Simon Foston comments

Posted in: Too old to run? Biden wrestles with age as he eyes 2020 run See in context

Burning BushToday  07:18 am JST

Democrats can't wield a winnable candidate.

Even Hillary Clinton got more votes than him in 2016 and she wasn't all that inspiring really.

Can any Democrats evoke the same passion in Americans that Trump does?

What, fanatical stupidity in a large, bigoted, narrow-minded minority of the population and loathing and contempt in everyone else? It's funny how Trump supporters like to peddle the fantasy that he's swept up the whole population in a wave of cult-like adoration when all he's actually got is an unconvincing Electoral College victory, a few rallies in deep red states filled with whooping rednecks and lots of ranting online trolls.

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Posted in: Cohen claims Trump knew hush money payments wrong See in context

bass4funkToday 12:38 pm JST

You and I don’t know that and besides, you can’t prove it. It’s his word against the Presidents.

And we should all take the word of Your Beloved President because he's always so scrupulously honest about absolutely everything and a peerless bastion of moral fibre, isn't he.

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Posted in: 9 more med schools involved in misconduct after another admits exam rigging See in context

JoeintokyoToday  09:26 am JST

The idea of studying for four years, passing final exams and then having to do more exams just sounds dumb.

Sorry, I can't agree. The idea of having a standard, rigorous exam independent of any university, that measures medical competency seems to me a good thing.

Or universities could be obliged to meet particular national standards when devising exams, so that all degrees awarded have the same value and guarantee that all graduates have the same amount of knowledge and proficiency. Then again I suppose a lot of jobs depend on that otherwise pointless layer of bureaucracy.

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Posted in: 9 more med schools involved in misconduct after another admits exam rigging See in context

JoeintokyoToday 09:01 am JST

To become doctors, they have to pass difficult national exams after graduating medical schools and the national exams are not rigged.

True, but there still seems to be a lot of iffy doctors in Japan. Possible this difficult national exam needs to be made more difficult.

Or they could just do away with national exams and make a medical degree the only academic prerequisite for getting the job. The idea of studying for four years, passing final exams and then having to do more exams just sounds dumb.

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Posted in: 9 more med schools involved in misconduct after another admits exam rigging See in context

SchopenhauerToday 08:28 am JST

Simon Foston

Private colleges in Japan are generally receivers of students who failed entrance exams of national colleges.

SaikoPhysco

To become doctors, they have to pass difficult national exams after graduating medical schools and the national exams are not rigged.

That doesn't really answer my question at all, but if we join the dots it appears that private colleges will admit students with insufficient academic skills, take their money, and then when they graduate they are unlikely to be able to pass the difficult national exams. Sounds like a major rip-off to me.

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Posted in: 9 more med schools involved in misconduct after another admits exam rigging See in context

SchopenhauerToday 08:09 am JST

Why should not private colleges accept students who earnestly want to enter the colleges?

Failing to meet the required academic standard is the usual reason.

They are fans of the schools and...

So what you're basically saying is that exam rigging is okay?

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Posted in: Republicans beginning to worry about Trump re-election See in context

SerranoToday 07:52 pm JST

I'll be among the voters giving Trump and Pence a landslide victory in 2020.

That notion is just as fantastical as the idea of Trump being impeached by this time next year. I can see him possibly eking out another dubious Electoral College victory if the Democrats really can't produce a better candidate than Hillary Clinton, but a landslide victory... ? It's little wonder no one takes you seriously.

lincolnmanToday 08:54 pm JST

**bass4funkToday 06:56 pm JST **Because it’s the sites that only liberals will believe in since they don’t believe in ANY conservative site.

You visit this site, because its the only site liberals will believe - equals you are a liberal.. Welcome brother - I would have never thunk it

That's what he meant? I couldn't make any sense of it whatsoever.

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Posted in: Top Democrats say Trump may face impeachment, jail over hush money See in context

Alex EinzToday  10:45 pm JST

haha, nothing will happen and rightfully so, at least he wasnt one sexually harassing his interns like some democrats

What a great line of defence. Someone should have told Nixon to try that one, he clearly need never have resigned.

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Posted in: Top Democrats say Trump may face impeachment, jail over hush money See in context

SerranoToday  10:58 pm JST

Nah, the Trump haters are blinded with their hate for the man. I'm afraid some of them will go completely insane when he's re-elected in a landslide.

This... speculation about a landslide victory is based on what evidence, precisely? It sounds more like a joke from a Star Trek Mirror Universe episode. Anyway, anyone who actually expects that to happen is clearly blinded by something else.

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Posted in: Top Democrats say Trump may face impeachment, jail over hush money See in context

jcapanToday 10:26 am JST

Is it so hard to accept that people who think like you are in a MINORITY and that you do NOT speak for most Americans?

I'm a liberal who's been voting team D across the board since 1988, and I can admit Trump is the rightfully elected POTUS, however depressing that sentence seems. Most of us don't like the electoral college but we accept the results regardless, at least until we can change how things work. Did he win the popular vote, no, but let's stop pretending he's illegitimate or that the Russians tilted the balance his way.

I'm not disputing the fact that Trump won by the rules and I certainly wouldn't describe him as an illegitimate president. Changing how things work definitely sounds like a good idea, though.

My party lost to a complete and utter moron. We need to take ownership of that and move forward, coming up with a compelling alternative vision for how to repair the damage his administration is actively doing, and hopefully put him out with the garbage come January 2021. Dwelling on elections settled more than 2 years ago or quibbling about this/that vote does none of that.

All very true, but no one should say "the people" elected Donald Trump.

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Posted in: Trump calls for end to Mueller probe despite Russian campaign bid findings See in context

WASHINGTON

U.S. President Donald Trump on Saturday renewed his call to end a federal probe into Russian election meddling, describing the investigation as a "witch hunt" a day after U.S. prosecutors detailed a previously unknown attempt by a Russian to help his 2016 presidential election campaign.

If I ever get arrested I think I'll try applying Trump logic and tell them to drop the case because I think it's really unfair. Obviously they'll just have to let me go.

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Posted in: Top Democrats say Trump may face impeachment, jail over hush money See in context

YubaruToday 06:41 am JST

Impeachment by the house is one thing, actually having it go to a trial in the Republican controlled senate is another thing.

The idea of anything really important being decided in a chamber with two Senators from each State regardless of population sizes is inherently absurd.

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Posted in: Top Democrats say Trump may face impeachment, jail over hush money See in context

Gremlin.GaijinToday 09:48 am JST

What happens when the people elect him again in 2020?

The PEOPLE didn't elect the Orange Idiot in 2016, Hilary Clinton easily won the PEOPLE'S VOTE.

Trump cultists can't get their heads around that concept. Well, in a proper, representative democracy they would be the losers, and who cares what losers think.

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Posted in: Top Democrats say Trump may face impeachment, jail over hush money See in context

BlacklabelToday 08:19 am JST

A few months, soon, mueller is coming. Same stuff we been hearing for 2 years.

What happens when the people elect him again in 2020?

Why do your sort keep saying "the people" elected Donald Trump when he lost the popular vote and won because of an archaic, broken, unrepresentative electoral college system? Is it so hard to accept that people who think like you are in a MINORITY and that you do NOT speak for most Americans?

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Posted in: Trump calls Tillerson 'dumb as a rock' and 'lazy' See in context

SerranoToday 11:49 am JST

Confirmed yet again. Best POTUS ever. Pompeo is way better than Rex.

So what is the going rate on self-respect these days?

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Posted in: Trump calls Tillerson 'dumb as a rock' and 'lazy' See in context

Chip StarToday  07:34 am JST

Trump has zero capacity to judge anyone as dumb as a rock.

There seems to be some consensus there.

“His chief promises were that he would build the wall, defund planned parenthood and repeal Obamacare, and he hasn’t done any of those things. I’ve come to believe that Trump’s role is not as a conventional president who promises to get certain things achieved to the Congress and then does. I don’t think he’s capable. I don’t think he’s capable of sustained focus. I don’t think he understands the system. I don’t think the Congress is on his side. I don’t think his own agencies support him.”

To quote Tucker Carlson.

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Posted in: Ghosn arrest puts Japan's justice system in the dock See in context

Shin Kukimoto, deputy chief prosecutor at Tokyo District Public Prosecutors Office, lashed out at foreign criticism of their work in a recent news conference.

"Each and every country has its unique history and tradition and systems. I do not criticise other countries' systems just because they are different."

Classic disingenuous weaselling and strawman arguments. No one has criticised Japan's system just because it's different either.

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Posted in: Japan considers inviting Trump after new emperor's accession in May See in context

BlacklabelDec. 4  08:56 pm JST

Looking forward to meeting the President of the United States here in June 2019.

Maybe he'll let you kiss his ring and call him "godfather." Or run along behind him carrying his toilet paper.

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Posted in: Japan considers inviting Trump after new emperor's accession in May See in context

Abe's such a loathsome sycophant I'm surprised he didn't ask Trump if he wanted the job himself.

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Posted in: Ex-Nissan chief Ghosn to be served with fresh arrest warrant See in context

seadog538Today  06:30 am JST

In many countries people charged with committing crimes or offences are imprisoned pending trial. 

In some of those countries such detention is only permissible if the police have charged the suspect after gathering sufficient evidence for prosecutors to have a chance of securing a conviction from judges who aren't in collusion with them. In Japan mere suspicion of a crime appears to be all the police and prosecutors need to get someone detained for as long as they feel like.

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Posted in: Ex-Nissan chief Ghosn to be served with fresh arrest warrant See in context

JohnToday  12:47 pm JST

Many people above are viewing and criticizing Japanese justice system through western standards : that's utterly wrong to do so.

No it's not. Western standards of criminal justice are quite a lot higher. Police and prosecutors can do more or less as they please here and judges just rubber stamp it. Or don't you find a 99% conviction rate just a bit suspicious?

I wouldn't criticise the Japanese system at all if I thought it punished crime or protected the innocent any better than western justice systems do, but I don't think it does at all. How the Japanese police, prosecutors and courts treat suspects is not something to draw any good lessons from.

It doesn't mean that because one country has different laws, history, culture that they are necessarily wrong when they don't fit your personal views on a specific matter.

In this case they ARE wrong. Or do you think it is justifiable in any society, Japanese or otherwise, to deny a suspect access to legal representation in police interviews or put them in tiny cells with windows they can't see out of?

JohnToday  01:51 pm JST

For example, as I lived quite some time in France, I can tell you that such a case in France, with the French justice system, CEO don't even get arrested in the first place.

Terrible. Plenty of Japanese CEOs and politicians have never seen the inside of a custody cell either. Shinzo Abe, for instance, and there's probably more dirt going around on him than on Carlos Ghosn.

And lastly, prosecutors in Japan are not obligated to go to trial asap, because that's how the Japanese justice system works, and it doesn't mean they are necessarily lacking evidence to do so.

If they have enough evidence to make a convincing case, why hang around? The only response to that seems to be:

semperfiToday  02:22 pm JST

The prosecution had the evidence all along.

I do not know why they wait for a confession - but it seems to be how it works i n Japan.

I can't defend something if I don't know why they do it, personally.

JohnToday  02:59 pm JST

So the prosecutors likely have something.

Maybe just a suspicion that he's a wrong 'un...

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Posted in: 'Zero' doubt Saudi crown prince directed Khashoggi murder: GOP senators See in context

Looks like GOP legislators actually have a few more scruples and principles than the average Trump apologist.

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

CH3CHOToday  11:01 am JST

Yes, it is odd. One is contradicting the other. Which to believe?

It's pretty obvious who you would believe. I kind of get the idea that if they beat you up in custody and then told you you'd fallen down the stairs you would take their word for it.

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

CH3CHOToday  08:59 pm JST

Read article 199 of law of criminal procedure of Japan. It says arrest must be based on an arrest warrant issued by a judge.

Going by accounts it sounds like judges will approve whatever the police put in front of them.

Also read article 200. It says that the "charged offence" must be written on the arrest warrant. Then article 201, which says that the arrest warrant must be shown to the suspect when he is arrested.

Isn't it obvious?

It's odd, then, that people seem to be able to end up in custody and yet have very little idea of what crimes they have supposedly committed.

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

ShawnToday 11:39 am JST

@Simon,

if you live in Japan long enough, your realize your like an island. Another gaijin experience may parallel yours, or maybe completely opposite, you cant really believe or trust what somebody might say because we are in the land of "case by case". I can 100% relate to michealqtodd, as Ive had similar experiences, during those times you learn to trust yourself.

I'm not disputing anything about what michealqtodd says at all. I was commenting on how CH3CHO described the arrest and detention process as one involving warrants, judges, courts and appeals, in which the police seem to have very little authority, yet going by michealqtodd's experiences and your own it sounds like the police can actually do pretty much as they please. On the whole I think I find what michealqtodd says to be much closer to the truth of what usually goes on. Not to say that these processes do not exist, but I imagine the police just do not bother with them if they do not feel like it and the judges are happy to be spared the extra work.

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

michaelqtoddToday 07:23 am JST

6 years ago I was detained in solitary confinement for 11 days then in a 5 person cell for another 43 days after that. I was never charged with anything. I was never actually even close to being charged with anything I do not think.

It doesn't sound anything like the elaborate process of police getting warrants from judges and appeals in court so carefully described by other commenters. Who, I would imagine, have never been on the receiving end of such treatment themselves.

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

CH3CHOToday  05:51 pm JST

Simon FostonToday  01:52 pm JST

In Japan, police do not have the power to arrest a suspect on their own. They have to provide enough proof of the crime to a judge for issuance of an arrest warrant, with which they can arrest the suspect. The allegation is disclosed to the arrested person. He or his lawyer can challenge the arrest warrant in court. If the appeal is successful, he is released....

...The court may decide to detain the accused until the trial begins or may release the accused on bail until the trial.

It all sounds incredibly bureaucratic and unnecessarily complicated. It also raises the question, if the police already had enough evidence to satisfy the judge that an arrest warrant should be issued what further investigation would be necessary that justified detaining the suspect for 20 days per charge?

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

CH3CHONov. 30  10:31 pm JST

Tokyo-EngrToday 07:11 am JST

Holding someone for weeks with no charges

This is or is not true depending on the meaning of "charge".

If "charge" means formal allegation, in Japan, a suspect is "charged" when he is arrested. The allegation must be filed to a judge for approval before the arrest and must be spelled out to a suspect when he is arrested. The suspect can challenge the allegation in the court of law while he is detained.

If "charge" means "kiso" which is usually translated as "indictment" but is actually the start of a trial, he is not "charged". Right, he is detained but the trial has not begun.

That's all very hard to follow. Perhaps it would make sense to outline what happens in another country, e.g. the UK, and you can tell us how it's different in Japan. British police arrest a suspect, stating at the time of arrest what crime they think has been committed. The suspect can be held in custody for 24 hours, with a solicitor (pre-trial lawyer) present during police questioning. After that if the police can't provide the Crown Prosecution Service with enough evidence to give them a chance of securing a conviction in court the suspect must be released although they can apply to the Home Secretary to hold terrorism suspects for longer. Otherwise they charge the suspect with the crime and the case proceeds to court. The suspect, now the accused, is transferred to prison for the duration of the trial unless the judge agrees to grant bail. Just a few less fascist police state overtones, I think.

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Posted in: Japanese prosecutors say they will detain Ghosn as long as needed See in context

socrateosNov. 30  10:03 pm JST

Simon Foston:

kwatt: "Prosecutors don't want to lose any evidences involved this case."

It says nothing of the sort in the article so I still think that's just speculation.

The article does not, but the law does. Pretrial confinement is allowed only if prosecutors provide and accepted by court reasons (刑事訴訟法第199-1) as well as necessities (刑事訴訟法第199-2, 143-2).

The laws describes such necessities as high possibility to escape and/or to destroy evidences.

Then it's a stupid, backwards system designed to trample on the rights of suspects and give police excuses for conducting sloppy investigations. If they can't get sufficient evidence either before they take someone into custody or very soon afterwards they aren't doing their jobs properly and the only real reason they have for lengthy detentions is to pressure suspects into making confessions. Besides, whatever Japan's archaic, prosecution-biased laws state the prosecutors in this case have not cited possible destruction of evidence as their reason for holding Carlos Ghosn or Greg Kelly. I was of the impression the investigation had been going on for some time before they were actually arrested - enough time, I would suppose, to gather all the evidence needed and secure it.

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Posted in: Trump's ex-lawyer Cohen pleads guilty to lying about Moscow tower project See in context

bass4funkToday 01:21 pm JST

"Why are you so eager to have convicted criminals set free?"

I want to ask liberals the same question.

Or put it another way, you don't have a good answer for it and can't come up with one.

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