Raw Beer comments

Posted in: Countries with lower-than-expected vaccination rates show unusually negative attitudes to vaccines See in context

The article focuses on mentions, emotions, and misinformation on social media, as if those who have a negative opinion of the current vaccines are wrong. They're not wrong; there are plenty of valid reasons to have a negative opinion of these vaccines. Social media also has top medical experts discussing real data on the lack of vaccine effectiveness and their side effects.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

Posted in: Cases of COVID returning pose questions for Pfizer pill See in context

Indeed, it is very common for drugs that go through the normal testing process (non emergency) to get FDA approval and then later taken off the market after serious side effects are discovered. 

So what serious side effects have been discovered for this? just arguing that something "may" be found in the future is not an argument to demonstrate the testing done for something was not adequate, for that you need objective parameters that have not been fulfilled, "not enough time" is just a personal bias that have no real value.

If one has a choice between a rushed investigational drug that has only been approved for emergency use and a drug that has been given safely to billions of people over decades...

IVM and HCQ have a well-established safety profile after billions of doses administered. 

And also a well stablished lack of effectiveness against covid according to many well conducted studies,

What you call "well conducted studies" are those that involve conflicts of interest and were designed to fail (e.g. massive doses given too late).

IVM and HCQ have been demonstrated to be effective when used properly.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

Posted in: Cases of COVID returning pose questions for Pfizer pill See in context

Paxlovid may be useful and effective, but has been developed quickly.

Indeed, it is very common for drugs that go through the normal testing process (non emergency) to get FDA approval and then later taken off the market after serious side effects are discovered. I wouldn't be surprised if the same happens with Paxlovid, considering its chemical structure. In contrast, IVM and HCQ have a well-established safety profile after billions of doses administered. IVM is extremely safe. HCQ is also very safe as long as you don't greatly exceed the recommend dose (as they did in those trials that were designed to fail).

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Posted in: Will new vaccines be better at fighting coronavirus variants? See in context

For something that is approved then the requirement is that is at least as safe and effective as the current option, and that it offers some kind of advantage.

Yeah, that is why they block several potential options, to make sure the more profitable ones appear attractive when compared to the permitted options.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Posted in: Gov't says masks not needed outdoors if distancing maintained See in context

The government finally openly admitted the obvious, bit late though....

8 ( +13 / -5 )

Posted in: Sometimes we overdo it, such as wearing masks all day because we are afraid of what other people think. I think we should review our mask-wearing measures for times when masks are unnecessary. See in context

I agree most Japanese wear masks mainly because of social pressure; they don't want to be the only one out there without a mask.

I am always maskless outdoors. I hope it will make others feel more free to do the same.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Posted in: Will new vaccines be better at fighting coronavirus variants? See in context

mRNA didn't work this time so would it next time? This just reads like an advert

Preventing uncountable deaths thanks to these vaccines means they did work and keep working until now,

No, the Danish study clearly showed that the mRNA "vaccines" did not decrease overall mortality. Adenovirus-based vaccines had some effect.

Hopefully the next vaccines will be more effective and safer, but I doubt they will ever be as effective as a natural infection.

Definitely, the thing that must be greatly improved is the way the vaccines are tested. Until they setup a system of honest, open, and intelligently design clinical trials I will never trust anything they produce.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Posted in: Much-maligned rats unlikely to spark next pandemic: study See in context

Rats unlikely to spark next pandemic, unless someone decides to do gain of function experiments.

Yes!

Exactly zero pandemics have been related to human experimentation of any sort,

Exactly zero pandemics have been admitted to ...

pretending this is even likely (never mind more likely than the natural mechanism that originated every pandemic in history) only betrays a deep antiscientific basis.

Well then I guess Fauci has surrounded himself by "antiscientific" experts because their released Emails clearly show they thought the lab leak to be much more likely.

It's thought that HIV came into the Human world through the eating of our close relatives the Chimpanzees.

Some have suggested it might have risen from vaccines made from a contaminated simian cell line.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Posted in: U.S. drug regulator limits use of J&J COVID vaccine See in context

60 cases recorded, which is just a fraction of actual cases. Real number is likely at least 10X higher.

Yeah, an older Harvard investigation showed that only 1% of vaccine adverse effects are reported to VAERS. A number of more recent studies focusing on Covid19 vaccines showed that the real number of adverse effects is at least 10X the VAERS numbers.

In any case, an unpopular vaccine, as most have flocked to the far more efficient Pfizer and Moderna miracle shots.

Actually, those are probably worse. According to the recent Danish study I've been bringing up lately, mRNA vaccines had no effect on overall mortality, while the adenovirus based vaccines showed some benefit... But I would avoid all of them...

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Posted in: COVID treatments: Still struggling for mass uptake See in context

That is putting it very kindly. Molnupiravir was shown by Merck to be less effective than placebo against Delta, and it is extremely toxic (and expensive).

Which is why it is losing completely market against much more effective drugs like Paxlovid, that is still very effective against serious complications and death from variants.

And yet governments world wide agreed to purchase millions of doses after Merck's data showed it to be ineffective and toxic. If more was needed to prove that governments and regulatory agencies are captured... Same goes with Remdesivir.

we should seriously consider how much money has to be spent to prevent 1 person developing severe symptoms. 

How much money do you consider too much to save one life?

Money should be spent much more wisely. Why aren't they? Who is profiting from this? Not the general public....

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Posted in: COVID treatments: Still struggling for mass uptake See in context

The recommendation was based on new trials showing Paxlovid reduced the risk of hospital admission by 85 percent...

They studied high risk symptomatic people that were unvaccinated. 1% of the Paxlovid side developed severe symptoms, while 7% of the placebo did. Considering this was done during Delta and that each treatment costs over $500 and that today most high risk people are vaccinated and omicron is much less likely to result in severe symptoms, we should seriously consider how much money has to be spent to prevent 1 person developing severe symptoms. It would be much more rational to provide cheap and effective repurposed drugs (yes, they are effective!) that have well established safety profiles.

while molnupiravir has proved significantly less effective.

That is putting it very kindly. Molnupiravir was shown by Merck to be less effective than placebo against Delta, and it is extremely toxic (and expensive).

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Posted in: The quest for a universal coronavirus vaccine See in context

Natural infection does not offer 100% protection, but it is well established that it is far better and longer lasting than the protection offered by the "vaccination".

Those who have already recovered from an infection get very little, if any, additional protection by getting the "vaccine", it is definitely not worth the risk of suffering from vaccine adverse effects or the negative effects the vaccines have on T-cell immunity.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Posted in: COVID shots still work but researchers seek new improvements See in context

Vaccines do prevent infections and even transmission

No they don't. Even Pfizer's CEO said multiple times that they have very little effect on infection and transmission.

Natural infection produces significant and long-lasting production IgA antibodies and memory lymphocytes at the site of entry. The vaccine do not do that, that is why they only offer a few weeks to months of reduction of symptoms.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Posted in: The quest for a universal coronavirus vaccine See in context

With many (most) people having already recovered from a natural infection, they already have far superior protection than what can be provided by any of the "vaccines", so what is the point other than to further enrich a select few.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Posted in: Ukraine cracks down on 'traitors' helping Russian troops See in context

Ukraine cracks down on freedom of speech.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Posted in: Japan to limit 4th COVID vaccine to elderly, those with underlying conditions See in context

Why do you think every institution of medicine and science in the world recommends vaccination of the general population?

The capture of medical institutes and regulatory agencies by pharma is well documented, and yet a number of them do not make that recommendation.

Also, the Danish health authority decided to suspend their Covid vaccination. I suspect at least partly due to that country's study showing that the mRNA "vaccines" had no effect on overall mortality.

I hope this latest announcement from the Japanese health ministry panel is an indication that it is starting to break free from this capture.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Posted in: COVID shots still work but researchers seek new improvements See in context

People should not think that the vaccine protects you from dying.

Yes, many have been saying this for a long time. And now a recent Danish study shows that these mRNA vaccines offer no protection against death (overall mortality).

Rather than getting an ineffective and potentially lethal 'vaccine', I'm just going to take zinc because it's been demonstrated to be one of the most useful for fighting viruses

@ Wobot

I do that too (with quercetin) and I too try to spend time in the sun on a regular basis. But you might also want to look at copper. I recently came across info on the importance of the zinc to copper ratio, and that taking large quantities of zinc can mess up that balance...

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Posted in: Tokyo reports 5,394 new coronavirus cases; nationwide tally 41,756 See in context

The number of infected people hospitalized with severe symptoms in Tokyo is 13.

This thing is over. No reason to worry about "cases"....

-4 ( +11 / -15 )

Posted in: Musk won't have a board to watch him when he takes Twitter private: Does that matter? See in context

Musk won't have a board to watch him when he takes Twitter private: Does that matter?

That's a good thing.

One of the reasons for the lack of free speech is the presence of board members who are also on the board of the companies being promoted/defended by twitter (or FB.....).

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Posted in: WHO 'strongly recommends' Pfizer's COVID pill See in context

A strong immune system seems to be the best against COVID or any viral infections. Natural immunity.

Yes! Nothing beats natural immunity. If your immune system functions properly, it will have no problems handling this virus. People really should be focusing on optimizing their immune system.

On the contrary, the evidence that the article talks about clearly demonstrate that people under Paxlovid treatment do better than if just leave things to their immune systems.

Yes, for people that do not have a properly functioning immune system...

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Posted in: WHO 'strongly recommends' Pfizer's COVID pill See in context

No thanks!

I'll stick with those repurposed drugs that are equally effective, but have well established safety profiles and extremely low prices.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Posted in: Twitter bans ads that deny climate change See in context

"Misleading advertisements on Twitter that contradict the scientific consensus on climate change are prohibited, in line with our inappropriate content policy,"

When considering the "the scientific consensus on climate change", it's important to remember Climategate, which documented data manipulation and journals controlling the narrative by refusing papers that disagreed with the so-called "consensus" and their expelling editors that accepted such papers. This is another example of captured institutions/agencies/media...

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Posted in: U.S. announces global COVID summit for May 12 See in context

This one has special importance because representatives of governments, with the power of making decisions that affect how the pandemic is going to be dealt in the future, will attend.

So they will basically meet to better coordinate their actions and narratives in order to better exploit this "crisis" and gain more control over their populations.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Posted in: Leader of QAnon's Japan branch arrested for obstructing COVID vaccinations for kids See in context

I agree it should be up to the parents to vaccinate or not, but there this thing called informed consent, which is just not happening; it's uninformed consent. So I applaud this group for trying to raise awareness, though I'm not sure this is the best approach. At least this way they are getting news coverage. I had never heard of YamatoQ until I read about them on JT. Thanks JT!

The mayor has a responsibility to determine what's best for his constituents and do everything in his power to achieve it.

Oh! You would let your mayor decide what is good for your health?!!!

Vaccines are no different to any other medication in that they are well researched and tested before release, continually monitored and improved.

Well, many meds that were not rushed to market by Warp-Speed, were years later found to be toxic and taken off the market. Also, many pharma companies, but especially Pfizer, have been convicted multiple times and fined billions for falsifying data and bribing. These vaccines are being monitored, but the data hidden. Court orders were needed for the release of some of the data, which showed considerable adverse effects and deaths, yet crickets... All we keep on hearing is "say and effective"

0 ( +13 / -13 )

Posted in: Japan considers 4th vaccine shots for elderly, chronically ill patients See in context

It is rather hard to understand why there is such a monomania around these things when zinc and vitamin D could also be distributed. "If it saves one life..."

Zinc and vitamin D do not guarantee a person will not have serious complications or even die,

Same as the "vaccines".

and on those that already have adequate levels it doesn't even have an effect.

Yeah, just like the vaccines have no effect for those who are already immune. Also, a considerable fraction of the population do not have adequate levels of zinc and vitamin D.

The important difference between the two however is that increasing one's zinc and vitamin D levels in not only extremely cheap and safe, it has additional health benefits. In sharp contrast, the "vaccines" are expensive and their serious side effects (including death) are off the charts.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Posted in: U.S. announces global COVID summit for May 12 See in context

I wonder who will be allowed to participate at this global summit.

There have been a few Covid summits already in various countries. They were very informative, yet we never hear about them...

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Posted in: Tokyo reports 5,583 new coronavirus cases; nationwide tally 40,893 See in context

How many people have had their livelihoods destroyed by blocking tourism?

More than people who have had their lives ended by Covid?

More than people who have had their lives spared by blocking tourism.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Posted in: Japan expert panel OKs use of Novavax COVID-19 vaccine See in context

I am still COVID vax free.

That's another corporate concoction you can add to the list of concoctions that still haven't entered my bloodstream and never will.

Same here, cheers!

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Posted in: What is the difference, as you understand it, of dying "from Covid” and dying "with Covid?" See in context

How about all those whose cause of death is the treatment. They'll certainly be counted as dying "from Covid”, though that is not the cause.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Posted in: What is the difference, as you understand it, of dying "from Covid” and dying "with Covid?" See in context

As I understand it, dying "from Covid” is when the virus is the cause of death, while dying "with Covid" is when someone dies from something else and they happen to get a PCR positive test. In practice however, it all depends on the honesty of the people making the determination.

I would also add that even in those who die "from Covid", the problems generally arise long after the virus has stopped replicating, with the body reacting improperly (cytokine storm, clotting...).

1 ( +4 / -3 )

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