lgjhere comments

Posted in: Dream big: Japanese students seek new paths to overseas study See in context

Sadly, Trump's contentious issue is yet one more thing that makes being an international student away from home difficult, compounded by our complex culture and language problems. Welcoming and assimilation assistance must come from numerous sources, including the White House, to aid these young people embarking on life’s journey.

  Most struggle in their efforts and need guidance from schools’ international departments, immigration protection, host families, concerned neighbors and fellow students, and even informative books to extend a cultural helping hand.

  Something that might help anyone coming to the US is the award-winning worldwide book/ebook "What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to Understand Crazy American Culture, People, Government, Business, Language and More.”

  Used in foreign Fulbright student programs and endorsed worldwide by ambassadors, educators, and editors, it identifies how “foreigners” have become successful in the US, including students.    

  It explains how to cope with a confusing new culture and friendship process, and daunting classroom differences. It explains how US businesses operate and how to get a job (which differs from most countries), a must for those who want to work with/for an American firm here or overseas.

  It also identifies the most common English grammar and speech problems foreigners have and tips for easily overcoming them, the number one stumbling block they say they have to succeeding here.

  Good luck to all wherever you study or wherever you come from, because that is the TRUE spirit of the American PEOPLE, not a few in government who shout the loudest! Supporters of int’l students must shout louder.

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Posted in: Bringing the concept of 'real life' English into the classroom See in context

I taught on a university campus in China and found that both our music and movies are great teaching tools. In China, students are reluctant to ask or answer questions in class...a cultural thing that can be frustrating to a teacher. One day I showed the romantic Julia Roberts' (they love her there!) movie "Nottingham Hill" and would stop in the middle of a scene and ask questions about it and have them comment on it, which helped motivate them to speak up. And at times I would ask for volunteers to act out the same little scene in their own words, and again they were motivated.

  I also showed "My Fair Lady," the story of a vagrant English woman learning to speak like the queen. I had them memorize and speak the famous line "The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain" with the same queenly accent as Audrey Hepburn did. That motivated them as we applauded their efforts...more confidence building.

  I also had my students sing along with some famous recorded music that I talk about in my new worldwide book/ebook "What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to Understand Crazy American Culture, People, Government, Business, Language and More.” Endorsed by ambassadors, educators, and editors, it has chapters on English grammar and speech that identify the key problems common to foreigners (and Americans!) and how they can polish their communication skills. Love of music is universal, especially with students, so tying in learning English with music is a GREAT motivator.

  Here are several quotes from the book. "Hint: I use recorded music by American singer Nat King Cole in my classes for students to sing along with him. His diction is distinct and the songs are slow. I have seen his CDs in shops overseas, so I know they are available. If not, listen on the Internet or purchase an audio CD or MP3 download from Amazon.com at http://amzn.to/KingCole."

  This excerpt relates to elongating one's vowels, a common problem around the world: "☺Here’s another assignment. Search the Internet for “Sinatra – All My Tomorrows.” Listen to how this famous American singer elongated his words—especially vowel sounds—to give added importance, rhythm, and clarity. Sing or speak along with him to practice the same effect. Nice, huh? He mined for gold in his words. In music circles, Sinatra was known for what they call his “phrasing,” which is really what we’ve been talking about in this section."

   Good luck to all who want to learn one of the world's most difficult languages.

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Posted in: Why do Japanese change their attitude when they communicate with foreigners? See in context

A new award-winning worldwide book/ebook that helps explain America is "What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to Understand Crazy American Culture, People, Government, Business, Language and More.” It paints a revealing picture of America for anyone who will benefit from a better understanding. Endorsed by ambassadors, educators, and editors, it also informs those who want to learn more about the last remaining superpower and how we compare to other nations on many issues, Including Japan. I'm not sure the comments directed toward Japan are not applicable to other countries as well. The people there are very friendly toward foreigners, as I learned in the subway when I tried to get the gate to open and a dozen people came to my aid along with the station attendent to fix the turnstile. In two weeks travel there, never once did I see any grafitti or litter, nor did I hear any horn honking. It is a most traditional and respectful society, something that most countries could use a good enfusion of, including the US. Here’s a closing quote from the book’s Intro: “With all of our cultural differences though, you’ll be surprised to learn how much…we as human beings have in common on this little third rock from the sun. After all, the song played at our Disneyland parks around the world is ‘It’s A Small World After All.’ Peace.”

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Posted in: What do foreigners find strange about Japan? NTV finds out See in context

A great new book that explains these cultural differences - "What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to understanding crazy American culture, people, government, business, language and more."

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Posted in: Why do Japanese change their attitude when they communicate with foreigners? See in context

A great new book that explains differences between America and other cultures, especially Japan, - "What Foreigners Need To Know About America From A To Z: How to understand crazy American culture, people, government, business, language and more."

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