UknownPlayer comments

Posted in: Facebook under pressure as U.S., EU urge probes of data practices See in context

Market price often leads fundamental changes. The case of Facebook falling into the cross hairs was a fresh catalyst to precipitate the bearish move in the NASDAQ composite today. This case falls within the significant theme of the enormous tech corps increasing regulatory scrutiny. With the new administration in the WH, the risk of the profoundly bull market sizzling run might be over because of the push for more close examination of regulations of tech conglomerates such as Google, Apple, Netlix, Amazon, Tesla, Uber, AirBnB, Facebook, etc.

These corporations made a killing from a favorable modus operandi of Obama which included supervisory advantages and almost non-existent, unconditional central authority funding (especially in the case of Tesla). As a result, this generated a survival of the fittest backdrop where loss-laden ventures (some with questionable business models) and foundational groups cunningly able to hoard war chests of capital while sidestepping abiding laws. Thus allowing a lot of these tech comps to function without the hindrance of liabilities (in a lot of cases including tax payers money) that weighed down its competitors.

These multinationals were deployed to disrupt industries but have done so with inequitable beneficial leverages. They almost accomplished in ruining industries. For the duration, it is becoming a foreboding peril regarding the transmission of unreservedly power into so few hands which I'm doubtful it won't go unchecked for much longer. With more microscopic regulatory checkup, it will positively overall for better prospects of recovery bounce back in other sectors of the broad-based US economy that is meant to be who were squeezed by the tech giant kings.

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Posted in: As U.S. opioid crisis grows, Trump calls for death penalty for dealers See in context

So many individuals who end up using, abusing and sometimes dying from these dangerous, harmfully potent drugs started with their well-meaning physician's legal prescriptions. Don't get me wrong, I consider doctors on case by case basis because most of them are caring, decent human beings. But on the other hand, many doctors also do not seem put a lot of thoughts into the long term harmful, negative effects that may occur on their patients.

The current upsurge isn't generally rooted in delinquency but a lot of cases are. Most of the drug issues are predominantly behavioral related matter of contention. Arguments such as scantiness of jobs, family interaction inadequacies, instant gratification cultural imbeddedness, powerlessness to endure minor inconsequential discomforts, easy marijuana accessibility during younger days, parents who also consumes, prescriptions (sometimes unnecessary) from doctors, overindulge and admittance to meds, substantial extensive boost of medicaid/disability, etc and the list goes on and on.

Most rehab programs have been very ineffective to trying to tackle the root cause of these issues. Personal responsibility and accountability, moral integrity, deep value for hard work ethics, family, faith, expansive job creation and availability, etc are good starters. Argumentatively it can be on a case by case for each unique individual because it it so complicated but generally a large contributing factor of drug abuse are characteristics of being immature, dishonest, low self-esteem, depression and probably the most terrifying of them, are the vindictive suicides that throw so many others in suffering and despair.

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Posted in: Trump picks camera-proven Kudlow as top economic aide See in context

With the above prior post I've stated in mind, the most significant economic policy around the globe is coming out of the White House. Kudlow's statements will be closely scrutinized by other players around the world because of the essential consequences attached to it in reference to the various capital markets.

It is even a bigger deal for a full time personal, private institutional macro fundamental investor and technical intrinsic value-based trader like me who trades and invest 7-8 USD figure voluminous transactions through forex futures & spot, options, bonds, stock indexes, ETFs, commodities, precious metals, cryptocurrencies and real estate.

Here are some of Kudlow's comments during the time he was announced as the official head of the White House Economic Council from my own Bloomberg Terminal platform...

https://framapic.org/EMecWf4z3ULC/XrrBELCKK646.jpg

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Posted in: Trump picks camera-proven Kudlow as top economic aide See in context

Another interesting fact that many people are not aware of was that Obama had also position changes over the 8 years with 4 different people. One of their snafu in economic oversight when the global economies were imploding was to prioritize in handling the healthcare timetable. That was when the world was at the most fragile state in recent times where global growth and stabilization was despairingly needed.

As a result, Bernanke had to do almost all the heavy workload where it should have mattered more at the White House instead of at the Federal Reserve. Bernanke had to continue providing liquidity to stabilize the global credit system and as well other issues through unprecedented monetary means via experimentation of QE. The Fed had to keep printing money out of thin air up to the point where they had to pass the QE baton off to BOJ and ECB.

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Posted in: Trump picks camera-proven Kudlow as top economic aide See in context

Honestly the White House communications have been terribly disorganized. That's a fact that cannot be disputed and fair to say the least. It is still undoubtedly questionable with Kudlow in there if it actually going to enhance anything. Kudlow's job is to regularly advocate Trump's economic program with just a bit more frequency, positive, consistent flavor is my expectations for his position. Well the more I think about it, Kudlow as solid as his economic credentials are, might be better off as a PR spokesperson.

Due to the US economy's floundering state in the past 10 years or so, Kudlow's duty is in the the spotlight of being a high profile position in reference to Trump's growth focus policies. Interesting enough to note that during Obama's time, his lead advisors were meagerly known heads compare to Goldman Sach's Cohn who's been under the current administration.

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Posted in: EU slams trade 'bullies' as Trump row deepens See in context

As Commerce secretary Ross stated many times that economic security is national security to the US. Economy connects every broad based sector that US economy is built upon. Whether it will be welfare, defense, healthcare, education, financial, etc., the economy is the heart of it all that connects everything. To secure America is to secure the State's economy. If the economy falters so does everything around it collapses also. There is a strategy behind all of this chaos where trillions are at stake here folks.

The world's trade players are fully aware 3-4+ decades of America's trade deals have ended up with enormous massive export of U.S. luxury by way of manufacturing gains as well as jobs within other

nations. The country's underpriviliged middle-class were the losers from the ineffective trade policies by the past administrations but instead all the financial rewards went to the multinational corps and banks as well as of course Wall Street.

So if you reverse engineer the multi decades of failed processes from prior trade policies that had the obvious outcome of export and redistribution of America's wealth... what will happen?

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Posted in: EU slams trade 'bullies' as Trump row deepens See in context

Cecilia Malmstroem and Jean-Claude Juncker are not the real decision makers here. More like these 2 officials are the EU's PR cheerleaders. As a trader/investor, I would only really looked at and listen to what German Chancellor Angela Merkel would do against Trump with these issues. UK and the EU slap tariffs on China's steel about less than a couple years ago or so to save their own butt. I don't buy the EU retaliation thing. EU bureaucrats are just trying to save face to look like they are actually trying to fight back against the bully Trump as the MSM is clearly trying to portray. Forget about retaliation because they won't. There trillions and trillions at stake here in regards to the powerhouse Germany's point of view. There is more to this story than meets the eye.

You see, the one of the biggest market risk at moment is the uncertainty of Brexit terms. More so than Trump's tariffs fulminations at the moment. Currently UK is still at the stage of expounding their conditions. At the same time with all the current formalizing negotiations, Germany has another important issue to address regarding the revenue shortfall. Presently, Britain with about 2.5 USD trillion economy pays roughly 1 billion on a monthly basis to Brussels. This will stop, so EU which is mainly Germany has to discover a way to make up for the billions in taxes lost revenue.

So with this problem, Brexit's 2.5 trillion decreases EU's GDP overall. Merkel's weakened political party as well as attaching her economy to the comprehensive Paris Treaty's environmental regulations (though she's trying to cut down those regs), from a economically logical standpoint, she cannot and will not try to dispute Trump. Getting cut off to the US market's access is a very high risk, low reward that Merkel cannot afford. So in the end, in my opinion Juncker comment about the stupid with stupid thing was not the smartest thing to say because after all this is very hypocritical of him. EU just like any other exporting and manufacturing countries are as protectionist as you can get. So Merkel understands this more than the rest of them as she knows simply they cannot sustain going toe to toe against America on trade.

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Posted in: Kuroda's tough task: Navigating the long road toward stimulus exit See in context

The other significant market chart that also the BOJ is paying close attention to in order to gauge global investors psychological perpectives ie. fear is the VIX. This is where the other part of the unofficial dual mandate by the BOJ plays the part, which is global price stability.

https://framapic.org/fRyFESTS2gDY/t8b0t2TAjTfn.jpg

It's not an actual volatility, as might be calculated by the distribution of data from its mean. VIX is an implied volatility of the biggest stock market in the world, the SnP 500 index. Implied vol more than anything references the level of certainty that market makers and liquidity providers have or don't have about the future. 

A liquidity provider/market maker prices the option with some equitable inputs as money managers makes decision to call for an option hedge against probable drawback in stocks. This abstract but substantial variable is called implied volatility. When emerging of uncertainty arises, the implied volatility value includes a (periodically considerably healthy) premium over actual volatility. To put it simply, if you're a market maker/liquidity provider and you think there is significant risk emerging for a (as an example) a sharp downturn in stocks, you will nick the purchaser of that protection more, similar to what an insurance company would rate a client a bit more for the homeowner's policy in an area more likely to see earthquakes, floods, or typhoons. And they hastily will boost the insurance premium if they are uncomfortable by the risk of a violent downward action in stocks.

With that in mind, there have been some violent spikes in implied vol in the last 10 years or so. Pessimistic emotion and psychology by various market players are almost always temporarily short-term. Optimistic outward looking in the big picture is almost always as better bet overall.

In fact, VIX has been back to historic lows in volatility even with all the chaos happening throughout the world by seeing plenty of risks and crises. Big contributing part of this, is that central banks have been standing by, throughout this critical period, intervening to restore stability. But central banks help is slowly disappearing, if not probably will end fairly soon. Monetary stimulus driven economy will be handing down the economic growth baton to a fiscal stimulus and structural reform driven economy. This for sure, as a result of torch passing will create more and new higher vol environment than we've seen over the last 10 years or so in the stock markets.

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Posted in: Kuroda's tough task: Navigating the long road toward stimulus exit See in context

First up is the 10Y US bond yield...

https://framapic.org/LwkO5NuXBwGj/ZTXxC7Fdw5ZX.jpg

This is what Kuroda-san and other BOJ officials are also paying attention to in addition to their other monetary accountabilities. It fairly apparent that the 3% zone on the chart is a very significant psychological inflection point for the big boy participants at this moment in the market. For now, until US has shown some clear evidence of sizzling growth prospects as well as earnings to warrant of further hikes by the Federal Reserve, it will probably stick around this zone. BOJ is closely watching this important psychological price line to get hints on how to proceed with their challenging exit in terms of inflation related factors. If 3% threshold on rates does give way, it will not be good for global stocks in the short term (about 1 to 6 months) due to probably temporary algorithmic momentum chasing sell-off of the bond markets.

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Posted in: Kuroda's tough task: Navigating the long road toward stimulus exit See in context

Mr. Kuroda's BOJ monetary policies have been pinning rates down by manipulatively fixing their 10Y yield at or near zero. As a result, this method have been the anchor for other global interest rates. There are visible preliminary QE tapering/exit signals coming from ECB as well as some delicate clues from Japan for their quantitative, qualitative easing disposition. Yet Kuroda-san still hasn't flip the switch on the perspicacity of the policies trajectory in Japan. Have to be proactive when he does intentionally starts to end QE because the velocity of the most important bond market in the world, which is the global benchmark 10Y US treasuries, could get hot.

In addition to Kuroda-san's responsibilities at BOJ, there are a couple of interesting market charts that BOJ officials which I suspect are paying closely attention to. One is the global bond market benchmark, the 10Y USD treasury yields for inflation factors which is part of BOJ's unofficial dual mandates. Secondly is the market volatility measurement of the largest stock market in the world, the SnP 500 index. Volatility of US stock markets connects as well as correlates to certain degree of how Nikkei 225 is driven and how it also affects the Yen foreign exchange forces. This a big deal at BOJ in reference to Japan's connection of being one of the bigger trading partners to America.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

NetgrumpMar. 7 10:09 pm JST

@ UnknownPlayer

n layman's term, basically it's like an endless cycle where Americans buy cheap things from China, then China takes the dollars to buy treasury bonds in order to stockpile more credit for the Americans as well as to the rest of the world to purchase more of their low-priced products and services.

An iPhone, Samsung, Asics sneakers and many other high-end products Made in China by Taiwanese, Korean, Japanese, Chinese and Western manufacturers are definitely not cheap.

People have all kinds of different POV of what is cheap or what is expensive. Depends on individuals perceive of value, affordability, financial status, budget, etc. As a trader, I agree the high-end ones are overvalued in terms of their cost. But as a high net worth individual such as I, personally I can purchase abundance of those with no financial worries depending on distinguishing my wants and needs of course.

The labour costs are low: $ 25 for an approx. $ 800 till $ 1000 iPhone. And with total of

$ 250 for the parts and labour, where do the profits go to?

I can speculate but you tell me.

The production of 'cheap' products like the XXXL T-shirts for WalMart already moved to countries like Vietnam or Bangladesh.

Agree but Vietnam and Bangladesh barely move the needle in terms market share in global manufacturing and exports. I'm aware who are other minor players in these arenas but I rarely invest or trade in the emerging market sectors due to preferential liquidity reasons unless I see a favorable, asymmetrical risk-reward ratio trade setup that is worth investing short to medium term horizon.

The US debt to China is with $ 1.2 trillion in november 2017 just 19% of the $ 6.3 trillion of notes, treasury bills and bonds held by foreign nation. Japan holds $ 1.1 trillion btw.

The rest of the $ 20 trillion national debt is held by the American People and the US government. The Social Security Trust Fund is the mayor player.

It may be so that these $ 1.2 trillion helps China to keep the yuan relatively cheap but the debt held by China and other foreign nations keeps also the interest rate and consumer prices for Americans low. As a trader you should know that.

Thank you for sharing your valuable insight. I'm aware of this info and have similar data that I have taken into account on my investment and trade strategies. I just didn't go into nitty gritty details on the breakdown of the China situation. General overall opinionated summation of trade imbalance is what I wrote on GPlusMedia Inc website.

Interesting sources but not new to me where you got the statistics from. Are you also a trader yourself Mr/Ms/Mrs Netgrump? Are you privy to institutional info or do you get retail knowledge and data from Google algos? If you are retail trader/investor or especially if you are an institutional trader/investor, I hope for your sake, do not rely on retail platform of information distribution.

Google search algos leans a bit more to the left political spectrum enable to control, censor and spits out mostly left over, bowdlerized information for the retail herds access. Fact checking sites such as slopes.com, factcheck.org, wikipedia, etc. are comical in my view especially for the institutional traders/investors.

I take their view with a grain of salt and at best probably 50/50. Their retail sources which they give opinion to are incomplete, only a few pieces for the big picture jig saw puzzle elements and been debunked numerous times. They are late to the party and only look good on 20/20 hindsight perspective. Those type of sites as well Google search bots and other retail platform for information distribution is not an optimal choice for consistent profitable PnL.

Getting institutional information from global financial entities such as Deutsche Bank, UBS, Citi, Morgan Stanley, Bank of America, HSBC, Barclays, RBS, HSBC, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Credit Suisse, RBC, etc. Also other relevant players such world's central bank and sovereign wealth funds related reports as well as some major hedge funds valuable data are much more preferred especially if you privately trading/investing personal account in the 8-9 USD figures (or beyond) realm.

Again I appreciate your input but not sure how do I proceed with this fragmented, fractional and insufficient response in order for me to make this an overall conducive, profitable trade/investment strategy. Cheers ;-D

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

It would be interesting to see if Trump does get impeach, who will actually have any cahones to stand up against China's currency manipulation. On the Republican side, Pence nahhh too religious, Ryan no way he's bought, McConnell not a chance, Cruz? Rubio? Bush? Romney? On the Democrat side, Schumer already tried it, Polosi don't think so, Bernie? Warren? Harris? Booker? Biden? Holder? Mrs. Obama? Oprah? Doesn't seem like any of those people both sides of the political spectrum can outwit China. If previous administrations in the last 2-3 decades couldn't effectively do anything about it, I wonder who can?

Institutional mindset has to be objective and be able to navigate through the emotional, roller coaster, of unprofitable noise from the media and mostly worthless inequitable opinions from self-proclaimed, retail mentality, intellectual individuals. Global money and institutional order flows by deep pocketed big boy players will give clues and footprints in how this is going to play out in the big picture in reference to the global inter-market correlated dynamics especially in the Forex capital markets. After all, like most people say, it's all about the money.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

Not sure why most are surprised by this. EU and the UK slap tariffs on China's steel about less than a couple years ago or so to save their own butt. We've been in trade wars with China for couple decades or so. The media just didn't cover it much because it doesn't fit their narrative or agenda for better ratings. Also the three previous administrations before didn't develop effective policies regarding China's currency manipulation. They stood by and the world let it happen, while China was laughing all the way to the bank. Big part of the problem was also due to the heavy influence of the Wall Street parasites, bought and paid for Uniparty consist of both Democrats and Repubs, Chamber of Commerce and greedy business lobbyist such as Tom Donohue and Richard Trumka.

I personally do not care forTrump. I'm aware that he is not a perfect human being, let alone the POTUS. But what a deeply capitalized trader and high net worth investor like me care about is what kind of optimal solutions, not perfect but optimal, can he offer in reference to his policies. It must challenging I were in his position where you have to deal with domestic and international affairs especially with this China situation.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

Trump's tariff fulminations deceivingly only focuses on metals, but most are unaware that currency's essential role is the real game that being played here behind this curtain of complexities. Actually from a political standpoint, Mr. Trump is not the first one to engineer this strategy. In fact, Charles Schumer, a stalwart Democratic senator, back in around 2005ish wanted to push a Congress bill to impose tariffs on China of somewhere around 35% or so. Somehow China allowed their currency to insignificantly weaken somewhat around that time with this reconciliation. So for those who are uneasy about reprisals which historically is a response to protectionism, well I must say this is clearly some kind of retribution for couple decades of luxury transposition.

This also connects with NAFTA renegotiation. China as well as other exporting countries uses Canada and Mexico as a broker for parts shipments and manufacturing the products. China and others uses this loophole in the fatally flawed agreement as a backdoor to export their finished goods to US consumers via under the NAFTA rules. This exploitative backdoor approach is one of the major leading causes of the global trade imbalances especially with US manufacturers moving their operations to Mexico. With Canada and Mexico as the brokers, TPP nations as well as some EU companies to some extent can now also have the option to exploit this backdoor loophole by assembling their products in Canada and Mexico and export their finished products to the biggest consumer market in the world, the US.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

The current administration's team of economic, commerce and trade advisors understands that in order to forfend global trade imbalances and financial bubbles from developing, the logical equilibrium mechanism are currencies. One of China's economic models, the government has to babysit and manipulate to make their currency as cheap as possible.

On the other hand, if the Chinese yuan in an open economy is traded through the free floating system, the market demand for China currency would be much higher. The value of their currency would skyrocket in terms of supply and demand economics due to the reflection of China's exponentially, domineering growth.

This would be a huge problem for China because of the restricted economic infrastructure. China economic model is only deep in the manufacturing and export sector but every else is shallow. If their currency is too strong, it would make their exports less attractive which will significantly affect their headlong growth and accumulation of wealth as well as their facilitation of global credit.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

As a result, presently China is now on pace to overtake the gold medal for economic growth, though it still has just about 1/8 of the per capita GDP as America. The big picture here is not about China's ascension the economic power, that's US least worry. At the moment, the bigger threat is manipulation of currency which also worried the G-20 as their top of the long list of concerns.

Basically Chinese Yuan or Renminbi manipulation is the heart of the present world trade imbalances which is a contributor to the underlying cause of the world financial crisis. This is a type of prescription or ingredient for more economic cycles of booms and busts but this time with even more larger recurrence. Restoration of imbalances by disproportional economies that are too reliant on either imports/exports will never exist until the Chinese currency is fairly valued.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

So further on China has become the seller to everybody or the globe's Wal-Mart per se. This allowed them to further more acquire abundance of foreign currency and as result they are able to undercut prices around the world.

Being the holder of about 3 trillion USD worth of currency reserves give them multiple, flexible options. One their tactics is buying massive amounts of US Treasury bonds to manipulatively anchor rates on the low end so the American and world consumers can borrow cheap and then purchase more of their low-cost products. This is a strategic move to add more stockpile to their currency reserves via withdrawing US wealth and depositing back to stockpile their own luxury. An then the cycles goes on...

Somehow America got a slap in the face and woke up around 2005ish. China was threatened with tariffs unless they discontinue with its damaging currency policies. China kind of relinquished and agreed to repudiate the fix to the dollar in order to start raising the value of its currency. This is where the BS manage float system was established by Chinese officials.

China can still directly or indirectly interfere and manipulate with this system. They allow it to gradually step up less the 5% or so during 2005ish - 2013ish. Logically this might sound alright but compared to the double digit pacing of Chinese growth throughout most of that interval, this was just a drop in the bucket.

America passively cries about along the way but somehow never did enough and allowed it to continue.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

When the orange dotard says that China is robbing the US, he is insinuating about the Chinese economy bursting exponentially when they fixed their currency through 2005 after their decade of imposing depreciation of the Yuan around 80s-90s. As a result, China's able to extract from other developing countries foreign currency and jobs as well as cornering the global export market.

With the monumental devaluing of their currency, China in 2005ish became the 3rd biggest in economy rankings by raking in 350 billion USD to 3.5 trillion USD. See chart below from Word Bank...

https://framapic.org/9qCSaMOfkFIn/Qw19WDzVOGQr.png

Compare to America GDP about same interval during China's enormous Yuan manipulation, it pretty darn eye opening to see the inconceivable ground attained by China against the US.

https://framapic.org/uNJlKnP3Dbzy/6wLjYhyBkF5V.png

Can't think of any other countries in the last 2-3 decades with this kind of aggressive, wanton economic growth. Exponential growth such as this can only be achieved through currency manipulation or in the legal term that Chinese officials calls it ''managed float'' which is total BS.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

Most people know that China is dominantly the globe's manufacturer and tons of factory related jobs had been lost. Logic thinking might say that Chinese labor is so damn cheap but most are unaware how China really did it in the process of economic ascension. There is more to it than just cheap labor... way more.

You see, China's go to economic weapon of choice, and pretty damn potent, has always been its currency because of the way they structure their economic model of deep levels of manufacturing while other sectors are shallow. Pegging their currency at overly, marked down levels and at the same time weightily devaluing it was the main reason for their ascension to 2nd biggest economy as evidenced on the chart below.

https://framapic.org/AlDTxH8zJl22/lkxqU803XPiB.png

Forex chart represents a strong dollar and weak Yuan and shows how China ravaged its currency. More than 80%+ or so histrionic decline against US dollar from early 80's to around mid 90's. Guess what, this was a huge deal because it gave them the upper hand in reference to their augmented growth. It was such under the radar to the rest of the world while at same time, stealth-fully effective.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

China became the 2nd largest economy behind America as the aftermath of their cheap currency policies. As byproduct, their foreign currency accumulation became the biggest reserve war chest in the world today. With these amassment of foreign currency reserves, China then uses it to furrow into the global credit markets especially with US treasury bonds. This incitement of low-cost credit is one of the main reasons that fundamentally drive the global credit bubble and bust in regards to the global financial crisis.

In layman's term, basically it's like an endless cycle where Americans buy cheap things from China, then China takes the dollars to buy treasury bonds in order to stockpile more credit for the Americans as well as to the rest of the world to purchase more of their low-priced products and services.

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Posted in: Do you think U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to slap taxes on steel and aluminum imports will result in a global trade war, with other countries imposing tariffs on U.S. imports? See in context

Interesting comments from retail mindset perspectives here. For most individuals, which I like to call the retail space perspective, such as employees who depend getting paid from their bosses, others who are self-employed that own their position, as well as small cap business operators/owners might view this as a global trade war.

But as a full time personal, private institutional macro fundamental investor and technical intrinsic value-based trader like me who trades and invest 7-8 figure voluminous transactions through forex futures & spot, options, bonds, stock indexes, ETFs, commodities, precious metals, cryptocurrencies and real estate, IMO there is more to this than just steel tariffs from an institutional mentality point of view.

MSM which I call the propaganda centers, briskly swoops in to discredit the announcement, blaming the stock markets bearish moves and rages on with trade war synopsis. Media is showing their true colors of how intellectually deceptive, oblivious or unsophisticated they really are in assessing the tariff matters as if there is no historical framework behind this strategic arrangement.

Big part of the distortion of info, besides the darling know-it-all media, is Google's controlled, censored search algos that spits out left over scrap of expurgated information that's accessed by the retail masses. Institutional avenue of information distribution is much more prominent for better understanding of the long term, big picture of how this relates to global inter-market correlation of forces and dynamics connectivity.

The question that needs to be answer for the media pundits as well as so called experts is, where the heck have they been in the last 20+ years or so? The trade imbalance issues don't have much to do with protectionism elements. This is all about the Chinese Yuan or Renminbi, nothing more nothing less. Period. You see, in the last 25 years or so, China cut-rate currency policy has been used to manipulate the global markets by pegging down their currency enabling them to corner the global export market.

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Posted in: BOJ's Kataoka warns against premature exit from easy policy See in context

This is good news for institutional traders and investors such as myself in terms of providing extra security layer of liquidity to stabilize the interbank market even more. Kuroda-san and the BOJ crew will mostly like keep the monetary policies' status quo for his reappointment.

For most individuals, which I like to call the retail space perspective, such as employees who rely on paycheck from their boss, or self-employed people who own their position, as well as small cap business owner operators might view BOJ's monetary policies to end deflation with QQE (quantitative qualitative easing) which has not really shown the optimal results as evidenced by the current inflation statistics.

I agree that Kuroda's policies has been overall ineffective in creating meaningful real wage growth among the masses but instead trickling it down to the institutional space such as blue chip big cap corporations, banks, etc. who then takes advantage of the near zero interests to borrow money enable to do buybacks and mergers & acquisitions.

But majority of them never really share their record profit cash flows back to their important worker bees who does most of the heavy lifting. That is unfair to most of the public as they are financially in a pinch these days. Needless to say, Bank of Japan has not been very effective in creating inflationary policies to significantly improve the socioeconomic side of the spectrum.

In my view, BOJ seems to have an unofficial dual mandates. One is to create policies in connection with inflation matters. The other, that most retail mentality individuals are not aware of is the mandate of price stability. You see, from as institutional mindset point of view, price stability is also very important in regards to the inter-connectivity of market forces and price dynamics.

This is where Kuroda's methods been tolerably yielding. You see, Bank of Japan plays a significant role in the price stability arena by globally coordinating indirectly with other major central banks such the Federal Reserve in the US, Bank of England, and the European Central Bank.

Just as when the FED, ECB, BOE, BOJ and other developing countries central banks where coordinating their QE programs to preserve and synthesize some type of rescue plan, they also warrant disposition of QE tapering which eventually lead to exit their ballooning balance sheet.

FED is slowly leaning towards normalizing rates because of the changing shift of market theme dynamics regarding the expectancy of the current US administration's fiscal stimulus to kick start the global recovery. While the ECB, BOE and BOJ have still work do to before following the US lead in raising rates, this should keep the lid on the bond markets liquidity crunch.

So the role BOJ (as well as ECB) plays in the US interest rate market, and global interest in general in the last few months is Kuroda-san's QE program. This policy entails pegging the interest rate on their 10-year government bond at or near zero. It has been the anchor on global interest rates since they adopted the plan in September 2016. And as there has been growing momentum in the global economy, there has been speculation that the BOJ may signal an end to that policy.

That now looks less likely to be anytime soon. With Mr. Kuroda's reappointment as the BOJ governor as well as new deputy known as an advocate for bolder QE, the zero rate 10-year yield policy in Japan should continue to keep a lid on the global benchmark 10-year US treasury bonds.

This is important for a full time personal, private institutional macro fundamental investor and technical intrinsic value-based trader like me who trades and invest through forex futures & spot, options, bonds, stock indexes, ETFs, commodities, precious metals and real estate. The deeper the liquidity, the better since 7-8 figure voluminous transactions are not as easy to enter and exit out of trading positions. Of course you can still trade through thin liquidity but its challenging putting on big sizes as I do.

As for the global markets turmoil in general, whenever you hear the MSM or as I call them propaganda centers because they always have an agenda to promote or market and almost no longer report impartial facts. Gone are the days of unbiased reporting of journalist like Seymour Herch. There is probably only one I can think of these days who is actually a real reporter, someone like Sharyl Attkisson.

Anyways as I mentioned before about mainstream talking heads like a famous economist on TV or a CEO or an official or someone famous who comments about markets in general especially when it's negative, I would recommend to take anything they say with a grain of salt. They are smart in their own field but only get paid to talk and usually nonsense and very bias. There are so many intelligent geniuses that can talk so intellectually on this planet but almost none of them are consistently, profitable traders.

So many people can talk eloquently with pretty sounding words but when you tell these people to actually personally trade their own money with the markets, almost all likely will fail to be consistently profitable day in day out, weekly, monthly, quarterly or annually depending on time-frame and investment horizon.

You can listen but do not take their comments that serious regardless of their status because trading the markets is designed statistically for only less than 1% who are winners and the rest are... you know the answer to that. Another reason is that arguably it's probably the highest paid career and the most independent, self-reliant way to earn income by competing with smartest, brightest people and most sophisticated robotic algorithms in the world in a zero-sum environment. Survival of the fittest at its finest.

99% of people do not know beyond the actual deep, inner workings of market mechanics and the its global connectivity dynamics. 99% only sees it as a chaotic up and down crap that do not make sense. Same goes to fact checking website about markets, they so basic that most of the stuff the so called market experts write about; only, maybe a percent of the realities of the market dynamics are covered.

Its impossible to quantify and qualify the psychology of the collective market participants, big boy players like central banks, sovereign wealth funds, hedge funds, insurance companies, pension funds and other commercial institutional players. Even behavioral, psychological or neurological studies have proven to be ineffective to explain the phenomenon of market dynamics.

Because logic in markets rarely applies as someone in the name of John Maynard Keynes famous quote said once, “The market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent. The smartest people who excel in academics and as well as PHDs are almost always the crappiest traders. Lots of reasons such ego, too smart for their own good, pride, not humble enough, undisciplined, laziness, and many other psychological, emotional destructive habits and behaviors that are some of the barriers of successful trading and investing.

The last mini crash in the Dow and S&P, as well as the Nikkei and other global stock indices was an algo driven inefficient, impulse move. There was heavy volume but almost have very light negative delta which means a very big, big, big player or several big boy smart money participants wanted to buy more but at the time could not find any liquidity on the other side to match his/her/their sizing. Market makers, counter-party dealers, and liquidity providers didn't have enough capital size to match the market order from a particular player or some players.

So market makers and counter-party dealers have to withdraw their insufficient liquidity and then algos follow through to drive down the next order flow of liquidity block that could sufficiently equalize the big players orders. He/she/they then could accumulate more bids in order to buy more at better wholesale market rice. Probable reason to put in the big size was the expectation of the current US administration fiscal stimulus fundamentals for the economy to kick start. It did not look like a fear trade psychology traded by multiple big player entities because of the nature of the move in terms of delta.

It was a liquidity issue more than anything else mixed with technical correction aka profit taking as well as square positioning for smaller speculators and flushing out weak handed participants who chase retail pricing aka retail traders which fuel the high velocity of the inefficient downward impulse.

The big boys know better than to just crash the market on purpose with no macro fundamental reasons behind it. There is presently no credible evidence that current macro economic fundamentals points to recession. In fact, it's the opposite. The global recovery is in the very early stages of economic boom. Intermarket correlations on various global market charts tells it all especially in the energy and commodities sector.

So whenever there is a market crash with a 10-20 percent correctional dip attached to it, very explosive with fear mongering and doomsday flavor to it, and all the media saying it's the end, then it means it is time to reload and a gift to buy at discounted price. Totally still in the bull uptrend.

In other words, for most institutionally minded players, this a green light signal to move money out of bonds and into higher yielding or dividend paying instruments such as stocks. The flattening yield curve control that Kuroda-san is babysitting is another way of doing unlimited QE by buying theoretically infinite amount of JGBs to push yields back down to near or at zero. As a byproduct, it acts an anchor to other global market interest rates.

This is inflationary in a sense as it creates the illusion of wealth effect which is part of central banks intended purposes. This is fine and dandy, but the real big issue of this is a lot of companies both institutional and retail are borrowing money at really super cheap rates to buyback their stocks and do M&As instead of investing back their profits to productivity and wage benefits.

Only real growth can be achieved through reinvesting in improving productivity and necessary workers benefits. This will create real inflation in Japan. This is the real issue that Kuroda-san must really face and coordinate with Abe-san with his infamous Abenomics arrows.

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Posted in: Students plan protests, Washington march to demand gun control after school shooting See in context

Today 12:50 pm JST Posted in: Students plan protests, Washington march to demand gun control after school shooting See in context

zichiFeb. 22 04:58 pm JST

UknownPlayer

As someone who is dual citizen American Canadian residing between Canada, Switzerland, and Japan who used to serve in the US Marine Corp Special Forces, I personally own couple of guns for protection. I own a shotgun in Canada and a handgun in Switzerland.

You served with an elite anti-terrorist unit? Quiet a leap from there and into big international finance.

Should all assault type weapons be banned? What gun controls would reduce/end these so many tragic mass shootings.

You have no guns while in Japan though.

This is a continuation from the previous post:

https://japantoday.com/category/world/update-1-u.s.-students-plan-protests-washington-march-to-demand-gun-control-after-mass-shooting#comment-1617069

As for you question regarding banning all assault weapons, yea I can fully support that. I agree its going to make a difference but I am not so sure about in the long run. Crazies will find a way to get it somewhere, somehow. That is just human nature.

Anyways, now onto how we may able to preemptively prevent and/or reduce (sorry but it will never end) these tragic mass shootings. My opinion will have some economic market elements in this. Last week’s shooting at a high school in Florida was a grim and jarring reminder of deep cultural problems lurking just beneath the veneer of our materially comfortable society. Those problems are beyond the scope of libertarianism per se, but again we see that greater liberty will require a renaissance in civil society: nihilism and hopelessness among any segment of the population is far more dangerous than “assault rifles.” The less we are governed internally, the more we invite external governance from the state.

Millions of guns already exist everywhere in American households, so enacting laws “like Europe” won’t work. Voluntary turnovers of guns to police won’t even scratch the surface, much less entice criminals. Involuntary confiscation is both a political and practical nonstarter. There are no top-down political solutions available from Washington. Gun control doesn't actually prevent crime, but it does provide the political class and media with another diversionary bitter cultural debate. Americans are deeply divided on guns, just as they are deeply divided on abortion and climate change and scores of other issues. And why should we expect otherwise, in a far-flung country of 320 million people with wildly diverse geographies, economies, and cultures?

Real federalism, long abandoned by progressives and conservatives alike, is one approach with the potential to reduce political conflicts over guns. Manhattan and Montana might have different perspectives here, and both can manage things without Congress. Contrary to popular belief, the Second Amendment neither “federalized” gun laws nor created a right to private ownership of firearms. It simply enshrined the notion that “the people” need to be armed to defend themselves potentially against the state itself. We don’t need a constitution to recognize all humans have an innate and pre-existing right to self-defense. To make that right effective (especially for weaker members of society) tools must be employed. Guns are simply those tools, inanimate objects that cannot be imbued with innate qualities of good or evil. The right to own guns flows naturally from self-ownership of our bodies.

The libertarian response to mass shootings, in particular school shootings, is to allow teachers and other personnel to carry weapons on campus. In fact, the broader libertarian program is to have most people armed, or at least potentially armed, to create a safer (not to mention more polite) society. If we cannot snap our fingers and produce crime-free cities and neighborhoods where nobody needs to carry a gun, then at least we allow everyone the ability to dissuade or defend against criminal shooters. This is all well and good, but ignores the market impulse to outsource services to specialists. This is why neighborhoods hire private security patrols, and why celebrities hire professional bodyguards. Not everyone wants to carry a gun or train themselves in gun proficiency. And there is the issue of scale, where individuals might find themselves arrayed against organized criminal gangs.    

Rather than endlessly debate the fraught political process of crafting illiberal gun control laws, we ought to think about private-market solutions that focus on controlling crime. We should think in terms of market economics, where private property and correct incentives give us what government and laws cannot: a mechanism to determine possible harms and the cost of protecting against or preventing those harms. People want safe neighborhoods and schools, which is just another way to say there is a market for them. Generally speaking, the US legal system imposes premises liability on property owners whose negligence (or willful conduct) results in someone getting injured on that property. This arose conceptually through common law courts and juries applying general negligence concepts,

We accord different degrees of legal responsibility (“duty”) to landowners based on the identity of the injured party: a trespasser, for example, has less recourse to sue for injury than a business invitee (i.e., a customer). The law considers whether the injured party had a legitimate purpose being there, and in some cases whether they contributed to their injury through their own negligence. The duty to make one’s property safe from a particular harm relates to, and in a sense hinges on, the foreseeability of that harm. Leaving spilled milk in a grocery aisle too long could well subject the owner to paying damages for a shopper who suffers a fall — a fall that was quite predictable and clearly caused by the wet floor. But intentional criminal acts by a third party, much like acts of God, generally absolve the property owner of liability. After all, no shooter ever entered the grocery before, so why must the owner guard against this most unlikely event?

But should a public school district have a higher duty to keep students safe than the grocer has for shoppers? Arguably yes, in that society values children’s lives, well-being, and innocence perhaps more than adults. And we force children into school attendance via truancy laws and meddling protective services agencies. Furthermore, are school shootings now foreseeable even though they remain exceedingly rare? Does the media attention and notoriety given to such shootings change the calculus? At some point, perhaps today, school shootings could become foreseeable in the eyes of a jury. We can’t necessarily draw conclusions here, but the question is whether the owners of public schools — generally municipal or county school districts — should be immune from lawsuits for school shootings simply because they are political subdivisions of states? Should sovereign immunity apply to them, or should they be forced to consider security measures just as private owners must? After all, it seems clear that a mass shooting at a prestigious private school would result in litigation.

It seems clear that imposing tort liability on school owners and operators, even government owners, would both improve security and provide a ready source of compensation for the families of victims. Private security agencies, which have a market reputation to develop or protect, almost certainly would provide more efficient service than government police — for the simple reason that more crime punishes their bottom line, while it often creates calls for increased police budgets. And private security models like Disneyland benefit from wanting to create a peaceful and happy environment, where security forces have every incentive not to escalate situations or incur liability. Furthermore, private insurance models could help schools rationally allocate funds relative to the risks involved. Since school shootings are rare, premiums to cover such an event should be constrained. But other lesser types of crime in schools could be insured against as well, helping administrators better understand what they’re up against. And insurance companies would bend over backward to offer advice on avoiding shootings, since they would bear the cost of liability payments.

Admittedly, public schools using taxpayer funds to hire private security and pay insurance premiums muddies the waters. But at least it moves all of the parties involved — school districts, administrators, teachers, security providers, and parents — toward a market-based approach to safer schools. Tort liability, however imperfectly administered by government courts, offers one way to align the interests of parents and school owners in preventing further horrific events. A rational system of private security and criminal control would focus on market solutions that actually reduce crime generally and provide meaningful compensation to victims. In other words, it would focus on prevention and restitution. The marketplace can provide both far better than the state, with its amorphous and broken system of criminal justice and mass incarceration — paid for by the taxpayers it claims to represent as “the people” in criminal cases.

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Posted in: Students plan protests, Washington march to demand gun control after school shooting See in context

zichiFeb. 22 04:58 pm JST

UknownPlayer

As someone who is dual citizen American Canadian residing between Canada, Switzerland, and Japan who used to serve in the US Marine Corp Special Forces, I personally own couple of guns for protection. I own a shotgun in Canada and a handgun in Switzerland.

You served with an elite anti-terrorist unit? Quiet a leap from there and into big international finance.

Should all assault type weapons be banned? What gun controls would reduce/end these so many tragic mass shootings.

You have no guns while in Japan though.

Apologize for not responding as I extremely managing some trading positions. Of course I don't have any guns while in Japan. That's madness!! As for weapons banned and mass shootings subject matter, I will give you my take on those issues by connecting it to constitution 2nd amendment, market, psychiatric drugs and FPV video games.

I'm aware you were also a soldier in UK? Anyways as for me I am, Samoan/Polynesian ethnicity born out of Hilo, Hawaii, 43 years young, serve in US Marine Corps Special Forces specifically in 2nd Marine Division of 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion Unit in Iraq war 2003-2008. My homecamp was at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and got deployed to Al Anbar Province, Iraq. Our division was responsible for operations in Al Anbar Province in western Iraq from the 1st Marine Division in March 2005. The province is part of the "Sunni Triangle," where the Iraqi insurgency was very active, and includes the cities of Falluja and Ramadi at that time.

I became soldier right out of after high school in 1993 so thats about 15 yrs of service. I think the war supposedly ended around 2011ish but only able to serve until 2008 due getting shot on the shoulder and also ended tearing my ACL and MCL at the same during a critical standoff. Return home due to injury and ended rehabing for a year or so.

While contemplating about the future during the painful rehab, I decided to take the IDE (International and Development Economics) at Yale University since my mobility was not great. When I was a kid living in a very poor orphanage, I always had the knack for anything related to global outreach regarding money and getting rich. Year after graduate, I work for Goldman Sachs Group Inc., Research Division specifically in Foreign Exchange area back in 2012-2015. Now after three years. I personally trade my own funds as an Institutional trader and investor full time basis.

Anyway back to topic... I am not a conservative nor a liberal/progressive although my postings might lean slightly to centrist conservativeish, I am a proud PATRIOT and Constitutionist: US Constitution and all the states constitutions. As and ex-soldier its my honor and duty to try my best to preserve and protect the constitution. Since I am not lawyer or judge, I will still try to do my best to NOT “interpret” the US Constitution but to take its words as the meaning of them are easily found (language does change over time). I also read news events and discussions of the time to gain a better understanding of their (framers) meaning when they say or write something. The way it was taken to mean by the people of the nation.

So following the murder of 17 students at a Florida high school, Trump has announced his commitment to enacting further unconstitutional federal gun control legislation. It’s a textbook example of why we shouldn’t trust politicians to protect our rights, and why I recommend anti-commandeering strategy at the state and local level is so vital. It goes without saying that the Second Amendment leaves no room for the feds to handle this issue; it is clearly left to the states, per the 10 Amendment. But because the Second Amendment is not in force effectively today, gun grabbers are eager to use any and every opportunity to push forward with their agenda.

If every state had a law on the books simply refusing to enforce any and all future federal gun laws, then this discussion occurring in D.C. would be dead on arrival. But because states have not taken that critical step, we are forced once again to hope and pray that sufficient pressure is levied on Congress to stop any gun control bill brought forward. This is also a lesson for those who think that lawmakers with the right letter next to their name can be trusted to defend the Second Amendment. The Congress is controlled by Republicans, as is the executive branch. How many more Republican legislators are needed before this issue becomes moot?

It doesn’t matter whether Trump or any other politician is under heavy political pressure. What matters is that the entire problem could be preemptively eliminated by passing a some type of modified version 2nd Amendment that provides enhancement at the state, county, and even city level. If Americans want to protect their gun rights, the answer isn’t in hiring the right lobbyists, or donating to the right political campaign, or joining the NRA. It’s taking action where you live and putting as many obstacles to unconstitutional laws in place as you can – right now, and before any new ones arise.

The threat of new and more intrusive violations of our right to keep and bear arms never goes away, regardless of election outcomes. Suffice to say, federal courts can’t be trusted to strike down these illegal measures, either. I advocate that refusal to cooperate with officers of the union would be an effective means of preventing the feds from stepping outside their constitutional bounds. The federal government relies heavily on state cooperation to implement and enforce almost all of its laws, regulations and acts – including gun control. By simply withdrawing this necessary cooperation, states can nullify in effect many federal actions. As noted by the National Governor’s Association during the partial government shutdown of 2013, “states are partners with the federal government on most federal programs.”

Senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano agreed. In a televised discussion on the issue, he noted that a single state taking this step would make federal gun laws “nearly impossible” to enforce. Unlike other methods of resisting federal tyranny, this approach has 170 years of legal jurisprudence behind it. The U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly held that states cannot be required to enforce federal laws. So I would recommend by contacting local legislator and telling them to introduce their own version of the 2nd Amendment. I will leave it this regarding the 2nd amendment and will provide my opinion in regards to the other 2 connections for another couple more postings when I have some time. Apologize for the long post. Please understand I come from military background as we need to be thorough with our thoughts to try and best cover almost every angle as well as in addition to my economical global perspective from writing tons and tons of thesis during my uni days at Yale.

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Posted in: Students plan protests, Washington march to demand gun control after school shooting See in context

The Dick Act of 1902 also known as the Efficiency of Militia Bill H.R. 11654, of June 28, 1902 cannot be repealed and invalidates all gun-control laws.

Besides the culture, this is why guns In America will never be taken away. Period.

As someone who is dual citizen American Canadian residing between Canada, Switzerland, and Japan who used to serve in the US Marine Corp Special Forces, I personally own couple of guns for protection.

I own a shotgun in Canada and a handgun in Switzerland. As far as bump stocks go, if they really do get banned, I see it as no big deal whatsoever for several reasons:

One you can't shoot straight with one.

Two, you should not waste that much ammo when you are not going to be re-supplied.

Three, I don't know of anyone as far as I know and talk to among avid gun owners, who totally support fully automatic weapons in public hands.

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Posted in: Trump says arming teachers could prevent school massacres See in context

A simple timeline: 

In 2011/2012 Broward County School administration made a policy decision to block the arrests of students in order to improve their education statistics. 

In 2013 that same school board was warned what was happening as a result of that policy. 

- In 2015 the School doubled-down on the diversionary policies and allowed students to break the law, including physical violence, without legal consequence. 

http://wlrn.org/post/south-florida-schools-join-white-house-school-discipline-summit

In January 2017 Nikolas Cruz criminally assaulted someone; again, law enforcement engagement was blocked by policy. 

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/article201216104.html

A year later in February 2018 Cruz killed seventeen students.

What happens when you stop arresting students for clear criminal conduct and then lessen the school punishment therein?…. You get this.

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Posted in: Ivanka Trump to attend Winter Olympics finale in S Korea See in context

Explained yesterday related to the following JT article post...

https://japantoday.com/category/business/update-1-south-korea-launches-wto-trade-challenge-against-u.s.-duties#comment-1615780

Trump uses specific emissaries, only the most trustworthy, for critical geopolitical messaging in advance of big action.

White House Delegation Announcement here...

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/president-trump-announces-presidential-delegation-republic-korea-attend-closing-ceremony-xxiii-olympic-winter-games/

Ivanka carries the diplomatic message (some excerpts from yesterdays post) of WTO Trade challenge by SK.

[…] Justin from Canada recently signed up to the Trans-Pacific Partnership. With that decision the fatal flaw -from a U.S. perspective- just became the final straw to end the U.S. participation in NAFTA.

The U.S. cannot make any bilateral trade deals with TPP nations while those same TPP nations have an alternative access route to the U.S. market through Canada via NAFTA.

Therefore the only way for President Trump to finish a trade agreement with South Korea (current tense negotiations – see Samsung etc.) is to first remove their NAFTA alternative. Anticipating this reality S-Korea also filed a WTO trade challenge earlier today.

Understandably, South Korea is currently hosting the U.S. Olympics and it would have been extremely poor form, very impolite, and economically very destabilizing for Moon Jae-in if POTUS Trump had made the NAFTA announcement in the months/weeks leading up to their international spotlight event.

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Posted in: Trump says arming teachers could prevent school massacres See in context

This is a very similar case that leads 2012 Trayvon Martin trail into the rabbit hole of manipulated diversionary school discipline to avoid criminal arrests. Just so the school system could improve their statistics.

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Posted in: Trump says arming teachers could prevent school massacres See in context

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/article201216104.html

As expected – buried deep inside a Miami Herald article about the Parkland school shooter, Nikolas Cruz, and a school board questioning their progressive policies, found the following:

[…] Absent Cruz’s school records, it is hard to say precisely when Cruz’s behavior became an acute problem for teachers and administrators. Disciplinary reports obtained by the Herald show that at Westglades Middle School, which he attended in 2013, he’d been cited numerous times for disrupting class, unruly behavior, insulting or profane language, profanity toward staff, disobedience and other rules violations.

Records show the behaviors continued at Marjory Stoneman Douglas [High School], which he attended in 2016 and 2017 before being transferred, with discipline being dispensed for fighting, profanity, and an “assault.” It appears the Jan. 19, 2017 assault resulted in a referral for a “threat assessment.” A few months later, Cruz landed at an Off Campus Learning Center, where he remained for only about five months.

Broward County School Board are beginning to admit their mistakes? A bit late but there it is as I outline here on this related JT article post https://japantoday.com/category/world/update-3-trump-fbi-missed-signs-on-florida-shooting-due-to-russia-probe#comment-1614635

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