Mark Klemola comments

Posted in: Ichiro heads into final year with Mariners See in context

"well I've heard a lot of things about his clubhouse demeanor. supposedly distant, aloof, arrogant etc. I think he is one of the greatest players in history, but his attitude stinks I heard."

This often the quick judgement of the man, also note comments above alluding to his lack of learning ability. It has been discussed quietly in the media that he suffers from Autism or possibly Aspergers. This has never been officially commented upon by his management. If true it makes his accomplishments even more significant than they appear to be.

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Posted in: Lady Gaga world tour to kick off in Seoul See in context

Lady Gaga makes me want to listen to WENDY O WILLIAMS.

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Posted in: Luxury lands in Okinawa at last See in context

MaboDofuIsSpicy - I'm afraid I have to agree with you. I don't understand how a place with so much potential consistently falls short.

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Posted in: Two more arrests made over death of Nepalese man in Osaka See in context

http://news.tbs.co.jp/20120122/newseye/tbs_newseye4933493.html

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Posted in: Nikon D3100 See in context

US: $699 UK: £579.99 EU: €599

Ability to shoot Raw 1080 HD movies HDMI output

Nice.

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Posted in: Roughed up by the cops in Shinjuku See in context

There is a lot of discussion of this kind of issue in Canada right now. In the Western world (at least) there has been a noticeable change in attitudes by the citizenry towards figures of authority. In Canada it has been discussed for a while now that people are not giving the police the respect required for the police to carry out their jobs in an effective manner. This has caused all sorts of problems with police having to use more force to control situations. More force means more suspicion. The citizenry has become more and more skeptical of authority figures in general, perhaps due to scandal, misuse of power, etc... or perhaps it's just a result of degrading belief in a standard of moral values and manners (many people seem to feel that things do not exist or are not necessary in a modern society). Often the public perception does not match reality, the public tends to be easily misled and manipulated by emotion rather than fact. There have been many cases of police abuse, and corruption, PROVEN IN COURT, but it has to be recognized that if you take those incidents as a percentage of total police contact incidents with the public, the percentage of negative contact is very low, less than .05% (in Canada). From this we can draw the conclusion that police are extremely well trained and professional in the way they carry out their duty, yet the public insist that they know best in an arena in which they have no professional training. If a police officer presents you with identification you are obliged to cooperate according to the rules employed by the specific country. Often the suspicious or hostile nature of a public citizen escalates a situation beyond any real or perceived threat. I have had one incident with police in Japan and found them to be extremely professional, appearing to be nothing but friendly, and with my cooperation, they assessed the situation quickly and without difficulty to me (as compared to my one police incident in India, LOL!).

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