COVID-19 INFORMATION What you need to know about the coronavirus if you are living in Japan or planning a visit.

Paul Laimal-Convoy comments

Posted in: Japan aims to fast-track review of anti-viral drug remdesivir See in context

@finto

You wrote (and edited for legibility) : -

"I keep reading here how ignoring testing everyone will kill us all, but in the coming weeks/for the past two months we are still here.

We all can compare data on deaths in various countries. Considering Japan had the highest cases after China in early February, does this mean anything to you guys? "

If you've "been reading here", you might have read links or quotes, that have repeatedly challenged your notions, such as these ones, below:

"Meanwhile, Japan is only using a sixth of its capacity even as it is increasing its ability to do so, government data shows. Japan’s health ministry has been focusing on clusters of cases, with the biggest around the megacities of Osaka and Tokyo, and in the prefectures of Hyogo, Hokkaido and Aichi. But with the rate of testing low, unseen clusters may be emerging elsewhere in the country."

(Source: - https://graphics.reuters.com/HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS-GLOBAL-TESTING/0100B5LC45H/ )

"...on 10 March, the picture in Japan changed. It had 59 new cases of coronavirus infection, the biggest rise in a signle day since the start of the outbreak, public broadcaster NHK said. Two weeks later, the spike has become near-daily, with 45 new diagnoses confirmed on Thursday, making it the second straight day with 40 or more new confirmed cases.

While testing seemed unimportant when the outbreak was low, now authorities have not been able to track all the contacts of more than half the newest cases, leading to more severe restrictions..."

(Source: - https://inews.co.uk/news/coronavirus-japan-deaths-cases-covid-19-lockdown-measures-why-measures-2521139 )

"The Japan conundrum is just the fact that if you don't test for it, you're not going to find a lot of cases," says Jason Kindrachuk, PhD, an assistant professor of viral pathogenesis at the University of Manitoba. Kindrachuk isn't the only one who suspects underreporting.

Kenji Shibuya, former chief of health policy at the World Health Organization, told Bloomberg that Japan has either "contained the spread by focusing on outbreak clusters, or ... there are outbreaks yet to be found."

With a population of over 126 million, the country has conducted 32,125 tests over the past month. However, because some people are tested multiple times, Japan has actually only tested 16,484 individuals — or about one test per 7,600 people.

In comparison, South Korea, with a population of over 50 million, seemingly slowed the spread of the virus by testing more than 270,000 people — one test per 185 people — through a well-organized program..."

(Source: - https://www.businessinsider.com/why-japan-cases-of-coronavirus-are-so-low-2020-3?op=1 )

You wrote (and edited for legibility) : -

"Back in February, most of you guys were quoting CDC guidelines on mask wearing, saying they were useless; now what can you say about them?"

I would say exactly the same thing that I, and others have stated; that different types of masks offer some protection, but are a secondary or tertiary measure, and sod be used alongside proper hand-washing, social distancing and/or other preventative measures, as stipulated by the WHO and/or other official medical/governmental organisations.

Masks can cause infection or spread by incorrect use/disposal and/or, with some masks, priority should be given to essential/emergency workers and/or those in close proximity to those most at risk. Furthermore, basic cotton masks offer little or no protection to "aerosol" based viruses, including Covid 19, but offer some protection from viruses in water droplets.

For more information, check out these links: - https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/when-and-how-to-use-masks

https://www.businessinsider.com/types-of-masks-used-for-coronavirus-outbreak-n95-surgical-2020-3?op=1

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/health-51881555/coronavirus-do-face-masks-actually-work

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P27HRClMf2U&feature=youtu.be#

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Abe seeks to extend state of emergency by about a month See in context

@Hervé L'Eisa

"The better example to follow would be Sweden. They are nearing herd immunity already. Yes, they've had a higher number of deaths, but still within winter pneumonia levels and mostly with the least likely to survive any other illness groups."

Incorrect.

"Over 100 countries have issued a full or partial lockdown as the world fights the coronavirus pandemic. But one nation has taken the unusual step of continuing to have schools, shops and pubs open, albeit with some social distancing measures. Sweden’s Chief Epidemiologist Anders Tegnell maintains this is the right approach for the Swedish people, but the decision is not with its detractors. And more than 2000 people have died of Covid-19 there, compared to a combined total of fewer than 800 from neighbours Denmark, Norway and Finland - all of whom locked down..."

(Full story in video: - https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pzzVxw5FyYs&feature=youtu.be# )

"Some of the country’s leading medical professors and academics have been fiercely critical of the decision not to follow much of the rest of Europe into strict lockdown, publishing open letters and petitions calling for an urgent change of course and highlighting a death toll which, at 2,194, is three times the per-million tally recorded in Denmark and Germany and more than six times that of Finland...

> ...Despite avoiding total lockdown, Sweden’s heavily export-dependent economy has been as hard hit by the pandemic as most countries. The government has launched relief measures worth about 100bn kronor (£8bn) but still expects GDP to contract by up to 10% this year. Unemployment is already surging..." (Source: - https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/27/dont-judge-swedens-light-touch-on-covid-19-yet-says-minister )

"Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s chief epidemiologist overseeing the government’s response to COVID-19 has said the government should allow the virus to spread slowly through the population, an approach initially employed by the [UK] and the Netherlands before [they] rapidly changed strategy [due to] evidence that this....would...overburden health care systems. Tegnell [stated] COVID-19 could be stopped by “herd immunity or a combination of immunity and vaccination.” (A vaccine for COVID-19 is likely at least 14 months away.)

> [However] “Herd immunity doesn’t make sense because we don’t know whether or not you can become immune,” says Nele Brusselaers, an associate professor of clinical epidemiology. She added, “this is a virus that can kill anybody.”

> At the end of March, 2,300 doctors, scientists and academics signed an open letter to the government calling for stricter measures. “We think there is no scientific evidence for their strategy,” says Cecilia Söderberg-Nauclér, an expert in microbial pathogenesis who signed the letter. She says the government has been reluctant to share its data with scientists, leading her to believe that the government’s strategy is “not based on evidence.”

> Carina King, an infectious diseases epidemiologist, agrees that the government’s lack of transparency makes it “really hard to give proper scientific thoughts on their approach because they haven’t released their science.” She added that the government has made no concrete efforts to test, contact trace and quarantine—as South Korea did—which is standard protocol to stop localized spread at the beginning of an outbreak..."

(Source: - https://time.com/5817412/sweden-coronavirus/ )

In the article above, we can see some parallels with Japan, such as a lack of testing, poor social distancing/lockdown implementation and a lack of transparency with the press/scientists/etc.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Posted in: Japan preparing to extend coronavirus emergency for about a month See in context

@Objective

"To date, a lock down has never been necessary in Japan. The virus has been here since January... etc... etc..'

Incorrect.

"The strict constraints on testing for the virus by Japanese health authorities have drawn accusations from critics such as Masahiro Kami, a hematologistand director of the Medical Governance Research Institute, towards Abe of wanting to "downplay the number of infections or patients because of the upcoming Olympics." Reports that only a small select number of public health facilities were authorized to test for the virus, after which the results could only be processed by five government-approved companies, has created a bottleneck where clinics have been forced to turn away even patients who had high fevers. This has led some experts to question Japan's official case numbers..."

(Source: - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_responses_to_the_2019–20_coronavirus_pandemic#Japanese_government )

"With a population of over 126 million, the country has conducted 32,125 tests over the past month. However, because some people are tested multiple times, Japan has actually only tested 16,484 individuals — or about one test per 7,600 people. In comparison, South Korea, with a population of over 50 million, seemingly slowed the spread of the virus by testing more than 270,000 people — one test per 185 people — through a well-organized program."

(Source: - https://www.businessinsider.com/why-japan-cases-of-coronavirus-are-so-low-2020-3 )

"Other basic information is kept from the public without any explanation. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government has a COVID-19 web page and seems to be promoting transparency by putting out the daily number of the infected. However, it won’t tell you how many people asked to be tested or how many people were actually tested; basic data is lacking so that the numbers have no context. The same is true of the statistics released by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. There seems to be no interest in getting an indication of the prevalence of the virus in Japanese society"

(Source: - https://www.thedailybeast.com/japans-covid-19-state-of-emergency-locks-down-criticism?ref=scroll )

"...What it shows is Japan is only testing people who are already quite sick. In fact, the official guidelines for doctors say they should only recommend a test if the patient has pneumonia. That is the reason why the level of testing actually done in Japan is about half of the capacity according to a health ministry official, even weeks after the government has started to ramp up its testing...

> ...Jordain Haley is an American working in Japan as a business analyst and volunteer translator. Via Skype she told me what happened when she helped a friend, who doesn't speak fluent Japanese, to get a test...."She must use the side entrance." Jordain was told. "She must not tell anyone where this testing is taking place. It could cause a commotion."...

> ..."Japan is identifying those who really need help and its medical care is excellent, and that's why so few are dying." This is not untrue according to Professor Kenji Shibuya of Kings College London. "From the physician's point of view, it makes sense," he says. "Forget about mild cases, focus on cases with major symptoms and save lives. Focus testing on those who have symptoms."

> But, says Professor Shibuya, from a public health point of view, Japan's refusal to test more widely is incredibly risky. He points to a study done by Keio University in Tokyo. Last week, the University hospital published a study of Covid tests done on patients admitted for non-Covid related illnesses and procedures. It found that around 6% of them tested positive for Covid-19. It is a small sample and not "generalisable".

> But Professor Shibuya still describes it as "very shocking". "We are definitely missing a lot of asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic cases," he says. "There is clearly widespread community transmission. I am very worried by this situation.".."

(Source: - https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-52466834 )

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Posted in: Many Japanese defy appeals to stay home to curb virus See in context

My flat overlooks a local park. It was busy with gangs of kids, joggers and the occasional tent. Below my room, a group of old women were standing together, chatting while their dogs yapped.

No, social distancing is NOT being followed, at least in my neighborhood, by a very ignorant and selfish minority.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Posted in: Japan preparing to extend coronavirus emergency for about a month See in context

Hervé L'EisaToday  

"Do NOT extend the stupid "State of Emergency". Economic suicide over an illness that has linked to far fewer deaths than the seasonal influenza!"

Incorrect:

"Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has similar symptoms to the flu. They also spread in similar ways. So it's natural to want to compare the two. But Covid-19 is very different, in ways that make it much more dangerous. And understanding how is key to understanding why we have to take it so seriously."

(Video link: - https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=FVIGhz3uwuQ )

For more information:

https://heavy.com/news/2020/02/coronavirus-death-rate-vs-flu/

https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-similarities-and-differences-covid-19-and-influenza

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Posted in: Japan preparing to extend coronavirus emergency for about a month See in context

@noriahojanen

Actually, countries that have decided to take limited steps up open up have been criticised:

https://www.vox.com/2020/4/10/21215317/coronavirus-europe-lockdown-denmark-austria-czech-republic

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/04/14/countries-risk-second-wave-of-coronavirus-infections-by-easing-restrictions-too-early-says-expert.html

Also, the US is NOT "opening up", but rather certain parts are, most notably part of Georgia, which even President Trump has criticised as being "too early":

https://youtu.be/XYwSfrHH-1s

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Posted in: In cash-loving Japan, banks still busy despite coronavirus See in context

AlexBecu wrote:

"...Look at facts and look at the numbers..."

Okay, please supply some. In the meantime, I'll supply some, relating to your opinions.

AlexBecu wrote:

"...Japan compared to many other countries has done well. The numbers speak for themselves and we didn't use the same drastic and harsh measures as others have..."

Incorrect.

1/ "A state of emergency was declared in Hokkaido, Japan, weeks after the Sapporo Snow Festival had two million visitors. CNN's Blake Essig speaks with experts who are critical of the Japanese government's handling of the coronavirus outbreak."

(Video Source: - https://edition.cnn.com/videos/world/2020/03/10/japan-coronavirus-covid-19-no-problemism-hokkaido-snow-festival-intl-hnk-vpx.cnn )

2/ "...With a population of over 126 million, the country has conducted 32,125 tests over the past month. However, because some people are tested multiple times, Japan has actually only tested 16,484 individuals — or about one test per 7,600 people.

> In comparison, South Korea, with a population of over 50 million, seemingly slowed the spread of the virus by testing more than 270,000 people — one test per 185 people — through a well-organized program..."

(Source: - https://www.businessinsider.com/why-japan-cases-of-coronavirus-are-so-low-2020-3?op=1 )

3/ "...Much of the data about the coronavirus epidemic and covid-19 is flawed. It is collected and reported in different ways by different countries, and almost certainly undercounts the number of cases and deaths..."

(Video Source: - https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=O-3Mlj3MQ_Q )

The video above cites Japanese statistics of an example of "underreporting" the (possibly larger) results.

4/ "...For weeks Japan has limited its testing for the coronavirus, which emerged in neighboring China late last year, despite calls from many health experts who see testing as vital to detecting and isolating cases and slowing the spread.

> Japan conducted about 52,000 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests in March, or just 16% of the number carried out in South Korea, according to data from Oxford University..."

(Source: - https://japantoday.com/category/national/as-coronavirus-infections-mount-japan-at-last-expands-testing )

AlexBecu wrote:

"Staying vigilant, aware and taking basic health steps should be the new normal for the foreseeable future."

Indeed, as cited by the following:

-https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

I DO hope you are engaging in social distancing, cleaning your hands regularly and/or staying at home as much as possible?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Posted in: On Japan's stretched frontline, doctors and nurses face long fight against coronavirus See in context

The BBC made a video report about a "makeshift" Covid-19 centre, created recently in Japan:

"Until recently, Japan had been one of the success stories in controlling the spread of Covid-19. In February and March, Japan succeeded in suppressing early cluster outbreaks, and in keeping total infections in the hundreds. But now the capital Tokyo appears to have a developing epidemic with more than 3,500 cases confirmed. Countrywide there are now more than 12,000 cases.

> Doctors in Tokyo say a state of emergency, declared two weeks ago, is not slowing the spread of the virus enough to stop new cases overwhelming the hospital system.

Rupert Wingfield-Hayes and the BBC's Tokyo team have been inside...[St Marianna Hospital, Kawasaki]...south of the capital, which has built a makeshift Covid-19 unit in just 10 days, to try to deal with the overflow."

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=R8GMs6N3vN4

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: In cash-loving Japan, banks still busy despite coronavirus See in context

Part of the responsibility for not being cash-based falls on the shoulders of the banks/credit card associations (sic)/government. If they made it possible for more smaller businesses to adopt credit card transactions (without incurring expensive transaction fees), then I believe more people would use them.

Regardless, Japanese banks are light years behind in most areas, compared to other developed countries. The one area I've cited to a British bank (HSBC) that (many) Japanese banks/financial services offer (and which "The World's Biggest Bank" did not, at the time), is in multilingual GUIs for cash-point machines.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Posted in: With new 'English Online Banking' service, Sony Bank rises to say that Japan finally has a bank for foreign residents in Japan See in context

@zichi

You can't use the National Health service without your health insurance card and would have to pay the full 100% of charges. Also the same for drugs. I have had a card like so many others for 30 years.

Good for you. However, there are foreigners, in their first year in Japan, that do not (and may use private health insurance and/or coverage from home). There might even be poorer foreigners in Japan (from developing countries and/or working for wages less than eikaiwa, etc)

Regardless, that's not my point. My point was that a health insurance card is irrelevant to setting up a bank account, especially for foreigners, many of which may not have one, thus making this new bank, aimed at foreigners, irrelevant to them.

It's akin to opening up a restaurant, aimed mainly at women, and installing only urinals in the toilets.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Posted in: Loyal customers try to keep their local eateries afloat during pandemic See in context

I think most people want local businesses to survive (and even bigger businesses). There was an American company that recently donated (tax?) money to smaller restaurants, due to the US government not doing enough.

It's great that people are also supporting local businesses with crowdfunding, and it might be that SOME restaurants are staying open to serve essential workers too.

However, places staying open, during a global pandemic, where the global consensus has been to test more, report more, treat more and socially distance more is what people like myself are concerned with. Supporting local businesses is one thing (and a good thing too), but izakayas run, and full of, selfish, ignorant people, helping to spread a deadly virus, is a another thing entirely.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Osaka to name and shame more pachinko parlors defying closure request See in context

"Even a child should be able to understand that those places are breeding grounds for the virus - crowded, closed in, and with close contact," wrote Twitter user Akashinomadai. "

Except the clientele at pachinko parlours lack even the intelligence of children.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Posted in: Japan faces bed shortage in ICUs if pandemic peaks: study See in context

Also, here's a BBC video link to "behind the scenes" at a Covid-19 treatment centre in Japan:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=R8GMs6N3vN4

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Japan faces bed shortage in ICUs if pandemic peaks: study See in context

No Business

"For goodness sake, can we stop with the constant hysteria? This isn’t Ebola."

Ebola was extremely deadly, killing up to 50 percent of those who got sick. But because it predominantly spread through bodily fluids like sweat and blood during the last stages of the disease, it wasn’t as contagious as COVID-19.

Plus, because symptoms were so severe, health officials were able to quickly identify those who’d been in contact with people who had it and isolate them.

(Source: - https://www.healthline.com/health-news/how-deadly-is-the-coronavirus-compared-to-past-outbreaks#20142016-Ebola )

The Ebola virus disease (EVD) first struck in 1976 and there have been occasional outbreaks in the decades since, primarily in Africa. In 2014, the virus killed over 11,000 people in West Africa.

While more lethal, Ebola is considered less contagious than coronavirus and is transmitted mainly by bodily fluids (coronavirus can be spread through droplets from coughs and sneezes).

(Source: - The Ebola virus disease (EVD) first struck in 1976 and there have been occasional outbreaks in the decades since, primarily in Africa. In 2014, the virus killed over 11,000 people in West Africa.

While more lethal, Ebola is considered less contagious than coronavirus and is transmitted mainly by bodily fluids (coronavirus can be spread through droplets from coughs and sneezes) )

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Posted in: Tokyo governor asks residents to grocery shop only every 3 days See in context

Jacek Adamczyk wrote:

"Deadly virus?"

"Definition of deadly

1: likely to cause or capable of producing death [e.g., deadly poison]"

(Source:- https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deadly )

-

"As of April 23, 2020, the outbreak of thecoronavirus disease (COVID-19) had spread to six continents, and approximately 184,249 people had died after contracting the respiratory virus. Around 25,085 of these deaths occurred in Italy."

(Source: - https://www.statista.com/statistics/1093256/novel-coronavirus-2019ncov-deaths-worldwide-by-country/ )

Jacek Adamczyk wrote:

"80 percent of people infected have NO symptoms..."

"About 80% of people get a VERY MILD illness and they recover uneventfully. That's important to realize," said Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency medicine physician with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. An additional 15% of people infected with coronavirus have more serious symptoms, and 5% develop life-threatening illness, experts note."

(Source: - https://www.newsmax.com/t/health/article/959868?section=health-news&keywords=virus-symptoms-recovery&year=2020&month=03&date=25&id=959868&oref=duckduckgo.com )

"80% of COVID-19 patients experience 'mild' symptoms — but that likely still involves a fever and cough..."

(Source: - https://www.businessinsider.com/what-coronavirus-mild-symptoms-are-fever-2020-3?op=1 )

Jacek Adamczyk wrote:

"People who are mostly older and/or with preexisting illnesses, for them it may be deadly in some cases..."

"At least 759 people under the age of 50 have died in the U.S. from the virus that causes COVID-19, The Washington Post reported Wednesday. At least 45 of those deaths were among people in their 20s and at least 190 among people in their 30s, the paper said. Even patients under the age of 20 have not been spared. The Post said at least 9 people in the U.S. who were 20 or younger have died because of the illness."

(Source: - https://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_5e8ebea0c5b6b371812bf71a )

"The age of the infant, who lived in Cook County, has not been released. This isn't the first death in an infant confirmed to have COVID-19. In China, a 10-month-old with the disease, died 4 weeks after being admitted to the Wuhan Children's Hospital, according to a March 18 report published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Though as the pandemic unfolds, doctors are realizing that no age group is immune to the virus nor to its severe health effects, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus still appears to be more severe in older adults..."

(Source: - https://www.livescience.com/us-infant-dies-coronavirus.html )

"A 13-year-old boy who tested positive for coronavirus has died, a London hospital trust has said. Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab, from Brixton in south London, died in King's College Hospital early on Monday. He is thought to be the youngest person to have died with the virus in the UK...[and] he had no apparent underlying health conditions and tested positive for Covid-19..."

(Source: - https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-52114476 )

"If children are infected yet have milder symptoms, they may still play a critical role in COVID-19 transmission. Children are mobile, shed large volume of virus, congregate in groups and are at lower risk of severe disease so often maintain their daily activities. Preventing school-age children getting infected with influenza has been shown to be an effective community prevention strategy..."

(Source: - https://www.sciencealert.com/if-you-re-worried-about-children-catching-coronavirus-here-s-what-you-need-to-know )

Jacek Adamczyk wrote:

"...but we are not talking about Ebola here..."

"The Ebola virus disease (EVD) first struck in 1976 and there have been occasional outbreaks in the decades since, primarily in Africa. In 2014, the virus killed over 11,000 people in West Africa. While more lethal, Ebola is considered less contagious than coronavirus and is transmitted mainly by bodily fluids (coronavirus can be spread through droplets from coughs and sneezes)."

(Source: - https://www.healthcentral.com/article/coronavirus-vs-other-pandemics )

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Posted in: With new 'English Online Banking' service, Sony Bank rises to say that Japan finally has a bank for foreign residents in Japan See in context

No need to use a health insurance card, as many foreigners haven't got one (especially first/one year workers).

This "bank" looks similar to City Bank; basically only for rich ex-pats, working in high-level business, such as banking, investment, etc.

It doesn't appear to be useful, or flexible for most foreigners.

Easy pass.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Hospitals turning away sick people as coronavirus cases surge See in context

@WilliB

"None of the lock-down screamers [have] yet given a clear answer."

1/ Japan isn't on "lockdown":

"Under the law, the Japanese government does not have the authority enforce citywide lockdowns. Apart from individual quarantine measures, officials cannot restrict the movement of people in order to contain the virus. Consequently, compliance with government requests to restrict movements is based on "asking for public cooperation to ‘protect people’s lives’ and minimize further damage to [the economy]".

(Source: - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Japan )

"I keep hearing these calls for more lockdown, but what EXACTLY do you want, in addition to what is being done already?"

2/ People have asked, funnily enough, for more testing, more treatment and an ACTUAL lockdown, plus more social/legal pressure to socially distance, plus ALL of these measures in a swift and efficient manner:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Japan#Controversies_and_criticisms

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Posted in: Many organizations that were not ready, not prepared, are being forced to do telework, which is causing lots of trouble. See in context

At our international school (kindergarten), we have to make pre-recorded content, upload newsletters and additional worksheets, conduct 15-60min individual/group counselling/lessons, have staff meetings, etc. We use Gdrive, Google Docs, Hangouts, Meet, etc and have to use at least a PC and iPad to do it all.

They're continually changing what to do, but that's the nature of the beast, in this climate.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Japanese firms making medical gowns, sanitizer amid virus spread See in context

mmwkdw

"Chinese companies clap their hands in Glee, since they expect that they will be able to produce the same going forward far cheaper than Teijin can...."

That's EXACTLY what Teijin wants EVERY interested business to do, regardless of where they are globally located.

Didn't you understand the article?

"Teijin will upload the gowns' design on its website so that other businesses can follow suit and help in easing the current shortage..."

I mean, you QUOTED the actual part above, and STILL misunderstood it...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Japanese firms making medical gowns, sanitizer amid virus spread See in context

@Yrral

"Japan has one of best anti viral medicine, Avigan, to treat the virus..."

Thanks for the info. Please be aware that currently:

"There's no cure and medical specialists can only treat the symptoms of the disease. Many different treatment options have been proposed and some older drugs seem to be associated with positive outcomes -- but much more work is required. "

(Source: - https://www.cnet.com/how-to/coronavirus-treatments-hydroxychloroquine-vaccines-and-drugs-for-covid-19/ )

Avigan, currenty, is not ready for mass-use, due to inconsistent results in Japan and China:

-"The 35 patients who received the drug in Shenzhen appeared to test negative for coronavirus in a median of four days, compared to 11 days for the 45 who did not receive it...

> ..."We’ve given Avigan to 70 to 80 people [in Japan], but it doesn’t seem to work that well when the virus has already multiplied,” the paper reported an official at Japan’s Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare as saying...As well as suggesting the drug may not be effective in treating more advanced cases of coronavirus, the Japanese official said the drug could cause foetal deformities and should perhaps not be used by pregnant women or those trying to conceive..."

(Source: - https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/coronavirus-treatment-anti-viral-drug-favipiravir-avigan-wuhan-china-a9408066.html )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Hospitals turning away sick people as coronavirus cases surge See in context

@Shinichi Hamada

"...So the number of people who've contracted coronavirus is the wild card. We basically know how many have died from coronavirus (although these numbers may actually be overreported). If far more have or have had the virus than the official stats suggest, then the chances of dying from this are EXTREMELY LOW, possibly similar to or lower..."

I

Incorrect

"Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has similar symptoms to the flu. They also spread in similar ways. So it's natural to want to compare the two. But Covid-19 is very different, in ways that make it much more dangerous. And understanding how is key to understanding why we have to take it so seriously."

Watch the following video to see for yourself why you are wrong on this:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FVIGhz3uwuQ

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Hospitals turning away sick people as coronavirus cases surge See in context

@Peeping_Tom

"Unless you're on your last knees/dead already, NO TESTING FOR YOU AMIGO! NEXT."

Although the UK's testing was not adequate, it was, and still is, significantly better than Japan's:

"The UK government wants to do 100,000 coronavirus tests a day by the end of April, but has faced criticism for not increasing the number more quickly. By mid-April, 21,000 tests were being conducted a day, on 14,000 people...

> ...The UK did not start with the resources to do mass testing, unlike some other countries.

> Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: "We have the best scientific labs in the world but we did not have the scale. My German counterpart for instance could call upon 100 testing labs ready and waiting when the crisis struck."

> The UK government also took a different approach at the beginning of the crisis, using a smaller number of labs and keeping more control centrally..."

(Source: - https://www.bbc.com/news/health-51943612 )

"With a population of over 126 million, the country has conducted 32,125 tests over the past month. However, because some people are tested multiple times, Japan has actually only tested 16,484 individuals — or about one test per 7,600 people.

> In comparison, South Korea, with a population of over 50 million, seemingly slowed the spread of the virus by testing more than 270,000 people — one test per 185 people — through a well-organized program.

> Earlier this week, Reuters reported that Japan is using one-sixth of its total testing capacity. The capacity for testing nationwide is 7,500 a day, but the health ministry says they do not need to exploit it now[.]"

(Source: - https://www.businessinsider.com/why-japan-cases-of-coronavirus-are-so-low-2020-3?op=1 )

"UK HOSPITALS ARE ALSO REJECTING PATIENTS. BY THE THOUSANDS!!!!"

Incorrect:

"You should only leave your home for very limited purposes...medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person...If you need medical help for any reason, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital...for life-threatening emergencies, call 999 for an ambulance.."

(Source: - https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ )

"Medics at Sheffield Teaching NHS Foundation Trust said some patients had "left their symptoms to go on for far too long" because they did not want to overload the NHS or feared they would catch the virus.

> Dr Jennifer Hill, medical director for operations, said: "We would rather people who have serious symptoms take action straight away to allow us to provide the right treatment in a timely way and prevent full-blown life-threatening scenarios like a severe stroke, sepsis or heart attack."

(Source: - https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-52323908 )

In fact, although deplorable, one London hospital admitted to transferring Covid-19 patients to other hospitals, in order to make room for regular patients:

"Lewisham and Greenwich NHS Trust said it has transferred Covid-19 patients to neighbouring hospitals, as demand for lifesaving treatment surges..."

(Source: - https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/19/exclusive-london-hospital-trust-becomes-first-admit-turning/ )

The UK also set up a specialist hospital, to tackle low-level Covid 19 cases, in order to make room for more patients at other hospitals:

"Britain’s first coronavirus field hospital will treat up to 4,000 previously fit and healthy peoplestruck down by Covid-19 once it opens, with sicker patients who are more likely to die being cared for in normal NHS hospitals, according to senior sources with knowledge of the plans."

(Source: - https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/30/nightingale-hospital-in-london-to-treat-less-critical-covid-19-cases )

Please feel free to back up your own claims, with cited sources and other useful information. Oh, and it might help to refrain from using CAPS and excess exclamation marks, too.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Posted in: Hospitals turning away sick people as coronavirus cases surge See in context

@ziggyutah

"...[The] virus existed before December in a bat/ rat/ cat before it escaped at the...wet market in Wuhan...it existed between a Wuhan food source and Wuhan consumer...it even existed in the bio-weapons lab in Wuhan before December...China communist lied about everything..."

There is no evidence to suggest that the lab was used for "bio weapons", nor that the virus was "engineered"

"One online theory, that went viral in January, suggested the virus could have been engineered in a lab as a bioweapon. This allegation has been repeatedly dismissed by scientists, who note that studies show the virus originated in animals - most likely in bats...

> ...[And a] US study of the coronavirus genome published in March found no signs it had been engineered. "By comparing the available genome sequence data for known coronavirus strains, we can firmly determine that SARS-CoV-2 originated through natural processes," co-author Kristian Andersen, from Scripps Research in California, said at the time...

> ...there is currently no evidence that any research institute in Wuhan was the source of Sars-CoV-2...

> ...On Thursday, China foreign ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian addressed the matter at a news conference, telling journalists the World Health Organization's officials "have said multiple times there is no evidence the new coronavirus was created in a laboratory".

(Source: - https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52318539 )

There is a video, which also addresses the same issues:

-

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=rbC8_BxGbjM

Another video, dealing with the origins in Wuhan's "wet market", can be watched here:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TPpoJGYlW54

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Hospitals turning away sick people as coronavirus cases surge See in context

@Dan Lavender

"NHS is massively underfunded & understaffed thanks to years of Tory cut backs!!! free? no !!high taxes pay for it! clueless misinformed people everywhere!!"

Incorrect. The NHS is free to anyone using it, unlike Japan's which requires payment:

"Anyone who lives in Japan must pay into the system according to their income level. And when people go to the doctor they pay about 30 percent of the cost of treatment and drugs out of their own pockets. Some people pay less and a few pay nothing..."

(Source: - https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/08/11/business/japans-health-care-far-free-ballooning-costs-mean-higher-premiums/ )

"Each service provides a comprehensive range of health services, free at the point of use for people ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom, apart from dental treatment and optical care.  In England, NHS patients have to pay prescription charges with a range of exemptions from these charges..."

(Source: - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Health_Service )

True, it is funded by taxes (as it should be) and perhaps it's not as great as it should, but it IS doing a darn-sight better than Japan right now. It's been testing, treating and, admitting more people than Japan's current system.

Take time time to read both articles, and both health-care systems, before posting inaccurate drivel.

Your point is null and void.

Moving on...

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Posted in: Hospitals turning away sick people as coronavirus cases surge See in context

Compare this to the UK, whose free "NHS" (National Health Service), which is already over-stretched (after dealing with the pandemic for longer) :

"Dr Jennifer Hill, medical director for operations, said: "We would rather people who have serious symptoms take action straight away to allow us to provide the right treatment in a timely way and prevent full-blown life-threatening scenarios like a severe stroke, sepsis or heart attack."

( Source: - https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-52323908 )

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Posted in: 60% still go to office despite state of emergency over virus: survey See in context

"We assume many people still have to go to their office because of their duties, such as seal stamping, faxing" and other tasks related to paper documents, a Persol Research official said in analyzing the trend of slow permeation of telework in Japan."

In a world where it's easy to digitally sign PDF files, and even where deliveries to my home in Japan are signed for in tablet devices, there's NO excuse for this.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Abe's wife criticized for group shrine visit See in context

Surely, "Abe's wife must be above suspicion"?

( https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/Caesar%27s+wife+must+be+above+suspicion )

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Keep your distance See in context

It's about bloody time. My local Lawsons has plastic curtains over the tills, but nothing to encourage social distancing.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Posted in: Japan starts 1st weekend under state of emergency as infection cases soar in Tokyo See in context

@RationalReader

"Calm down people. Japan 0.8 deaths per million, US 50 deaths per million, major European countries 120-350 per million. We are much safer here."

The low infection/death rates in Japan have been attributed to a lack of testing.

"The strict constraints on testing for the virus by Japanese health authorities have drawn accusations from critics, such as Masahiro Kami, towards Abe of wanting to "downplay the number of infections or patients because of the upcoming Olympics." Reports that only a small select number of public health facilities were authorized to test for the virus, after which the results could only be processed by five government-approved companies, has created a bottleneck where clinics have been forced to turn away even patients who had high fevers. This has led some experts to question Japan's official case numbers, with Tobias Harris, of Teneo Intelligence in Washington, D.C. stating "You wonder, if they were testing nearly as much as South Korea is testing, what would the actual number be? How many cases are lurking and just aren't being caught?"

(Source: - https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_coronavirus_pandemic_in_Japan )

"...So why is the infection rate relatively low, given Japan’s proximity to China?

The main answer seems to be that Japan has not conducted extensive coronavirus testing, especially in comparison to countries such as South Korea and Italy, which have aggressively tested people for the virus..."

(Source: - https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-in-japan-why-is-the-infection-rate-relatively-low-133648 )

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Japan starts 1st weekend under state of emergency as infection cases soar in Tokyo See in context

@Peeping_Tom

"Why don't you send a very strong letter of protestation to the Swedes?"

Because scientific experts in Sweden have already publicly criticised their own government.

"...Swedish health professionals are increasingly expressing concern that the government may be favouring the health of the economy over that of the public. Leading experts last week were fiercely critical of the Swedish public health authority in an email thread seen by state broadcaster SVT, accusing it of incompetence and lack of medical expertise..."

(Source: - https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/23/swedish-pm-warned-russian-roulette-covid-19-strategy-herd-immunity )

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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