction. Many governments are trying really hard right now to circumvent those, cherry-picking science to support their efforts while ignoring objective science that contravenes their message. You're clearly of the technocratic mindset, believing you have the answers and the general public can't be trusted to make their own decisions. Otherwise you wouldn't get so upset when other people challenge you.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

Oh dear. If you really want to live by your socialist principles, give up everything you have that has been produced in a market economy, including covid vaccines except for the Chinese one. That would be taking responsibility for what you believe in. But I doubt you'd like the consequences.

For better or worse, market economies have brough millions out from the depths of poverty, and of course they're not perfect. There's no such thing as a perfect system. For the record, I condemn the banker bailouts from the GFC. It was Western civilisation that was the first to end slavery, so look a little harder for your targets to condemn.

As a reminder, when I asked you, point blank, if you think that people should be able to make decisions without accepting responsibility for their actions, you said, “yes”.

The question I answered "yes" was this:

Will you address the other half of my post?

Yes. And who are you to be the arbiter of what is responsible and irresponsible? If you make a bad decision, why should a stranger bail you out against their will?

Ah yes, getting old, that famous choice everyone decides to make. Get a grip. Learn how human bodies work.

And old people are welcome to take the jab. If I were old and in declining health, I'd likely take it.

I can only work with what you give me. That I am responding to third rate arguments is not to be laid at my door.

Might want to improve your comprehension.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

Bob FosseToday  07:06 pm JST

I don't have a problem with people volunteering to get vaccinated, but it must not be forced.

You’ve lost me again, what was the Auschwitz connection?

Think about it. All about consent.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

I’m anti-capitalist, actually.

You might want to look up the USSR and Eastern Bloc, China, Cuba, Kampuchea, North Korea. Millions upon millions starved or murdered because their leaders claimed what they were doing was for the greater good. Personal responsibility was removed from the equation because the state claimed to know best, but there were no consequences for the leaders when they screwed up. They passed the buck to the people. Didn't end well.

I remember when the right advocated personal responsibility. Now they only advocate selfish hedonism. Sad.

I think you don't really understand the concept of personal responsibility. It involves weighing risks, rewards and consequences. Some people choose hedonism, but that's a pretty minor percentage. Many of us just know when we're being fed a line and want no part of it.

I’m someone who thinks that actions have consequences, and that you should live with the consequences of your actions. You disagree.

Actually, I don't disagree. I eat good food and get plenty of exercise, hence my good health. And there are huge numbers of people who do the same, hence their very low likelihood of getting sick or wore from this virus. You must know that almost everyone who has become very ill or passed away from it has been either very old and highly vulnerable to any condition, and or comorbidites that have weakened their immune system. If they take a vaccine for it, they'll be essentially fully protected if the PR is to be believed. For people who can't take a vaccine, there are other ways to protect themselves.

I am advocating against “bailing them out” of this bad decision by restricting their movements.

Speaking of incoherent...

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

Lazarus KnowsToday  06:46 pm JST

Well we're going to have to agree to disagree.

Will you address the other half of my post? Do you think people should be allowed to act irresponsibly, yet not face the consequences of their actions?

Yes. And who are you to be the arbiter of what is responsible and irresponsible? If you make a bad decision, why should a stranger bail you out against their will?

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

Lazarus KnowsToday  06:41 pm JST

For something like smallpox or polio could be be swayed, but not for this virus.

It's sad that you think a virus that has killed millions across the world should be allowed to spread without resistance. I thought better of you.

Given that people pushing ideology you support has killed tens of millions ostensibly for the greater good, I find it hard to the lament seriously. I don't have a problem with people volunteering to get vaccinated, but it must not be forced.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

I'm not Bob, but (as above) I think people should be mandated to take the vaccine.

Well we're going to have to agree to disagree.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

Lazarus KnowsToday  06:28 pm JST

To be clear: I agree with state-mandated vaccinations for preventable diseases common to your country. Those needed to go abroad should be dirt cheap. This obviously does not apply to those who are allergic to vaccines, or who have other legitimate reasons not to take them (and "Qanon told me Bill Gates will turn me into a frog" doesn't count).

For something like smallpox or polio could be be swayed, but not for this virus.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

Bob FosseToday  06:18 pm JST

A quick reminder though.

A vaccination that is available to you HAS been approved. Also nobody is forcing you to take it. So, there’s that.

So do you think everyone should be punished through exclusion from daily life for not getting vaccinated if they're at very low risk of getting sick from this virus?

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Posted in: Australia blames EU supply issues for slow vaccine rollout See in context

AZ has already made deals with Australia, Japan, South Korea and others, but is limiting the amount produced because it makes more selling it's own production.

But this wasn't supposed to be about the money, right? It's all about "humanitarianism."

Did I mention there's a bridge for sale across Sydney Harbor? PM me if you're interested.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

You're missing the point. The principle behind this comes from Joseph Mengele's medical experiments on people without their consent. 

You are bringing up an interesting point. I also find that the idea of having a vaccine passport is somewhat reminiscent of the slogan "Work sets you free" from that period of time - "Vaccination sets you free!"

Just jaw dropping, the mental mental-gymnastics some people will try to justify their theories.

So you don't mind forced vaccination without consent with vaccines that have not been fully approved yet?

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Posted in: Osaka declares COVID medical emergency with 878 new cases See in context

carpslidyToday  03:12 pm JST

why I am and an ever increasing number of people no longer take these Medical groups seriously

75%+hospitals refuse to treat coronavirus.

One can only claim the sky is falling a certain amount of times before people wake up to discover it's still wherein should be.

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Posted in: The coronavirus crisis has been going on for a year now, but the authorities just keep doing the same thing over and over again. Rather than restricting our business hours, it would be more helpful economically if they reduced restaurants' capacity to 30-50% or something like that. I want them to think up a smart way to do things. See in context

Raw BeerToday  01:28 pm JST

A business can take their own measures and costumers can enter or avoid businesses that they find safe for them...

You must be referring to the old days, when people had to think for themselves. Thanks to a virus, that's all changed for the better.

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Posted in: The coronavirus crisis has been going on for a year now, but the authorities just keep doing the same thing over and over again. Rather than restricting our business hours, it would be more helpful economically if they reduced restaurants' capacity to 30-50% or something like that. I want them to think up a smart way to do things. See in context

Raw BeerToday  01:28 pm JST

Reducing capacity in a 100 person capacity restaurant to 50% sounds Ok now do the same in all the local Ramen, sushi, etc... counter type places near my home and that would mean 2 to 3 max at a time.

The problem I see with having a government dictating the measures is that each business is different. A one-size-fits-all rule can be easy for some to implement, but difficult or impossible for others.

A business can take their own measures and costumers can enter or avoid businesses that they find safe for them...

If a government can't implement a blunt instrument that ends up creating more problems than it solves, what's the point of its existence?

Oh, wait...

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Posted in: Osaka declares COVID medical emergency with 878 new cases See in context

blue in greenToday  02:20 pm JST

Make HCQ available.

It can treat this virus if a person has to stay at home, so this angst and fear can stop.

It is FDA approved, it is safe, cheap, good for all ages, it works.

Make medi-packs of it with Vit D, Zinc, available!

That's not allowed. Can't make enough money off it.

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Posted in: WHO does not back vaccination passports for now See in context

You're busy trying to muddy the waters with a syringe full of sophism. Where do you draw the line between what a government can and can't enforce?

so if vaccines reduces the risk in general and also in particular for everybody that is vaccinated then it can be enforced without any ethical or moral problem.

So by this logic, a government could mandate any vaccine because it reduces the risk in general. The utilitarian argument, and one that's been used by tyrants to justify their actions "for the greater good." If that's the case, shouldn't they mandate vaccines for influenza, rubella, hepatitis, pertussis and the like? By your reasoning, whey should, because some people might die if they don't.

Basically everything we do in life carries some sort of risk, and risk levels differ for different situations. Part of being a human being is having the agency to weigh up one's own risks and consequences, and giving away that agency for a false sense of security is highly dangerous to that balance of power between individuals and the state. For the millionth time, I'm fine with people voluntarily taking whatever vaccine if it actually protects them or makes them feel safe. But that doesn't mean a government has the moral or ethical right to enforce people to take it against their will, lest they can't participate in everyday life. If the vaccines are as safe effective as claimed, then those who have had the jab have nothing to worry about. You take away a person's right to choose, you open the door to tyranny, even if just a crack.

Your mistake is like calling a 60yo a highschooler just because he never was accepted in an university. 

Your mistake is creating a meaningless analogy. Vaccines for diseases like yellow fever, pertussis, measles etc. have been around for a long time and proved to be safe. I don't have a problem with them, and there is no need to prove vaccination against them to participate in everyday life. These COVID-19 vaccines are brand new, and even European governments are expressing reservations about the AZ one due to concerns about blood clotting. Whether the vaccine causes the clotting needs to be investigated, don't you agree? People are welcome to take part in the trials, but more effort needs to be made to emphasize that these vaccines are still effectively in the trial stage. But that won't suit the interests of some.

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