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QuestionsGuy comments

Posted in: Wing tips of 2 JAL planes come into contact at Haneda airport See in context

How are the runway traffic controllers NOT aware of where each plane is?

Are there THAT many planes? Or are the workers just incompetent?

Ground control (ATC) issues clearance to leave a gate and taxi to a destination runway via a specific taxi route. Ramp control (not ATC) ensures aircraft and sometimes ground vehicles are avoiding each other.

The probable issue here is that the A350 wingspan is very large (65m) and a wing-walker who was supposed to be ensuring clearance lost situational awareness. In many aircraft types, the wingtips cannot be seen from the cockpit. There is usually a camera in the tail on larger jets to see immediately around the aircraft, but on aircraft with large wingspans you cannot see the wingtips on this camera either.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Posted in: Wing tips of 2 JAL planes come into contact at Haneda airport See in context

This is something like the other incidences - it should never happen.

There should be a failsafe built into failsafes to prevent this.

There are failsafes for this. Ramp controllers (not ATC) direct planes and vehicles on the ground as necessary, and ground staff serve as wing-walkers to ensure wingtips are clear of obstacles when entering/leaving a parking stand.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

Too many managers and business owners cannot see the value in people simply because of their race. That is what diversity laws seek to undermine.

More inclusive hiring simply widens the candidate pool. In the 1950s, there were many qualified black and women pilots from WWII, but the airlines didn't think hiring them 'fit their image'. Ironically, many of the high profile pilot error accidents in that era were caused by overconfident guys who 'fit the image' but had no idea how to work within a crew. There's a great book about this by a former Pan Am pilot called 'Skygods'.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

And yet, a lot of them recently seem to be skipped over.

LMAO that piece doesn’t say what you think it does

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

Co-pilot

That’s not an aviation job title.

In any case the claim that DEI is lowering standards is demonstrably false. Standards for licensure have increased since 2010, not the other way around. Hiring practices are another thing, but the standards are regulatory.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

But knowledge is passed onto people, that has been the case for thousands of year

Where does he work? Does he do in-house MRO or contract? And what kind of pilot? Most mechanics are only PPL if they are pilots too.

When it comes to overall experience and working with people, yes, it does.

No it does not. As I explained repeatedly in the thread, aviation requires specific skillsets that are highly regulated. It's not the same as other industries by a longshot.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

I do, and I vehemently disagree with what you said earlier.

Sorry, you don't seem to at all, as you are confusing federal regulation of certificated persons with mandates for the federal workforce itself. That's quite a leap.

No,

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/06/25/executive-order-on-diversity-equity-inclusion-and-accessibility-in-the-federal-workforce/

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/colleges-subverting-dei-ban-to-face-penalties-lawmaker-warns/vi-BB1kIonE

And this is a huge problem that will engulf and ultimately destroy the airline industry in the U.S. if they continue on this woke trajectory.

The EO literally says 'in the federal workforce', not private companies like airlines. Airlines cannot lower the standards for licensure anyway, as stated.

You have posted literally nothing about airlines being able to change the quals, because they can't. As I said, they can only add quals like type of previous flying, type ratings, and so on. And of course their HR can examine individuals for psychological condition or cultural fit in the company. The medical standards are also federally regulated and cannot be lowered by employers.

Contrary to what you're saying, Congress INCREASED the standards for ATP licensure in 2010, from 250 to 1500 flying hours to qualify.

https://www.alpa.org/news-and-events/air-line-pilot-magazine/how-congress-has-transformed

You seem to be obsessed with DEI-whatever talk online, instead of actually being aware of the regulations and current situation.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

https://hbr.org/2016/07/why-diversity-programs-fail

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michelleking/2023/01/18/three-reasons-why-diversity-equity-and-inclusion-efforts-fail/?sh=7e01b84b6a0a

United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby went viral this week after remarks he made in 2021 about the company’s diversity initiatives resurfaced. During an interview with Axios on HBO, Kirby said the company was committed to ensuring 50% of their graduating pilot classes would be women or people of color. 

Bailey doesn’t believe such quotas are a "good idea," and feels pilots should be selected based on merit alone. 

"It's basically all a matter of flight time, your credentials, your background, how much flight experience you have, and also your training," Bailey said, adding that Kirby’s comments were likely simply an effort to drum up some positive attention from the media. 

These links and quotes have zero to do with what I said. And you obviously don't have industry knowledge. As I said, the qualifications are the same for everyone and companies cannot change them, as they are mandated by regulation. To get an Airframe & Powerplant FAA license, one must pass written, oral, and practical tests by FAA examiners in more than 45 technical subjects. That applies to everyone, regardless of background.

For Air Transport Pilot ratings, the same is true, airlines have no control over the qualifications as ATP licensure is also federally mandated and controlled. You cannot take the exams and practical tests on a private basis. All airline HR can do is add additional quals like type of airline previously employed at or whether or not pilots possess training certificates (type ratings) on specific aircraft. Requiring applicants to already hold type ratings reduces the airline's initial training costs and narrows candidate pools.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Posted in: Maintenance staff shortage could clip aviation industry's wings See in context

If they’re better qualified, why not? Why should I hire a minority if they’re not qualified over someone that may be white that is qualified? That just makes no sense. Take the color equation out of the argument and look at what the person can contribute to. If you’re skilled in aeronautics why would I not hire the best given the huge safety factor involved.

This statement makes no sense. DEI does not and cannot change the qualifications because companies cannot control them. Licensure for aviation maintenance is federally regulated and is the same for everyone, regardless of background. You either pass the exams and inspections, or you don't.

The safety issue in maintenance has always been the same, past and present: management and how seriously they take the operation. If their priority is aircraft in good working order, they will have processes in place to make sure work cards are properly handled, equipment is properly used, OEM procedures are followed, etc. If their priority is squeezing more bucks for the bean counters, they will use improper equipment, assign more work than staff can handle, improperly check staff work, rush repair projects through, etc. That's the issue, and always has been - how is the operation run? Not DEI or anything else.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Posted in: U.S., Japanese forces to resume Osprey flights in Japan following fatal crash See in context

Fearful comments here are really unwarranted due to media lack of context. As an aerospace insider, can tell you Osprey accident rate is only midrange compared to other military aircraft and on par with other aircraft such as F/A-18 and AV-8B, particularly in USMC operation.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Posted in: Deadly California storm triggers flooding, mudslides, power outages See in context

The infrastructure is not low quality but the land topography is a major factor too. America is usually vast open land therefore the wind is also a factor on destruction. However, Japan with frequent natural disasters has subsequently innovated resilient infrastructure against the same. That's the difference.

The LA basin is wide and largely flat. If blackouts were only in the Santa Monica and San Gabriel mountains that would be one thing, but they're not. The utility infrastructure is old and fragile and maintained by operators who cut costs wherever they can.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Ukraine-born Miss Japan relinquishes crown after reported affair See in context

Bet the dude keeps his job and title, as usual...date married man BAD. Married man plays around, meh

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Posted in: Cascading light and 'wobbling' orbs at new Tokyo art museum See in context

Only 2.2 admissions huh? lol...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Posted in: Deadly California storm triggers flooding, mudslides, power outages See in context

US infrastructure is so low quality. It's incredible that heavy rain knocks out power to wide areas. Typhoons hit some part of Japan every summer/autumn and widespread blackouts are incredibly rare.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Posted in: Passengers' cooperation in deadly JAL crash made for 'miracle' escape See in context

pets

Sorry but pets are literally the only thing adding weight to an aircraft that don't pay to be there. Pets are allowed on a limited basis as a courtesy to passengers. Aircraft design and safety procedures cannot be prioritized around pets, it is simply not practical. How long should cabin attendants chase after a scared cat that will hide who knows where after an accident?

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Posted in: Passengers' cooperation in deadly JAL crash made for 'miracle' escape See in context

Smoke and heat filling the aircraft. Fire visible from the windows. Flight attendants "discussing" which emergency doors to open. For 18 minutes?

That's not a remotely accurate timeline. From the video evidence, fire units were on scene within 4 minutes, foam had been liberally applied to the ground fuel fire under the left wing and engine by 5:30, and the evacuation call was given 6:20 after the aircraft came to a stop. Basically most everyone was off by 7:00 and the next 10 minutes involved the crew double-checking for left behinds and coordinating with fire crews.

Yes, flight attendants were shouting to one another about exit door status in those first minutes, but this was unavoidable because the interphone system was disabled by either the nose gear collapse or damage sustained by impact with the Dash-8. The flight crew also had no instrument displays and had to visually verify the fire outside.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Posted in: Japan issues improved emergency measures following fatal plane collision at Haneda airport See in context

I have looked at videos of night landings on that same runway in big jets and yes the approach and threshold lighting is bright enough that maybe the lights of the JCG aircraft were not noticed but that argument probably won't pass muster with a mishap investigation board. 

According to pilots who use HUD at night regularly, new LED lights are really a bad mismatch with EVS on HUD systems. HUD is SOP for landing on A350, which may have reduced their visibility, at least for the PF.

 If some aircraft taxis onto the runway in front of yours, you double darn well better firewall the throttles, call tower and execute the published missed approach procedure.

Agree but in this case when the JCG aircraft entered the runway (some 40 seconds before the landing) they would have been too far to see it, especially approaching 34R. If you have landed 34R at night, you would know there's deep contrast between the blackness of the bay and HND lights, and especially from 500 or so AGL all the city lights completely fill the horizon and are at different intensity from the airport lighting, which makes the contrast even worse when focused on the runway.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Boeing CEO admits error, says mid-air blowout 'can never happen again' See in context

Now they make flying death traps. Makes the Osprey look like the benchmark for safety. Anyone who flies on one of their shonky products needs their head read.

MAX yes, other products no. The 777 has been in service since 1995 and there have been only 2 passenger fatalities in that whole time. The 757 also has an incredible safety record, and has been in service over 40 years.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Posted in: Japan issues improved emergency measures following fatal plane collision at Haneda airport See in context

There should be no confusion with use of 'No.1' and such for sequencing. The point is you don't take a runway unless the runway name is attached to the instruction. The JCG DHC8 was never instructed to enter 34R. The last instruction was to hold at Charlie 5, which they acknowledged. Entering a runway is only 'clear for takeoff 34R', 'line up and wait 34R', or 'cross 34R'....nothing else according to ICAO standard phrasing. This is a communication on the part of that crew and a recognition problem on the part of ATC for failing to notice and correct a runway incursion.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Posted in: United finds loose bolts on several 737 MAX planes, raising pressure on Boeing See in context

AAR may be lying. They performed wifi installation on the aircraft for Alaska in early December, and the pressurization warnings started the day after the aircraft returned. People in the know say the wifi antenna was installed in the same area of the cabin as the incident door, and the work would involve removing paneling for wiring installation and other activities. They claimed they didn't work on the door...that doesn't mean technicians didn't open it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Haneda airport begins clearing plane wreckage from runway See in context

Everyone should be very confident to buy tickets on A350 after watching that dismantling today. Two tractors had a hell of a time trying to pick that carbon fiber wing apart - it DID not want to come apart easily. Usually when you watch same in aluminum aircraft dismantling, it is like peeling a soda can.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Posted in: JAL pilots say they did not see coast guard plane when touching down See in context

The article I read made it sound like there was an electronic "beacon" that is activated when a craft enters the runway which would alert other crafts of possible collision.

You may be referring to TCAS, which is a transponder-based collision avoidance system. It provides warnings and evasion alerts ahead of possible collision, but only in the air.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: JAL pilots say they did not see coast guard plane when touching down See in context

The report I saw said the transponder was not yet engaged, as they thought they had not yet entered the runway, which is when it would have been engaged. Is that not the correct procedure?

Transponder would be active from the time the flight plan has been confirmed with ATC, usually when leaving the gate.

As a former pilot it is really hard to believe they would not know they had entered a runway, especially one as big as 34R at Haneda.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Japan crash marks test of how new carbon jets cope in a disaster See in context

It seems that the at the least the light craft did not have a certain kind of transponder system an ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast) to possibly aid it's TCAS (Traffic Collision Avoidance System)

TCAS is useless on the ground. The alerts and other features of it are disabled below 600 feet. There is ground collision avoidance radar in service at some 30+ large US airports, but it is not installed at HND.

And also he said that the holding position is designated by a "stop line" which consists of a line of red lights imbedded in the tarmac across the entry way. According to some reports this "line" had been having problems over the past days and was not activated - ie not lit up. If so the JCG pilot may have easily over-run the stop zone and found himself on the runway, wondering then what to do.

Stop lines are painted and have either red or flashing white wig-wag lights that caution entering the runway is next. But anyone familiar with HND would know they have entered 34R, especially on a clear night. Taxiway edge lights are blue, runway edge lights are white, so that's clue 1. Clue 2 is that directly behind the runway is the blackness of the bay.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: Japan crash marks test of how new carbon jets cope in a disaster See in context

The bad: even in the safest conditions for a crash; the airfield with fire crews at the ready, the entire craft disintegrated.

This is not necessarily bad, especially if the CFRP structure protects the cabin for over 15 minutes before fire spreads further.

Also if airborne, and a cargo fire or something similar broke out, would you rather be on a composite aircraft that gives you 20 minutes to get to the nearest landing site, or an aluminum one where you have basically minutes?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Posted in: JAL pilots say they did not see coast guard plane when touching down See in context

It has been reported the CG plane did not have a transponder.

They most definitely had a transponder, they just may not have had one with ADS-B capability.

Well. here's what pilots see by night landing at Haneda airport...the rest is up to you.

A350 pilots use a HUD (Heads Up Display) and some pilots have commented that can make seeing things on the runway at night even more difficult than it already is. Here's what that looks like, though not at HND:

https://youtu.be/GqLT8HtRAQw?si=31oMMeCUip-UMbwu&t=470

Also it should be noted the video upthread is of landing on 34L not 34R. The light field is different.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Posted in: Investigators probe conflicting reports on Tokyo airport crash See in context

I think QuestionsGuy simply means "I heard the JCG flight was TOLD to hold short of 34R".

Correct.

Let’s wait for that ”Investigation”.

MLIT released the ATC transcript this evening and it was very clear. JCG was instructed to go to the hold point on C5, and read back that instruction. JL516 was cleared to land on 34R and also read back that instruction. There was no comment from the tower even after JCG violated their instruction and got onto 34R anyway.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Posted in: Investigators probe conflicting reports on Tokyo airport crash See in context

The JCG DHC8 isn't as big as an AB 350. But it's no Cessna. Not exactly easy to miss.

I assure you it is easy to miss in position on a runway when you are approaching from behind with a nose up angle of 5-6 degrees on a 3 degree glidepath. Also keep in mind the pilots are likely using a HUD, with pale green lighting against the backdrop of an array of airfield and city lights, contrasted with the black bay. The DHC8 does not have powerful night lighting like a large airliner. It has a very narrow profile, the T-tail potentially blocks the anti-collision light on top of the fuselage from view depending on the angle, essentially invisible until you're too close to take meaningful evasive action.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Posted in: Runway safety concerns in focus as Japan probes Tokyo crash See in context

I have aviation background and this is the kind of scenario that keeps anyone involved up at night. The pace and intensity of operations exceeded capability of two-way radio communication long ago, but alas, it is still in use largely in the same way it was 40 years ago. There are some simple fixes for runway occupancy that can be implemented with relative ease worldwide, and perhaps this accident will spur that on. RIP to the CG folks who were just doing their duty...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Posted in: Investigators probe conflicting reports on Tokyo airport crash See in context

The only conflict here is the JCG stating their pilot said he had clearance. MLIT had to correct the record subsequently. Maybe the JCG crew thought they had clearance, but the recordings will show definitively what was said. The only thing clear on the audio tape I heard is the JCG flight was cleared to hold short of 34R, and JL516 was cleared to land on 34R. Another mystery to be answered though is the JCG aircraft entered the runway and apparently held there for several moments without a peep from the tower. So one wonders how the tower failed to notice an aircraft had not complied with their instructions while JL516 was about to land. The DHC8 is a small dimly-lit aircraft, if they were in position on the runway, it is very unlikely JL516 even saw them until it was too late.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

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